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Source: International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP)
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Jang, Bohyun
Snyder, Anastasia R.
A Cohort Comparison of Relationship between Mobility and Union Formation among Young Adults in the US
Presented: Busan, Republic of Korea, IUSSP International Population Conference, August 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP)
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Geocoded Data; Life Course; Marriage; Migration; Mobility, Residential; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Migration and residential mobility hold significance among young adults in the transition to adulthood, representing a life course event such as a transition to independence from parents and family, a turning point which diverts previous experiences, and an investment behavior for maximizing life chances. Despite several studies on the relationship between mobility and family formation, little is known about the role of mobility in union formation (i.e., marriage and cohabitation) and how that relationship has changed over time. By using two comparable datasets of different birth cohorts from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and 1997 (NLSY79 and NLSY97), this study examines how moving events are related to union formation and how the relationship has changed across decades in the United States. As the NLSY studies have collected panel data from nationally representative samples of two birth cohorts, that is, those born in 1957-1964 for the NLSY79 and born in 1980-1984 for the NLSY97, the current study will contribute greatly to understanding the changing role of migration and residential mobility as a life course event in the United States
Bibliography Citation
Jang, Bohyun and Anastasia R. Snyder. "A Cohort Comparison of Relationship between Mobility and Union Formation among Young Adults in the US." Presented: Busan, Republic of Korea, IUSSP International Population Conference, August 2013.
2. Joshi, Heather
Cooksey, Elizabeth C.
Verropoulou, Georgia
Menaghan, Elizabeth G.
Tzavidis, Nikos
Combining Childrearing with Work: Do Maternal Employment Experiences Compromise Child Development
Presented: Marrakech, Morocco, XXVI International Population Conference of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP), Sep 27-Oct 2, 2009
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); British Cohort Study (BCS); Child Care; Child Health; Family Structure; Job Characteristics; Maternal Employment; NCDS - National Child Development Study (British); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using longitudinal panel study data from both Great Britain (BCS70) and the United States (NLSY79) we explore how various aspects of maternal employment during the first few years of a child's life might impact the cognitive and behavioral development of children as they move through early and middle childhood, and into early adolescence. Both the UK and the US have seen a substantial increase in the employment of mothers with young children in recent years although due to different maternity leave policies in the two countries, American mothers tend to return to employment after a shorter period than British mothers. We investigate both patterns of maternal employment and the nature of that employment, and utilize multi-level, multivariate modeling to examine how mother's labour force involvement during early childhood might be associated with various child outcomes that are complementary across the two countries.
Bibliography Citation
Joshi, Heather, Elizabeth C. Cooksey, Georgia Verropoulou, Elizabeth G. Menaghan and Nikos Tzavidis. "Combining Childrearing with Work: Do Maternal Employment Experiences Compromise Child Development." Presented: Marrakech, Morocco, XXVI International Population Conference of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP), Sep 27-Oct 2, 2009.
3. Lee, Dohoon
England, Paula A.
Family Background, Childhood Disadvantage, and Unintended Fertility
Presented: Busan, Republic of Korea, IUSSP International Population Conference, August 2013
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP)
Keyword(s): Age at Birth; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Family Background; Fertility; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Wantedness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the U.S., most research on unintended fertility tends to address differences by family background and the sociodemographic contexts in which unintended births occur. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which family background is associated with unintended childbearing. In this study, we propose childhood disadvantage as a key mediating factor that explains the family background gradient on unintended fertility. Drawing upon the life course and human capital formation literature, we identify four dimensions of childhood disadvantage: economic resources, family structure, parenting quality, and self-regulation. Using data from the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and event history models, this study examines the relative role that each dimension of childhood disadvantage plays in linking family background to unintended fertility.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Dohoon and Paula A. England. "Family Background, Childhood Disadvantage, and Unintended Fertility." Presented: Busan, Republic of Korea, IUSSP International Population Conference, August 2013.
4. Sironi, Maria
Barban, Nicola
Impicciatore, Roberto
The Role of Parental Social Class in the Transition to Adulthood: a Sequence Analysis Approach in Italy and the United States
Presented: Busan, Republic of Korea, IUSSP International Population Conference, August 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP)
Keyword(s): Cross-national Analysis; Economic Independence; Family Background; Italy/Italian Social Surveys; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In comparison to older cohorts, younger men and women in the developed societies delay their transition to adulthood and follow more complex trajectories. However, within cohorts there remain variations in timing and sequencing of events. Two of the major determinants of life course events related to transition to adulthood, and in particular family formation, are gender and social class. These two characteristics can influence the sequence of events characterizing the transition to adulthood in terms of socioeconomic inequalities through a different availability of opportunities for social mobility. Several studies show that in North America, a higher familiar status tends to decrease the complexity of trajectories or, in other words, to push towards a more "traditional" pattern, i.e. a trajectory in which the end of education and the first job precedes union formation, which in turn precedes parenthood. On the other hand, it has been highlighted that in Europe the familiar status has a different effect with an increasing complexity among higher status. The aim of the research is to examine in details the sequences of transitions highlighting, in a comparative perspective, how the life trajectories are influenced by parental social class and gender in the US and Italy.
Bibliography Citation
Sironi, Maria, Nicola Barban and Roberto Impicciatore. "The Role of Parental Social Class in the Transition to Adulthood: a Sequence Analysis Approach in Italy and the United States." Presented: Busan, Republic of Korea, IUSSP International Population Conference, August 2013.