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Source: Education Economics
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Averett, Susan L.
Dalessandro, Sharon
Racial and Gender Differences in the Returns to 2-Year and 4-Year Degrees
Education Economics 9,3 (December 2001): 281-292.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09645290110086144
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Carfax Publishing Company ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Economics of Gender; Economics of Minorities; Gender; Human Capital; Occupational Choice; Racial Studies; Training, Occupational; Training, On-the-Job

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 1993 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this paper documents differences in the rate of return to 2-year and 4-year degrees across race and gender. We find for each race and gender group that a baccalaureate degree is more valuable than an associate's degree, and the return to an associate's degree is greater than attending some college, which is in turn more valuable than simply finishing high school. Our results indicate that these effects are statistically different for black and white men. Finally, according to our research, one avenue of low-cost education for women and black men is to attend a 2-year school and then finish the degree at a 4-year institution.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L. and Sharon Dalessandro. "Racial and Gender Differences in the Returns to 2-Year and 4-Year Degrees." Education Economics 9,3 (December 2001): 281-292.
2. Boffy-Ramirez, Ernest
The Heterogeneous Impacts of Business Cycles on Educational Attainment
Education Economics 25,6 (2017): 554-561.
Also: http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09645292.2017.1336511
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; Educational Attainment; Unemployment Rate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the impact of fluctuations in the unemployment rate before high school graduation on educational attainment measured 30 years later. I find evidence that important heterogeneity is masked by estimating average effects across the ability distribution. Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this analysis identifies individuals who are on the boundary between pursuing and not pursuing additional education. Exposure to a higher unemployment rate at age 17 is associated with higher educational attainment for men in the 60-80th quintile of the ability distribution. There is no evidence of an effect beyond this quintile.
Bibliography Citation
Boffy-Ramirez, Ernest. "The Heterogeneous Impacts of Business Cycles on Educational Attainment." Education Economics 25,6 (2017): 554-561.
3. Hazarika, Gautam
The Role of Credit Constraints in the Cyclicality of College Enrolments
Education Economics 10,2 (August 2002): 133-144.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09645290210126887
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Carfax Publishing Company ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Credit/Credit Constraint; Debt/Borrowing; Household Income; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), this paper investigates the effect of plausible credit constraints on the cyclicality of teen college enrolments. It is found that teens from wealthier families are more likely to attend college in regional recessions. However, this countercyclical impetus to enrolments is significantly weaker in teens from less wealthy families. The phenomenon is attributed to credit constraints. Teens from families that possess fewer assets to offer lenders as collateral must finance college mainly with part-time earnings and parental subsidies, sums that may dwindle in recessions, making college less affordable. This paper also examines the influence of regional economic conditions on the type of college attended. In particular, it finds no evidence that teens from less wealthy families favor cheaper community colleges in recessions. Also examined are the effects of regional economic conditions at age 18 on college attainment many years hence. It is found that regional economic conditions at 18 have no significant effect on long-term college attainment. Thus, changes in teen enrolment propensities associated with variation in regional economic conditions are merely timing effects. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Hazarika, Gautam. "The Role of Credit Constraints in the Cyclicality of College Enrolments." Education Economics 10,2 (August 2002): 133-144.
4. Light, Audrey L.
Rama, Apoorva
Moving Beyond the STEM/non-STEM Dichotomy: Wage Benefits to Increasing the STEM-Intensities of College Coursework and Occupational Requirements
Education Economics published online (16 May 2019): DOI: 10.1080/09645292.2019.1616078.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09645292.2019.1616078
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Occupations; STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics); Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a sample of college graduates from the NLSY97, we introduce a new approach to assessing wage benefits of STEM training, STEM jobs, and the match between the two: rather than classify individuals dichotomously as STEM or non-STEM, we measure the STEM-intensities of both their college coursework and their occupational requirements. While the orthodox approach simply predicts that 'STEM pays,' we find that workers at the top of both gender-specific STEM-intensity distributions are predicted to out-earn their counterparts at the bottom by a substantial margin -- even when we condition on their dichotomous STEM classification -- but that predicted log-wages do not increase monotonically with STEM-intensity throughout the entire joint distribution.
Bibliography Citation
Light, Audrey L. and Apoorva Rama. "Moving Beyond the STEM/non-STEM Dichotomy: Wage Benefits to Increasing the STEM-Intensities of College Coursework and Occupational Requirements." Education Economics published online (16 May 2019): DOI: 10.1080/09645292.2019.1616078.
5. Malloy, Liam C.
Loss Aversion, Education, and Intergenerational Mobility
Education Economics 23,3 (2015): 318-337.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09645292.2013.823909
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Carfax Publishing Company ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Debt/Borrowing; Educational Attainment; Family Income; Income; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Existing empirical work looking at the effects of parental income on IQ, schooling, wealth, race, and personality is only able to explain about half of the observed intergenerational income elasticity. This paper provides a possible behavioral explanation for this elasticity in which heterogeneous agents in sequential generations choose their education levels in the face of loss-averse preferences and weak borrowing constraints. These borrowing-constrained agents make education investment choices in part to avoid consumption losses rather than to maximize lifetime resources. The model generates a positive intergenerational income elasticity even when there are functioning capital markets to finance education investments. I find empirical support for the J-shape education decision rule generated by the model and show that it is mostly successful in matching the asymmetric intergenerational transition rates between income quintiles of white families.
Bibliography Citation
Malloy, Liam C. "Loss Aversion, Education, and Intergenerational Mobility." Education Economics 23,3 (2015): 318-337.
6. Register, Charles A.
Williams, Donald R.
Grimes, Paul W.
Adolescent Drug Use and Educational Attainment
Education Economics 9,1 (April 2001): 1-18.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09645290124529
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Carfax Publishing Company ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Drug Use; Educational Attainment; Higher Education; Human Capital; Racial Differences; Schooling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey Youth Cohort, estimates probability of drug use (illicit drugs, hard drugs, and marijuana only) across racial groups in relation to formal educational attainment. Adolescent drug use (in all three categories) reduces their educational attainment by about 1 year. (Contains 21 references.) (MLH)
Bibliography Citation
Register, Charles A., Donald R. Williams and Paul W. Grimes. "Adolescent Drug Use and Educational Attainment." Education Economics 9,1 (April 2001): 1-18.
7. Richey, Jeremiah Alexander
Heterogeneous Trends in U.S. Teacher Quality 1980-2010
Education Economics 23,6 (November 2015): 645-659.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09645292.2014.996120
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Carfax Publishing Company ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Cognitive Ability; Heterogeneity; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper documents changes in the entire ability distribution of individuals entering the teaching profession using the 1979 and 1997 cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and a constructed Armed Force Qualifying Test score that allows direct comparison of ability between cohorts. Such direct comparison between cohorts was previously not possible due to a lack of directly comparable measures of ability. I find there are minimal differences in the ability distribution between cohorts. However, this similarity masks vast differences within specific demographics. I then also decompose these changes into cohort-wide shifts and within-cohort shifts of teachers.
Bibliography Citation
Richey, Jeremiah Alexander. "Heterogeneous Trends in U.S. Teacher Quality 1980-2010." Education Economics 23,6 (November 2015): 645-659.
8. Sandy, Jonathan
Duncan, Kevin Craig
Examining the Achievement Test Score Gap Between Urban and Suburban Students
Education Economics 18,3 (September 2010): 297-315.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09645290903465713
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Carfax Publishing Company ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Achievement; Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Disadvantaged, Economically; Neighborhood Effects; Private Schools; School Quality; Socioeconomic Factors; Urbanization/Urban Living

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience for Youth (1997 cohort) are used to examine the urban school achievement gap. Specifically, we use the Blinder-Oaxaca technique to decompose differences in Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery scores for students who attended urban and suburban schools. We find that approximately 75% of the gap in this achievement measure is explained by the high concentration of disadvantaged students in urban schools. Broken down further, 36% of the gap can be attributed to differences in family background. The lower income of urban families alone explains 25% of the gap. Differences in measures of school quality, such as small classes, large schools, and private school attendance, explain very little of the gap. While current policy focuses on schools and school reform, our results are a reminder that meaningful efforts to improve performance in urban schools must address socioeconomic conditions in urban areas. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Sandy, Jonathan and Kevin Craig Duncan. "Examining the Achievement Test Score Gap Between Urban and Suburban Students." Education Economics 18,3 (September 2010): 297-315.