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Source: International Journal of Manpower
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina
Mach, Traci Lynn
Performance Pay and Fringe Benefits: Work Incentives or Compensating Wage Differentials?
International Journal of Manpower 24,6 (2003): 673-698.
Also: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0143-7720&volume=24&issue=6&articleid=848396&show=abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MCB University Press
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Insurance, Health; Performance pay; Wages; Wages, Men; Wages, Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Uses longitudinal data from the NLSY79 to examine the effect of a broad variety of performance-based pay schemes and fringe benefits on male and female wages between 1988 and 1998. Specifically, analyzes whether the offer of various performance-based pay schemes and fringe benefits functions as an alternative work incentive, eliciting greater effort and raising wages or, instead, it is accompanied by lower wages, as predicted by compensating wage theory. The results indicate that, while most performance-based pay schemes are associated with higher wages to differing extents across gender, tips are commonly accompanied by lower wages among men. Similarly, while the offer of a retirement plan appears to as a work incentive raising male and female wages, workers are willing to trade wages for jobs offering life and medical insurance.
Bibliography Citation
Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina and Traci Lynn Mach. "Performance Pay and Fringe Benefits: Work Incentives or Compensating Wage Differentials?" International Journal of Manpower 24,6 (2003): 673-698.
2. Artz, Benjamin
Fringe Benefits and Job Satisfaction
International Journal of Manpower 31,6 (2010): 626-644.
Also: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0143-7720&volume=31&issue=6&articleid=1881477&show=abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MCB University Press
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Endogeneity; Job Satisfaction; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Probit

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose -- The paper seeks to empirically identify the theoretically ambiguous relationship between employer fringe benefit provision and worker job satisfaction. Design/methodology/approach -- Using the five most recent waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, both pooled cross-section and fixed effects estimates explain the relationship between fringe benefits and job satisfaction. The potential endogenous relationship is also tested using a recursive bivariate probit procedure. Findings -- Fringe benefits are significant and positive determinants of job satisfaction. The potential endogeneity between fringe benefits and job satisfaction is not shown in this dataset while controlling for fixed effects does not remove the significant impact of fringe benefits. Research limitations/implications -- A limitation is the inability to control for total compensation within the estimations and control for wage changes as a result of fringe benefit provision. Practical implications -- Higher levels of worker job satisfaction, potentially resulting from fringe benefit provisions, have been linked to important productivity measures such as lower quit rates and absenteeism. Originality/value -- The paper is the first to study the relationship between fringe benefits and job satisfaction in detail while additionally testing for the endogeneity of the relationship and controlling for fixed effects. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin. "Fringe Benefits and Job Satisfaction." International Journal of Manpower 31,6 (2010): 626-644.
3. Artz, Benjamin
Relative Supervisor Education and Worker Well-being
International Journal of Manpower 39,5 (2018): 731-745.
Also: https://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abstract/10.1108/IJM-01-2017-0022
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Emerald
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Job Satisfaction; Supervisor Characteristics; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose: Less educated supervisors create worker status incongruence, a violation of social norms that signals advancement uncertainty and job ambiguity for workers, and leads to negative behavioral and well-being outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to compare education levels of supervisors with their workers and measure the correlation between relative supervisor education and worker job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach: Using the only wave of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth that identifies education levels of both supervisor and worker, a series of ordered probit estimates describe the relationship between supervisor education levels and subordinate worker well-being. Extensive controls, sub-sample estimates and a control for sorting confirm the estimates.

Findings: Worker well-being is negatively correlated with having a less educated supervisor and positively correlated with having a more educated supervisor. This result is robust to a number of alternative specifications. In sub-sample estimates, workers highly placed in an organization’s hierarchy do not exhibit reduced well-being with less educated supervisors.

Bibliography Citation
Artz, Benjamin. "Relative Supervisor Education and Worker Well-being." International Journal of Manpower 39,5 (2018): 731-745.
4. Donohue, Susan M.
Heywood, John S.
Job Satisfaction and Gender: An Expanded Specification from the NLSY
International Journal of Manpower 25,2 (2004): 211-235.
Also: http://search.epnet.com/direct.asp?an=14001118&db=buh
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MCB University Press
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Benefits, Insurance; Child Care; Gender Differences; Human Capital; Human Capital Theory; Job Satisfaction; Skills

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Estimates the determinants of job satisfaction for younger US workers. While age representative data from both the USA and Britain routinely show women reporting greater job satisfaction, this is not true for the younger US cohort in National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (ed. note: NLSY79) sample. Finds no gender satisfaction gap, but does find that the job satisfaction of women is less sensitive to both actual and comparison earnings than that of men. Moreover, estimates an expanded specification showing substantial gender differences in the influence of fringe benefit provision (including childcare) on job satisfaction The expanded specification also demonstrates that while general skills are associated with greater job satisfaction, specific skills are associated with lower job satisfaction, argues that the results are it keeping with human capital theory. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Donohue, Susan M. and John S. Heywood. "Job Satisfaction and Gender: An Expanded Specification from the NLSY." International Journal of Manpower 25,2 (2004): 211-235.
5. Dougherty, Christopher
Occupational Breaks, their Incidence and Implications for Training Provision: Case-Study Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
International Journal of Manpower 20,5 (1999): 309-323.
Also: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0143-7720&volume=20&issue=5&articleid=848245&show=abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MCB University Press
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Education; Educational Attainment; Employment, History; Mobility, Job; Occupations; Training, Occupational; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Detailed education, employment and training histories have been constructed for a cohort of 440 male respondents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The employment histories show that most respondents without college degrees have experienced at least one occupational break since entering the labour force. The training histories show that most of those in employment in 1992 have had no formal training for their current occupations. An assessment of whether those who received training before or on entering the labour force have subsequently had more stable employment histories than those who have not shows that this is true of college-level vocational education but not of high school vocational education or training received in vocational/technical institutes. These findings suggest that the comprehensive provision of entry-level training for those not college-bound, as advocated by those promoting vocational education in high schools, cannot be justified in terms of labour market outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Dougherty, Christopher. "Occupational Breaks, their Incidence and Implications for Training Provision: Case-Study Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." International Journal of Manpower 20,5 (1999): 309-323.