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Source: International Review of Applied Economics
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Gius, Mark Paul
The Impact of Job Mobility on Earnings: Using Occupational and Industrial Classifications to Identify Job Changes
International Review of Applied Economics 28,2 (March 2014): 181-190.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02692171.2013.838545#.UvveIxDvDpV
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Earnings; Industrial Classification; Mobility, Job; Occupational Status; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median number of years that a US worker has been with their current employer is 4.4 years. Although many job changes may not be classified as ‘career changes,’ any type of job change may have an impact on a person’s future earnings. In the present study, the following three types of job changes are examined in order to determine which ones result in higher incomes: a change in occupational status; a change in industry; or a change in both. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), a log-linear wage regression with a correction for self-selection is estimated. Results suggest that changing jobs within the same industry or within the same occupation both increase a person’s income. However, a job change that is characterized by both a change in industry and occupation reduces a person’s income. The present study is one of the few studies to examine the effects of job mobility on earnings when mobility is defined in the context of changes in occupational and/or industrial classification.
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "The Impact of Job Mobility on Earnings: Using Occupational and Industrial Classifications to Identify Job Changes." International Review of Applied Economics 28,2 (March 2014): 181-190.
2. McCrate, Elaine
Expectations of Adult Wages and Teenage Childbearing
International Review of Applied Economics 6,3 (1992): 309-328.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/758534264
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; Family Background; Mothers; Regions; Religion; Sex Education; Sex Roles; Teenagers; Wages, Adult; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The adult earnings of women and the age at which they initiated childbearing are well known to be positively correlated. Most previous research on teenage mothers has emphasized that early births reduce later earnings. This article explores whether the causality might run in the opposite direction: whether the expectation of low adult wages might increase the probability of teenage childbearing. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, and treating teenage motherhood, wages and education as jointly determined, this investigation gives strong support to the idea that low wages contribute to teenage childbearing. I also explore two popular policy proposals for reducing the incidence of teenage childbearing: reducing transfer income and providing sex education courses. The former has only a very small effect on teenage childbearing; the latter is significant only for black adolescents.
Bibliography Citation
McCrate, Elaine. "Expectations of Adult Wages and Teenage Childbearing." International Review of Applied Economics 6,3 (1992): 309-328.