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Source: Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Keil, Jacqueline M.
Christie-Mizell, C. André
Beliefs, Fertility, and Earnings of African American, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White Mothers.
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 30,3 (1 August 2008): 299-323.
Also: http://hjb.sagepub.com/content/30/3/299.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Black Studies; Earnings; Fertility; Gender; Hispanics; Mothers, Income; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study explores gender ideology, fertility factors (e.g., age at first birth, number of children), and their effects on earnings of African American (n = 413), Hispanic American (n = 271), and White (n = 817) mothers. An analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth over a 10-year period (1988 to 1998) shows that, on average, Hispanic American and White mothers have a significantly more conservative gender ideology than African American mothers. Nevertheless, a conservative gender ideology significantly reduces African American, Hispanic American, and White mothers' earnings when controlling for a variety of important labor force factors. Regarding fertility, the number of children is detrimental to the earnings of White mothers but has no effect on African American or Hispanic mothers in the sample. Although early childbearing significantly depresses the earnings of African American and Hispanic mothers, it does not do so for their White counterparts. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Keil, Jacqueline M. and C. André Christie-Mizell. "Beliefs, Fertility, and Earnings of African American, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White Mothers." Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 30,3 (1 August 2008): 299-323.
2. Padilla, Yolanda Chavez
Determinants of Hispanic Poverty in the Course of the Transition to Adulthood
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 19,4 (November 1997): 416-432.
Also: http://hjb.sagepub.com/content/19/4/416.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Family Background; Hispanic Studies; Migration; Migration Patterns; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examines the conditions during the transition to adulthood that affect the probability of poverty among Hispanics. Data from the 1988 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth show that factors associated with the socioeconomic resources of the family of origin & individual aptitude at the adolescent state, as well as educational & migration decisions made in the course of transition to adulthood, influence the risk of falling into poverty in young adulthood. On the other hand, although adolescent background is important, the unique placement of young adults in the current labor market also structures their poverty outcomes. 4 Tables, 30 References. Adapted from the source document.
Bibliography Citation
Padilla, Yolanda Chavez. "Determinants of Hispanic Poverty in the Course of the Transition to Adulthood." Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 19,4 (November 1997): 416-432.
3. Pagan, Jose A.
Cardenas, Gilberto
The Role of Occupational Attainment, Labor Market Structure, and Earnings Inequality on the Relative Earnings of Mexican Americans: 1986-1992
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 19,3 (August 1997): 243-267.
Also: http://hjb.sagepub.com/content/19/3/243
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Hispanic Studies; Immigrants; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Occupational Attainment; Wage Gap; Wage Levels

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article analyzes how the 1990-1991 recession and recent changes in U.S. immigration laws may have affected the employment and earnings of Mexican Americans. Using data from the 1986 and 1992 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (n = 2,091), the authors attempt to explain the decline in real earnings experienced by Mexican Americans during this period. The relative earnings of Mexican American males (females) fell from 92.41% (7767%) in 1986 to 82.54% (74.71%) in 1992. Although Mexican Americans seem to be relatively concentrated in low-paying occupations, recent changes in the U.S. wage structure may have worked to offset the observed decrease in relative earnings.
Bibliography Citation
Pagan, Jose A. and Gilberto Cardenas. "The Role of Occupational Attainment, Labor Market Structure, and Earnings Inequality on the Relative Earnings of Mexican Americans: 1986-1992." Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 19,3 (August 1997): 243-267.
4. Schmitz, Mark F.
Influence of Social and Family Contexts on Self-Esteem of Latino Youth
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 28,4 (November 2006): 516-530.
Also: http://hjb.sagepub.com/content/28/4/516.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Children, Academic Development; Children, Home Environment; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Family Structure; Hispanic Studies; Home Environment; Self-Esteem; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The study presented here examines the influence of social and family contexts on the self-esteem of Mexican (n = 287), Mexican American (n = 558), and Puerto Rican (n = 212) children. Using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth, tests of a longitudinal path model show significant social and family effects on the cognitive stimulation and emotional support in the home environment and on academic self-esteem. However, the home environment was not predictive of child global self-esteem and thus did not support the proposed mediator hypothesis. These results indicate that socioeconomic status and family structure influence the presence of a cognitively stimulating and emotionally supportive home environment, but these aspects of the home environment do not influence the development of child self-worth and scholastic self-perception. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Schmitz, Mark F. "Influence of Social and Family Contexts on Self-Esteem of Latino Youth." Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 28,4 (November 2006): 516-530.
5. Schmitz, Mark F.
Velez, Maricruz
Latino Cultural Differences in Maternal Assessments of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Symptoms in Children
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 25,1 (February 2003): 110-112.
Also: http://hjb.sagepub.com/content/25/1/110.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Attention/Attention Deficit; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Health; Children, Behavioral Development; Ethnic Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Many aspects of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are likely influenced by culture, particularly the differences in perceptions of child behavior and the demands of the environment in homes, schools, and communities of people from different ethnic and cultural groups. In particular, ADHD-related behaviors must be understood within the context of cultural environments and expectations. This study examined differences in parental evaluations of ADHD-related child behaviors in the following three Latino ethnic populations: Mexican (n = 81), Mexican American (n = 179), and Puerto Rican (n = 60). Overall, results indicate an important role for acculturation in mothers' perceptions of ADHD-related behaviors but only in the measures of hyperactivity and not in the attention deficit aspects of the disorder. Mothers from different Latino cultures and at different levels of acculturation differentially assess specific symptoms of ADHD, indicating the need for careful reassessment of the validity of the disorder for Latino families.
Bibliography Citation
Schmitz, Mark F. and Maricruz Velez. "Latino Cultural Differences in Maternal Assessments of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Symptoms in Children." Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 25,1 (February 2003): 110-112.
6. Valentine, Sean
Mosley, Gordon
Acculturation and Sex-Role Attitudes Among Mexican Americans: A Longitudinal Analysis
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 22,1 (February 2000): 104-113.
Also: http://hjb.sagepub.com/content/22/1/104
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Racial Differences; Sex Roles

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Following a brief introduction to the acculturation process and Mexican American culture, the authors propose that people of Mexican heritage in the US tend to assimilate rather than integrate with regard to their sex-role attitudes. The authors also propose that the degree of assimilation will be affected by several factors, including generational status and age. The data for this analysis were obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a national sample that was compiled under the direction of the Center for Human Resources and Research at the Ohio State University and the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. The individuals in the sample, which represent the civilian and military population of the US, participated in several annual surveys and interviews that began in 1979 and have continued to the present. Data from a total 1,200 respondents of Mexican, Mexican American, or American descent who participated in the survey in 1979 and then again 1987 were used in this study. Results of the study indicate that the degree of sex-role assimilation among Mexican Americans was affected by generational status and age. (© 2000 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Valentine, Sean and Gordon Mosley. "Acculturation and Sex-Role Attitudes Among Mexican Americans: A Longitudinal Analysis." Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 22,1 (February 2000): 104-113.