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Source: International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Hartman, Jennifer L.
Turner, Michael G.
Daigle, Leah E.
Exum, M. Lyn
Cullen, Francis T.
Exploring the Gender Differences in Protective Factors
International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 52,3 (June 2009): 249-277
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; Drug Use; Gender Differences; Resilience/Developmental Assets

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Understanding the causes of why individuals desist from or are resilient to delinquency and drug use has become a salient social concern. Much research has centered on the effects that protective factors possess in fostering resiliency but that research has not fully explored how the effects of protective factors might vary across gender. Using a sample of 711 individuals from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, Child-Mother data set, the authors investigate how individual protective factors vary across gender on two measures of resiliency that document the lack of involvement in serious delinquency and drug use. They also examine whether the accumulation of protective factors varies across gender in fostering resiliency. The findings suggest that although males and females rely on different individual protective factors to foster resiliency, the accumulation of protective factors appears to be equally important for males and females in promoting resiliency. The authors discuss theoretical and policy implications. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Hartman, Jennifer L., Michael G. Turner, Leah E. Daigle, M. Lyn Exum and Francis T. Cullen. "Exploring the Gender Differences in Protective Factors." International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 52,3 (June 2009): 249-277.
2. Turner, Michael G.
Phillips, Matthew D.
Tigri, Henry B.
Williams, Meredith A.
Hartman, Jennifer L.
On the Association Between Repeat Bully Victimizations and Carrying a Firearm: Evidence in a National Sample
International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 60,8 (June 2016): 871-896.
Also: http://ijo.sagepub.com/content/60/8/871.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Bullying/Victimization; Childhood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bullying is a significant public concern. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether being repeatedly victimized by a bully during childhood and adolescence is associated with gun carrying in adolescence and adulthood. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, we found that just over one fourth of the respondents reported carrying a gun at some point in their lifetime. Respondents experiencing repeat bully victimizations reported higher rates of gun carrying during the last 12 months and the last 30 days. No support was found for the association of repeat bully victimizations and carrying a gun to school. Individuals victimized during childhood (before the age of 12) and during adolescence were found to be at risk of carrying a gun later in the life course. Repeat bully victimizations should be considered a marker for gun-carrying behaviors in adolescence and adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Turner, Michael G., Matthew D. Phillips, Henry B. Tigri, Meredith A. Williams and Jennifer L. Hartman. "On the Association Between Repeat Bully Victimizations and Carrying a Firearm: Evidence in a National Sample." International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 60,8 (June 2016): 871-896.