Search Results

Source: Family Relations
Resulting in 18 citations.
1. Amato, Paul R.
Meyers, Catherine E.
Emery, Robert E.
Changes in Nonresident Father-Child Contact from 1976 to 2002
Family Relations 58,1 (February 2009): 41-53.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2008.00533.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Child Support; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Involvement; Parental Influences; Parental Marital Status; Parents, Non-Custodial

To study changes in nonresident father contact since the 1970s, we pooled data from 4 national surveys: the National Survey of Children (1976), the National Survey of Families and Households (1987 - 1988), the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1996), and the National Survey of America's Families (2002). On the basis of mothers' reports, levels of contact rose significantly across surveys. Paying child support and having a nonmarital birth were strongly related to contact frequency. The increase in contact may be beneficial in general but problematic if it occurs within the context of hostile interparental relationships. Because nonresident fathers are having more contact with their children now than in the past, an increasing need exists for practitioners to help parents find ways to separate their former romantic roles from their ongoing parental roles and to develop at least minimally cooperative coparental relationships. Reprinted by permission of the publisher.
Bibliography Citation
Amato, Paul R., Catherine E. Meyers and Robert E. Emery. "Changes in Nonresident Father-Child Contact from 1976 to 2002." Family Relations 58,1 (February 2009): 41-53.
2. Barratt, Marguerite Stevenson
School Age Offspring of Adolescent Mothers: Environments and Outcomes
Family Relations 40, 4 (October 1991): 442-447.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/584902
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Children, Academic Development; Educational Attainment; General Assessment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Maternal Employment; Mothers, Adolescent; Parental Influences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty

This research was designed to identify factors contributing to competent parenting by adolescent mothers and optimal outcomes for their school-age children. A sample of 258 first-born 6- and 7-year-old children whose mothers were aged 14 through 18 at the time of their children's births were selected for these analyses from the NLSY. Optimal parenting was influenced by background factors as well as by factors evolving since birth; in turn these factors and parenting influenced outcomes for children. These findings can inform the design of intervention programs for adolescent mothers.
Bibliography Citation
Barratt, Marguerite Stevenson. "School Age Offspring of Adolescent Mothers: Environments and Outcomes." Family Relations 40, 4 (October 1991): 442-447.
3. Bullers, Susan
Selection Effects in the Relationship Between Women's Work/Family Status and Perceived Control
Family Relations 48,2 (April 1999): 181-188.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/585082
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Control; Employment; Family Characteristics; Family Structure; Job Status; Well-Being; Women

Using longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Study of Young Women's Labor Force Experience (NLSYW), this study explores the association between women's work/family status and perceived control, as well as the association between job quality and perceived control among employed women. Selection effects are then tested to determine if early perceived control is more strongly associated with current work/family status than is current perceived control. Findings suggest that current work/family status and current job quality are the strongest correlates of current perceived control and that the effects of early perceived control on current work/family status are minimal. These findings underscore the importance of family structure and women's employment in determining factors that are important to individual well-being.
Bibliography Citation
Bullers, Susan. "Selection Effects in the Relationship Between Women's Work/Family Status and Perceived Control." Family Relations 48,2 (April 1999): 181-188.
4. Christie-Mizell, C. André
Pryor, Erin M.
Grossman, Elizabeth R.B.
Child Depressive Symptoms, Spanking, and Emotional Support: Differences Between African American and European American Youth
Family Relations 57,3 (July 2008): 335-350.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20456797
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Depression (see also CESD); Discipline; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parenting Skills/Styles; Punishment, Corporal; Racial Differences

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth—Mother and Child samples, we explored the relationships among child and adolescent depressive symptoms, spanking, and emotional support offered to youth. We present cross-sectional and change models for both African Americans and European Americans. Findings showed that regardless of race, spanking is associated with more depressive symptoms in the cross-sectional analysis but does not appear to maintain this relationship over time. With regard to emotional support, depressive symptoms for African American youth are inversely related to the emotional support their mothers provide for them in cross-sectional models, but the benefit does not persist in our change models. For European American children and adolescents, emotional support is associated with fewer depressive symptoms in the short term and over time. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Family Relations is the property of Blackwell Publishing Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Christie-Mizell, C. André, Erin M. Pryor and Elizabeth R.B. Grossman. "Child Depressive Symptoms, Spanking, and Emotional Support: Differences Between African American and European American Youth ." Family Relations 57,3 (July 2008): 335-350.
5. Dillard, K. Denise
Pol, Louis G.
The Individual Economic Costs of Teenage Childbearing
Family Relations 31,2 (April 1982): 249-259.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/584404
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Childbearing; Children; Educational Attainment; Fertility; Teenagers; Wages

Although the desire to have children remains high among most Americans, more future parents are beginning to acknowledge the disadvantages of large families and the advantages of small ones. Previous findings on the economic costs of raising children are reviewed and examined especially as they apply to the rapidly growing population of teenage childbearers. Using data from a variety of sources, information was tabulated on the average loss of education by age at first birth, the average annual income and hourly wage for women by educational attainment, the expected annual reduction of income due to low educational attainment, and the direct costs of subsequent fertility. Results showed that children born to teenagers were substantially more expensive than those born to women who delay first births until their twenties.
Bibliography Citation
Dillard, K. Denise and Louis G. Pol. "The Individual Economic Costs of Teenage Childbearing." Family Relations 31,2 (April 1982): 249-259.
6. Furstenberg, Frank F. Jr.
As the Pendulum Swings: Teenage Childbearing and Social Concern
Family Relations 40,2 (April 1991): 127-138.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/585470
Cohort(s): NLS General, NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Data Quality/Consistency; Demography; Heterogeneity; Poverty; Pregnancy, Adolescent

Argues against conclusions drawn by Geronimus from analysis of sisters in the NLSY. This article assesses the evidence for revisionist views of teenage childbearing. These theories suggest that the perception of teenage pregnancy as a growing social problem has been caused by the political agendas of certain interest groups; the consequences of early childbearing have been exaggerated; and that pregnancy among disadvantaged teens may be an adaptive response to poverty. The article first considers demographic patterns and fertility trends that point to why teenage pregnancy and childbearing was regarded as a growing problem in the 1970s. Next, the consequences of early childbearing are considered. Finally, the notion that early childbearing is the desired outcome of a rational choice is considered in light of survey and ethnographic data.
Bibliography Citation
Furstenberg, Frank F. Jr. "As the Pendulum Swings: Teenage Childbearing and Social Concern." Family Relations 40,2 (April 1991): 127-138.
7. Furstenberg, Frank F. Jr.
Teenage Childbearing and Cultural Rationality: A Thesis in Search of Evidence
Family Relations 41,2 (April 1992): 239-243.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/584839
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; Fertility

This article is one of two that continue the dialogue begun by this publication of the Frank Furstenberg, Jr. article titled, "As the Pendulum Swings: Teenage Childbearing and Social Concern," (April) 1991, pp. 127-138, and the Arline Geronimus article titled "Teenage Childbearing and Social and Reproductive Disadvantage: The Evolution of Complex Questions and the Demise of Simple Answers," (October) 1991, pp. 463-471. Here, Furstenberg replies to Geronimus' comments in re: Furstenberg's misresentation of Geronimus' thesis.
Bibliography Citation
Furstenberg, Frank F. Jr. "Teenage Childbearing and Cultural Rationality: A Thesis in Search of Evidence." Family Relations 41,2 (April 1992): 239-243.
8. Geronimus, Arline T.
Teenage Childbearing and Social and Reproductive Disadvantage: The Evolution of Complex Questions and the Demise of Simple Answers
Family Relations 40,4 (October 1991): 463-471.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/584905
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; Health Factors

Rebuttal to Furstenbers's (1991) critique of Geronimus' research on sisters in the NLSY. Scientific progress in understanding the nature of associations between teen childbearing and social or reproductive disadvantage has increased the complexity of this knowledge offered some surprising findings and led to expectable confusion. Assessing these new research findings and incorporating them into appropriate policy debate and development is a challenge complicated by the failure of those translating them for practitioners to do so accurately. Examples of such inadequate translations are discussed in the context of recent findings raising doubts about traditional estimates of the contribution teen childbearing per se makes to social and public health problems. A call for unbiased assessment and open discussion of new research findings is made.
Bibliography Citation
Geronimus, Arline T. "Teenage Childbearing and Social and Reproductive Disadvantage: The Evolution of Complex Questions and the Demise of Simple Answers." Family Relations 40,4 (October 1991): 463-471.
9. Geronimus, Arline T.
Teenage Childbearing and Social Disadvantage: Unprotected Discourse
Family Relations 41,2 (April 1992): 244-248.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/584840
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Childbearing, Adolescent; Fertility

This article is one of two that continue the dialogue begun by this publication of the Frank Furstenberg, Jr. article titled, "As the Pendulum Swings: Teenage Childbearing and Social Concern," (April) 1991, pp. 127-138, and the Arline Geronimus article titled "Teenage Childbearing and Social and Reproductive Disadvantage: The Evolution of Complex Questions and the Demise of Simple Answers," (October) 1991, pp. 463-471. Here, Geronimus replies to Furstenberg's comments.
Bibliography Citation
Geronimus, Arline T. "Teenage Childbearing and Social Disadvantage: Unprotected Discourse." Family Relations 41,2 (April 1992): 244-248.
10. Giles-Sims, Jean
Straus, Murray A.
Sugarman, David B.
Child, Maternal, and Family Characteristics Associated with Spanking
Family Relations 44 (1995): 170-176.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Children, Adjustment Problems; Children, Behavioral Development; Discipline; Home Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Household Composition; Maternal Employment; Mothers, Behavior; Parenting Skills/Styles; Punishment, Corporal; Welfare

This article presents descriptive data on frequency and distribution of spanking by mothers in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Spanking rates are often high for all groups, but patterns also vary by age, sex, SES, marital status, ethnicity, religion, and community type. Policy discussion focuses on reevaluation of spanking norms, arguments for using the term corporal punishment in research and policy, and strategies to reduce the use of physical force as discipline.
Bibliography Citation
Giles-Sims, Jean, Murray A. Straus and David B. Sugarman. "Child, Maternal, and Family Characteristics Associated with Spanking." Family Relations 44 (1995): 170-176. .
11. Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew
Otis, Melanie D.
The Predictors of Parental Use of Corporal Punishment
Family Relations 56,1 (January 2007): 80-91.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4541649
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Neighborhood Effects; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenting Skills/Styles; Punishment, Corporal

Corporal punishment has been the focus of considerable study over the past decade. Some recent research suggesting that the use of corporal punishment may have significant long-term negative effects on children has prompted increasing exploration and interest in the issue. We used tobit regression analysis and data from the 2000 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine both the prevalence and the chronicity of spanking in a nationally representative sample of parents. Mother's characteristics (e.g., age, education) and neighborhood context did not show a relationship with parental use of corporal punishment. Among parents who used corporal punishment, being Protestant had a relatively large relationship with its use. Although children's externalizing behaviors had some association with parent's propensity to spank, findings suggest that use of corporal punishment may be better understood as part of a constellation of behaviors relating to a parenting style. Further, findings indicate that it is easier to predict the incidence of corporal punishment than to predict its frequency of use.
Bibliography Citation
Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew and Melanie D. Otis. "The Predictors of Parental Use of Corporal Punishment." Family Relations 56,1 (January 2007): 80-91.
12. Hofferth, Sandra L.
Goldscheider, Frances Kobrin
Does Change in Young Men's Employment Influence Fathering?
Family Relations 59,4 (October 2010): 479-493.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2010.00617.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Discipline; Employment; Fathers and Children; Fathers, Involvement; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Maternal Employment; Men's Studies; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Punishment, Corporal

This study examined the association between paternal and maternal employment changes and changes in the frequency of fathers praising, showing affection, disciplining, and reading to children. Data were drawn from the Young Adult supplement to the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979). Supporting economic theory, fathers were more involved when they and their partner were employed full time and were less involved when their employment exceeded that of their partner. Although fathers tended to be less involved when they worked less, fathers who held traditional gender role attitudes were more involved than those who held nontraditional gender role attitudes. The results suggest the important part fathers' attitudes and values have in influencing their involvement with children under differing employment conditions. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Family Relations is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Hofferth, Sandra L. and Frances Kobrin Goldscheider. "Does Change in Young Men's Employment Influence Fathering?" Family Relations 59,4 (October 2010): 479-493.
13. Ketterlinus, Robert D.
Lamb, Michael E.
Nitz, Katherine
Developmental and Ecological Sources of Stress Among Adolescent Parents (part of a symposium on: Adolescent pregnancy and parenting)
Family Relations 40,4 (October 1991): 435-441.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/584901
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Stress

This article provides an overview of research on the stresses associated with normative developmental transitions, the effects of psychological stress on adult parenting and parent-child interactions, and the stresses associated with the transition to parenthood during adolescence, with an emphasis on schoo/-age parents. Suggestions are provided for the design of developmentally and ecologically valid research and interventions, and for broadly based public policy addressing the unique problems associated with adolescent parenting.
Bibliography Citation
Ketterlinus, Robert D., Michael E. Lamb and Katherine Nitz. "Developmental and Ecological Sources of Stress Among Adolescent Parents (part of a symposium on: Adolescent pregnancy and parenting)." Family Relations 40,4 (October 1991): 435-441.
14. Krein, Sheila Fitzgerald
Growing Up in a Single-Parent Family: The Effect on Education and Earnings of Young Men
Family Relations 35,1 (January 1986): 161-168.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/584295
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Men
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Earnings; Educational Attainment; Family Influences; Parents, Single

The effect of living in a single-parent family on the educational attainment and earnings of young males is examined, utilizing data from the Mature Women and Young Men. Three specifications of living in a single-parent family are tested, using ordinary least squares analysis on models representing education attainment and earnings. The analyses show that living in a single-parent family has a direct negative effect on education, but only an indirect impact on earnings via education. The effect is strongest among those who lived in one-parent families during the preschool years.
Bibliography Citation
Krein, Sheila Fitzgerald. "Growing Up in a Single-Parent Family: The Effect on Education and Earnings of Young Men." Family Relations 35,1 (January 1986): 161-168.
15. Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.
Bares, Cristina
Delva, Jorge
Parenting, Family Processes, Relationships, and Parental Support in Multiracial and Multiethnic Families: An Exploratory Study of Youth Perceptions
Family Relations 62,1 (February 2013): 125-139.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2012.00751.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Chores (see Housework); Ethnic Differences; Family Characteristics; Family Decision-making/Conflict; Family Process Measures; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Influences; Racial Differences

Mixed-race or multiethnic youth are at risk for mental and physical health problems. We used data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997 to compare family characteristics of adolescents of a mixed-race or multiethnic background with those of a monoracial or monoethnic background. Mixed-race or multiethnic youth reported feeling less supported by parents and reported less satisfactory parent-adolescent relationships. Mixed-race/multiethnic youth were more like monoracial White youth in terms of being independent but were more like racial or ethnic minorities (African Americans, Hispanics) in regard to family activities. Reasons for these findings are explored. We discuss the need for future research on the experiences of mixed-race/multiethnic youth.
Bibliography Citation
Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I., Cristina Bares and Jorge Delva. "Parenting, Family Processes, Relationships, and Parental Support in Multiracial and Multiethnic Families: An Exploratory Study of Youth Perceptions." Family Relations 62,1 (February 2013): 125-139.
16. Mauldin, Teresa A.
Women Who Remain Above the Poverty Level in Divorce: Implications for Family Policy
Family Relations 39,2 (April 1990): 141-146.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/585715
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Divorce; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Income; Marital Disruption; Marital Status; Poverty; Transfers, Skill; Well-Being; Women

This paper explores differences in resources and characteristics of maritally disrupted women who remain above the poverty level following divorce or separation and the effects of such resources and characteristics on per capita income. Comparisons are made between women experiencing an increase vs. a decrease in economic well-being. It was found that per capita income was significantly affected by education, job training, health, and race. Differences in the marginal effects of job training and health among the two groups of women were found. Policy implications are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Mauldin, Teresa A. "Women Who Remain Above the Poverty Level in Divorce: Implications for Family Policy." Family Relations 39,2 (April 1990): 141-146.
17. Pirog-Good, Maureen A.
Amerson, Lydia
The Long Arm of Justice: The Potential for Seizing the Assets of Child Support Obligors
Family Relations 46,1 (January 1997): 47-55.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/585606
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Child Support; Fathers, Absence; Fathers, Presence; Welfare

Discusses the potential for the Child Support Enforcement program in the United States to expand its asset seizure activities by documenting the size and composition of asset portfolios of fathers who live apart from their children. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experiences-Youth Cohort; Work in return for public assistance to families. Full text available online: EBSCO.
Bibliography Citation
Pirog-Good, Maureen A. and Lydia Amerson. "The Long Arm of Justice: The Potential for Seizing the Assets of Child Support Obligors." Family Relations 46,1 (January 1997): 47-55.
18. Tach, Laura
Halpern-Meekin, Sarah
Marital Quality and Divorce Decisions: How Do Premarital Cohabitation and Nonmarital Childbearing Matter?
Family Relations 61,4 (October 2012): 571-585.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2012.00724.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Cohabitation; Divorce; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Modeling, Fixed Effects

This study used the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 3,481) to test whether the association between marital quality and divorce is moderated by premarital cohabitation or nonmarital childbearing status. Prior research identified lower marital quality as a key explanation for why couples who cohabit or have children before marrying are more likely to divorce than other couples. Using event history and fixed-effects models, we found that the effect of marital quality on divorce is similar for cohabitors and noncohabitors, with cohabitors more likely to end both high- and low-quality marriages. In contrast, the relationship between marital quality and divorce is weaker for women with nonmarital births; they are less likely than others to dissolve low-quality marriages. We discuss how commitment norms and self-efficacy might explain these differences in the association between marital quality and divorce.
Bibliography Citation
Tach, Laura and Sarah Halpern-Meekin. "Marital Quality and Divorce Decisions: How Do Premarital Cohabitation and Nonmarital Childbearing Matter?" Family Relations 61,4 (October 2012): 571-585.