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Source: Econometric Reviews
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Dong, Yan
Gan, Li
Wang, Yingning
Residential Mobility, Neighborhood Effects, and Educational Attainment of Blacks and Whites
Econometric Reviews 34, 6-10 (2015): 762-797.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07474938.2014.956586#tabModule
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Geocoded Data; Mobility, Residential; Neighborhood Effects; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper proposes a new model to identify if and how much the educational attainment gap between blacks and whites is due to the difference in their neighborhoods. In this model, individuals belong to two unobserved types: the endogenous type, which may move in response to the neighborhood effect on their education; or the exogenous type, which may move for reasons unrelated to education. The Heckman sample selection model becomes a special case of the current model in which the probability of one type of individuals is zero. Although we cannot find any significant neighborhood effect in the usual Heckman sample selection model, we do find heterogeneous effects in our two-type model. In particular, there is a substantial neighborhood effect for the movers who belong to the endogenous type. No significant effects exist for other groups. We also find that the endogenous type has more education and moves more often than the exogenous type. On average, we find that the neighborhood variable, the percentage of high school graduates in the neighborhood, accounts for about 28.96% of the education gap between blacks and whites.
Bibliography Citation
Dong, Yan, Li Gan and Yingning Wang. "Residential Mobility, Neighborhood Effects, and Educational Attainment of Blacks and Whites." Econometric Reviews 34, 6-10 (2015): 762-797.
2. Richey, Jeremiah Alexander
An Odd Couple: Monotone Instrumental Variables and Binary Treatments
Econometric Reviews 35,6 (2016): 1099-1110.
Also: http://tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07474938.2014.977082
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Crime; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Occupations; Treatment Response: Monotone, Semimonotone, or Concave-monotone

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates Monotone Instrumental Variables (MIV) and their ability to aid in identifying treatment effects when the treatment is binary in a nonparametric bounding framework. I show that an MIV can only aid in identification beyond that of a Monotone Treatment Selection assumption if for some region of the instrument the observed conditional-on-received-treatment outcomes exhibit monotonicity in the instrument in the opposite direction as that assumed by the MIV in a Simpson's Paradox-like fashion. Furthermore, an MIV can only aid in identification beyond that of a Monotone Treatment Response assumption if for some region of the instrument either the above Simpson's Paradox-like relationship exists or the instrument's indirect effect on the outcome (as through its influence on treatment selection) is the opposite of its direct effect as assumed by the MIV. The implications of the main findings for empirical work are discussed and the results are highlighted with an application investigating the effect of criminal convictions on job match quality using data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of the Youth. Though the main results are shown to hold only for the binary treatment case in general, they are shown to have important implications for the multi-valued treatment case as well.
Bibliography Citation
Richey, Jeremiah Alexander. "An Odd Couple: Monotone Instrumental Variables and Binary Treatments." Econometric Reviews 35,6 (2016): 1099-1110.