Search Results

Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Resulting in 11 citations.
1. Ash-Houchen, William
Lo, Celia C.
Gerling, Heather M.
Cheng, Tyrone C.
Gender and Childhood Victimization: A Longitudinal Study of Heavy Drinking in Young Adulthood
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18 (October 2021): 11089.
Also: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111089
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Bullying/Victimization; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The present longitudinal study, for 12 years, followed a group of young adults, examining (1) whether/how victimization in childhood increased the likelihood of heavy drinking; (2) whether depression mediated the strain-heavy drinking relationship; and (3) whether/how relationships among strain, depression, and heavy drinking differed across two gender groups. Data came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort, dating 2004-2015 (5 interview waves and 22,549 person-wave measurements total). We linked consumption of 5+ drinks (during the month prior) to four discrete measures of violent victimization, to one measure of stressful events, and to depression. We needed to consider repeat measures of the same variables over time, so we used generalized estimating equations (GEE) to analyze data. Depression was found to increase heavy drinking uniformly. Empirical evidence confirmed that in the strain-heavy drinking relationship, depression plays a minor mediating role. Gender moderated heavy drinking's associations. Specifically, bullying in childhood raised risk for female respondents. The current strain was associated with a higher risk of heavy drinking among male respondents. Childhood victimization, as well as current life stress, play an important role in depression and heavy drinking. Future research should focus on the development of specific, targeted care to reduce heavy drinking's harm and promote equity among Americans.
Bibliography Citation
Ash-Houchen, William, Celia C. Lo, Heather M. Gerling and Tyrone C. Cheng. "Gender and Childhood Victimization: A Longitudinal Study of Heavy Drinking in Young Adulthood." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18 (October 2021): 11089.
2. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Neighborhood Disadvantage and Poor Health: The Consequences of Race, Gender, and Age among Young Adults
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19,13 (1 July 2022): 8107.
Also: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19138107
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Neighborhood Effects; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between neighborhood disadvantage and poor self-rated health for a nationally representative sample of Blacks and Whites in young adulthood, 18 to 30 years old. Data were from 16 waves (1997-2013) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (N = 6820 individuals; observations = 58,901). Utilizing the stress process model and generalized estimating equations to account for the correlated nature of multiple responses over time, results show that neighborhood disadvantage increases the odds of poor health for all groups. This positive association is strongest in the most disadvantaged neighborhoods and is heightened as young adults age. There are also notable race and gender differences. For example, Blacks, who live in the most highly disadvantaged neighborhoods, seem to be somewhat shielded from the most deleterious effects of poor neighborhood conditions compared to their White counterparts. Despite greater proportions of Blacks residing in harsh neighborhood environments, Black men experience better health than all other groups, and the health of Black women is no worse compared to White men or women. Limitations and directions for future research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André. "Neighborhood Disadvantage and Poor Health: The Consequences of Race, Gender, and Age among Young Adults." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19,13 (1 July 2022): 8107.
3. Cohen, Alison K.
Ozer, Emily J.
Rehkopf, David
Abrams, Barbara
High School Composition and Health Outcomes in Adulthood: A Cohort Study
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18,7 (2021): 3799.
Also: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/18/7/3799
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; High School; Obesity; School Characteristics/Rating/Safety

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: A multitude of empirical evidence documents links between education and health, but this focuses primarily on educational attainment and not on characteristics of the school setting. Little is known about the extent to which aggregate characteristics of the school setting, such as student body demographics, are associated with adult health outcomes.

Methods: We use the U.S. nationally representative National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort to statistically assess the association between two different measures of high school student composition (socioeconomic composition, racial/ethnic composition) and two different health outcomes at age 40 (self-rated health and obesity).

Results: After adjusting for confounders, high school socioeconomic composition, but not racial/ethnic composition, was weakly associated with both obesity and worse self-rated health at age 40. However, after adding adult educational attainment to the model, only the association between high school socioeconomic composition and obesity remained statistically significant.

Conclusions: Future research should explore possible mechanisms and also if findings are similar across other populations and in other school contexts. These results suggest that education policies that seek to break the link between socioeconomic composition and negative outcomes remain important but may have few spillover effects onto health.

Bibliography Citation
Cohen, Alison K., Emily J. Ozer, David Rehkopf and Barbara Abrams. "High School Composition and Health Outcomes in Adulthood: A Cohort Study." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18,7 (2021): 3799.
4. Daundasekara, Sajeevika Saumali
O'Connor, Daniel P.
Cardoso, Jodi Berger
Ledoux, Tracey
Hernandez, Daphne C.
Risk of Excess and Inadequate Gestational Weight Gain among Hispanic Women: Effects of Immigration Generational Status
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17 (2020): 6452.
Also: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/18/6452
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Hispanic Studies; Immigrants; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

There is a dearth of information on the risk of inadequate and excess gestational weight gain (GWG) among different generations of Hispanic women in the United States. Therefore, the objective of this study was to understand the relationship of GWG and immigration across three generations of Hispanic women. The study was conducted using data from National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). The study sample included 580 (unweighted count) women (148 first-generation, 117 second-generation, and 315 third-/higher-generation). Sociodemographic and immigration data were extracted from the main NLSY79 survey, and pregnancy data were extracted from the child/young adult survey following the biological children born to women in NLSY79. Covariate adjusted weighted logistic regression models were conducted to assess the risk of inadequate and excess GWG among the groups. Average total GWG was 14.98 kg, 23% had inadequate GWG, and 50% had excess GWG. After controlling for the covariates, there was no difference in the risk of inadequate GWG between the three generations. First-generation women (OR = 0.47, p = 0.039) and third-/higher-generation women (OR = 0.39, p = 0.004) had significantly lower risk of excess GWG compared to second-generation women. It is important to recognize the generational status of Hispanic women as a risk factor for excess GWG.
Bibliography Citation
Daundasekara, Sajeevika Saumali, Daniel P. O'Connor, Jodi Berger Cardoso, Tracey Ledoux and Daphne C. Hernandez. "Risk of Excess and Inadequate Gestational Weight Gain among Hispanic Women: Effects of Immigration Generational Status." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17 (2020): 6452.
5. Dev, Saloni
Kim, Daniel
State-Level Income Inequality and County-Level Social Capital in Relation to Individual-Level Depression in Middle-Aged Adults: A Lagged Multilevel Study
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17 (27 July 2020): 5386.
Also: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/15/5386
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Depression (see also CESD); Geocoded Data; Income Level; Social Capital; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the US, the incidence of depression and suicide have followed escalating trends over the past several years. These trends call for greater efforts towards identifying their underlying drivers and finding effective prevention strategies and treatments. One social determinant of health that plausibly influences the risk of depression is income inequality, the gap between the rich and poor. However, research on this association is still sparse. We used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and the US Census to investigate the multilevel lagged associations of state-level income inequality with the individual-level odds of depression in middle-aged adults, controlling for state- and individual-level factors. We also examined the independent associations of county-level social capital with depression and explored whether it mediated the income inequality relationship. Higher income inequality at the state level predicted higher odds of individual-level depression nearly 2 decades later [OR for middle vs. lowest tertile of income inequality = 1.35 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.76), OR for highest vs. lowest tertile = 1.34 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.78)]. This association was stronger among men than women. Furthermore, there was evidence that county-level social capital independently predicted depression and that it mediated the income inequality association. Overall, our findings suggest that policies attenuating levels of income inequality at the US state level and that leverage social capital may protect against one's likelihood of developing depression.
Bibliography Citation
Dev, Saloni and Daniel Kim. "State-Level Income Inequality and County-Level Social Capital in Relation to Individual-Level Depression in Middle-Aged Adults: A Lagged Multilevel Study." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17 (27 July 2020): 5386.
6. Han, Wen-Jui
Wang, Julia Shu-Huah
Changing Employment and Work Schedule Patterns over the 30 Working Years--A Sequential Cluster Analysis
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health published online (21 October 2022): DOI: 10.3390/ijerph192013677.
Also: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/19/20/13677
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Poverty; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective. As labor markets have become increasingly volatile and precarious since 1980s, more workers are susceptible to working conditions such as unpredictable and unstable hours, threatening their economic security. However, our understanding of employment patterns regarding the changes in work schedules over our working lives has yet been established. This study builds our knowledge in this area by paying attention to how social positions may shape the specific work schedule patterns over our working lives.

Methods. We used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979 (NLSY79) to examine our research questions. NLSY79 follows a nationally representative sample of United States men and women between the ages of 14 and 22 when first interviewed in 1979. The participants were then interviewed annually until 1994 and then biennially thereafter. We first conducted a sequence analysis to examine work schedule patterns between ages 22 and 53 (n = 7987). We then used a multinomial logit regression to examine the factors contributing to specific work schedule patterns, with attention to social position.

Results. Our sequence analysis results suggest five work schedule patterns during 31 years of adult life: working only standard hours (25%), mainly standard hours with some portions of nonstandard hours (38%), standard hours during early working years but transitioning to either largely variable or mainly evening or night hours (14% and 13%), and mostly not working (10%). Our multinomial logit analysis indicates that being non-Hispanic Black, having a high school degree or below, or having ever experienced poverty or welfare by age 23 were more likely to have a nonstandard work schedule pattern than their counterparts.

Bibliography Citation
Han, Wen-Jui and Julia Shu-Huah Wang. "Changing Employment and Work Schedule Patterns over the 30 Working Years--A Sequential Cluster Analysis." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health published online (21 October 2022): DOI: 10.3390/ijerph192013677.
7. Jones, Antwan
Race, Socioeconomic Status, and Health during Childhood: A Longitudinal Examination of Racial/Ethnic Differences in Parental Socioeconomic Timing and Child Obesity Risk
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15,4 (April 2018): .
Also: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/15/4/728/htm
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Child Health; Family Income; Obesity; Parental Influences; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prior research suggests that socioeconomic standing during the early years of life, particularly in utero, is associated with child health. However, it is unclear whether socioeconomic benefits are only maximized at very young ages. Moreover, given the link between socioeconomic status (SES) and race, research is inconclusive whether any SES benefits during those younger ages would uniformly benefit all racial and ethnic groups. Using 1986-2014 data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY79), this study examines the impact of socioeconomic timing on child weight outcomes by race. Specifically, this research investigates whether specific points exist where socioeconomic investment would have higher returns on child health. Findings suggest that both the timing and the type of socioeconomic exposure is important to understanding child weight status. SES, particularly mother's employment and father's education, is important in determining child health, and each measure is linked to weight gain differently for White, Black, and Hispanic children at specific ages. Policies such as granting more educational access for men and work-family balance for women are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Jones, Antwan. "Race, Socioeconomic Status, and Health during Childhood: A Longitudinal Examination of Racial/Ethnic Differences in Parental Socioeconomic Timing and Child Obesity Risk." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15,4 (April 2018): .
8. Lee, Jaewon
Maternal Economic Well-Being and Mental Health among Young Adult Children: Race/Ethnicity
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18,11 (2021): 5691.
Also: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18115691
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Children, Mental Health; Depression (see also CESD); Ethnic Differences; Health, Mental; Mothers, Income; Poverty; Racial Differences; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study aimed to examine the relationship between maternal economic well-being and children's mental health outcomes in adulthood and to consider the moderating effect of race/ethnicity. This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 for Children and Young Adults. The two datasets were merged, and 4224 pairs were selected for the final sample. Ordinary linear regression and logistic regression analyses were used. Poverty and lower net worth among mothers were positively associated with their children's depression in young adulthood. Race/ethnicity moderated the relationship between maternal poverty and children's depression. Therefore, women's economic resources may be an important factor in the development of mental health issues among their children in young adulthood. Developing anti-poverty policies that target women may assist in reducing depressive symptoms in their children once they reach young adulthood, specifically for non-Hispanic White children.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon. "Maternal Economic Well-Being and Mental Health among Young Adult Children: Race/Ethnicity." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18,11 (2021): 5691.
9. Lee, Jaewon
Seon, Jisuk
Racial/Ethnic Differences in Health Behaviors and Its Roles on Depressive Symptoms among Young Female Adults
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17 (2020): 7202.
Also: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/19/7202
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Ethnic Differences; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study explores the role of health behaviors on depressive symptoms across young adult females and differences in the relationship across race/ethnicity. The data come from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Child and Young Adult. Seven hundred and seven non-Hispanic White females, 592 African American females, and 349 Hispanic females were selected. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression analyses were conducted. African American and Hispanic females were more likely to eat fast food than non-Hispanic Whites. African Americans reported that they ate fruit less frequently in comparison with non-Hispanic Whites. Fruit intake was related to lower levels of depressive symptoms. Hispanics moderated the association between fruit intake and depressive symptoms. Females should be encouraged to eat more fruit during young adulthood in order to diminish the likelihood of depressive symptoms. In addition, strategies for promoting healthy behaviors should consider the varied effects of race/ethnicity on depressive symptoms among young female adults.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jisuk Seon. "Racial/Ethnic Differences in Health Behaviors and Its Roles on Depressive Symptoms among Young Female Adults." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17 (2020): 7202.
10. Minh, Anita
Bultmann, Ute
Reijneveld, Sijmen A.
van Zon, Sander K.R.
McLeod, Christopher B.
Depressive Symptom Trajectories and Early Adult Education and Employment: Comparing Longitudinal Cohorts in Canada and the United States
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health published online (17 April 2021): DOI: 10.3390/ijerph18084279.
Also: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/18/8/4279/htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Adolescent health; Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY); Cross-national Analysis; Depression (see also CESD); Educational Attainment; Unemployment

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Adolescent depressive symptoms are risk factors for lower education and unemployment in early adulthood. This study examines how the course of symptoms from ages 16-25 influences early adult education and employment in Canada and the USA. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (n = 2348) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 Child/Young Adult (n = 3961), four trajectories (low-stable; increasing; decreasing; and increasing then decreasing, i.e., mid-peak) were linked to five outcomes (working with a post-secondary degree; a high school degree; no degree; in school; and NEET, i.e., not in employment, education, or training). In both countries, increasing, decreasing, and mid-peak trajectories were associated with higher odds of working with low educational credentials, and/or NEET relative to low-stable trajectories. In Canada, however, all trajectories had a higher predicted probability of either being in school or working with a post-secondary degree than the other outcomes; in the USA, all trajectory groups were most likely to be working with a high school degree. Higher depressive symptom levels at various points between adolescent and adulthood are associated with working with low education and NEET in Canada and the USA, but Canadians are more likely to have better education and employment outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Minh, Anita, Ute Bultmann, Sijmen A. Reijneveld, Sander K.R. van Zon and Christopher B. McLeod. "Depressive Symptom Trajectories and Early Adult Education and Employment: Comparing Longitudinal Cohorts in Canada and the United States." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health published online (17 April 2021): DOI: 10.3390/ijerph18084279.
11. Shang, Ce
The Effect of Smoke-Free Air Law in Bars on Smoking Initiation and Relapse among Teenagers and Young Adults
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 12,1 (2015): 504-520.
Also: http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/12/1/504
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: Existing evidence has shown that most smoking uptake and escalation occurs while smokers are teenagers or young adults. Effective policies that reduce smoking uptake and escalation will play an important role in curbing cigarette smoking. This study aims to investigate the effect of smoke-free air (SFA) laws in bars on smoking initiation/relapse while controlling for other confounders.

Methods: The national longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) from 1997-2009 was linked to state-level scores for the strength of SFA laws in order to carry out the analysis.

Results and Conclusion: We find that SFA laws in bars with exemptions significantly reduce (p ≤ 0.01) the probability of smoking initiation (one-puff, daily, and heavy smoking initiation). The 100% SFA law in bars without exemption significantly deters smoking relapse from abstinence into daily smoking (p ≤ 0.05) or relapse from abstinence into heavy smoking (p ≤ 0.01) among people age 21 or older. The reduction of one-puff and daily smoking initiation is larger among ages 20 or younger than ages 21 or older, while the reduction in relapse does not differ by whether respondents reach the drinking age. Results also indicate that higher cigarette taxes significantly reduce daily smoking initiation and relapse into nondaily and light smoking.

Bibliography Citation
Shang, Ce. "The Effect of Smoke-Free Air Law in Bars on Smoking Initiation and Relapse among Teenagers and Young Adults." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 12,1 (2015): 504-520.