Search Results

Source: Deviant Behavior
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Abeling-Judge, David
Does Military Service Continue to Facilitate Desistance? Revisiting Theory and Practice
Deviant Behavior published online (10 February 2019): DOI: 10.1080/01639625.2019.1575541.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01639625.2019.1575541
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Crime; Military Service

Military service can provide a source of behavioral desistance but may also increase different types of offending behavior. In addition, changes in law and social practice regarding recruitment may hinder the crime reducing effect. I examined the desistance effect of military service in an ongoing longitudinal study, specifically the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. The study identifies limited involvement in service, either in active or reservist capacity, and inconsistent influences on subsequent criminal behavior. The findings expand the relevance of socio-cultural considerations in life-course research and desistance in particular. The current study also suggests opportunities for theoretical re-evaluation of the impact of military service on crime.
Bibliography Citation
Abeling-Judge, David. "Does Military Service Continue to Facilitate Desistance? Revisiting Theory and Practice." Deviant Behavior published online (10 February 2019): DOI: 10.1080/01639625.2019.1575541.
2. Chapple, Constance L.
Vaske, Jamie
Worthen, Meredith G. F.
Gender Differences in Associations with Deviant Peer Groups: Examining Individual, Interactional, and Compositional Factors
Deviant Behavior 35,5 (May 2014): 394-411.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01639625.2014.855098#.Uv0sJhDvDpV
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Discipline; Gender Differences; Neighborhood Effects; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Punishment, Corporal; Self-Regulation/Self-Control; Social Contacts/Social Network; Social Influences

Researchers have long known that boys are more likely to have deviant peers than are girls. Yet, little research has tried to explain why boys and girls differ in their decision to associate with deviant peers. With the salience of deviant peers well established as a robust predictor of delinquency, we address the question, are the predictors of association with deviant peers different for boys and girls? In our examination of family and community processes, individual effects, and peer group composition factors, we find that the predictors of association with deviant peers differ by gender. In addition, our findings suggest gender divergences in the causes of both deviant peer association and deviant peer pressure. We discuss the implications of our research for both theoretical development and appropriate model estimation.
Bibliography Citation
Chapple, Constance L., Jamie Vaske and Meredith G. F. Worthen. "Gender Differences in Associations with Deviant Peer Groups: Examining Individual, Interactional, and Compositional Factors." Deviant Behavior 35,5 (May 2014): 394-411.
3. Crosswhite, Jennifer M.
Kerpelman, Jennifer L.
Parenting and Children's Self-Control: Concurrent and Longitudinal Relations
Deviant Behavior 33,9 (October 2012): 715-737.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01639625.2011.647597
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Discipline; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Modeling, Structural Equation; Parent-Child Interaction; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Self-Regulation/Self-Control

The purpose of the current study was to examine the impact parenting has on the development of self-control, both before and after the general theory of crime suggests self-control is established. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, longitudinal data from mothers with children ages 8–9 and 12–13 were analyzed via structural equation modeling. Results demonstrated an overall environment of effective parenting is associated with (1) self-control before and after it is theoretically established and (2) parenting constructs outside the conceptualization of the theory. Further, the stability of self-control may matter more than parenting in the longitudinal development of self-control.
Bibliography Citation
Crosswhite, Jennifer M. and Jennifer L. Kerpelman. "Parenting and Children's Self-Control: Concurrent and Longitudinal Relations." Deviant Behavior 33,9 (October 2012): 715-737.
4. Hendrix, Joshua A.
Angels and Loners: An Examination of Abstainer Subtypes
Deviant Behavior 37,12 (2016): 1361-1379.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01639625.2016.1177391
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Modeling, Latent Class Analysis/Latent Transition Analysis

Scholars speculate that there may be both prosocial and antisocial modes of abstention; however, few attempts have been made to examine this idea empirically. Using a pooled sample from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, group-based trajectory analysis is presented to identify adolescents who abstain from marijuana, vandalism, violence, and theft during their teenage years, and latent class analysis is used to examine within-group heterogeneity among abstainers. A subset of abstainers report weak peer integration, psycho-emotional instability, worse academic performance, and more conflict with their parents. Implications of findings are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Hendrix, Joshua A. "Angels and Loners: An Examination of Abstainer Subtypes." Deviant Behavior 37,12 (2016): 1361-1379.
5. Hope, Trina L.
Chapple, Constance L.
Maternal Characteristics, Parenting, and Adolescent Sexual Behavior; the Role of Self-Control
Deviant Behavior 26,1 (January/February 2005): 25-46
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Parenthood; Parenting Skills/Styles; Self-Regulation/Self-Control; Sexual Behavior

Gottfredson and Hirschi's general theory of crime has been extensively tested by researchers in the field of criminology, and measures of self-control have been shown to predict crime, delinquency, and deviance. With few exceptions, however, the theory has not been applied to the study of adolescent sexual behavior. Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) and the Children of the NLSY79, this research explores the direct and indirect effects of parenting and self-control on adolescent sexual behavior. Self-control predicts engagement in sexual activity, the number of sex partners, and relationship to last sex partner. Self-control also mediates the relationship between certain parental behaviors and adolescent sexual behavior. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Hope, Trina L. and Constance L. Chapple. "Maternal Characteristics, Parenting, and Adolescent Sexual Behavior; the Role of Self-Control." Deviant Behavior 26,1 (January/February 2005): 25-46.
6. Jennings, Wesley G.
Higgins, George E.
Akers, Ronald L.
Khey, David N.
Dobrow, Jason
Examining the Influence of Delinquent Peer Association on the Stability of Self-Control in Late Childhood and Early Adolescence: Toward an Integrated Theoretical Model
Deviant Behavior 34,5 (May 2013): 407-422.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01639625.2012.735903
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; Behavioral Differences; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Illegal Activities; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Self-Regulation/Self-Control

Gottfredson and Hirschi's (1990) general theory of crime and Akers' social learning theory (1998) have been given considerable attention in the criminological literature. Despite the empirical support for these theories, it is commonplace to test these theories as competing or conflicting theoretical frameworks. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) (N = 629), we examine two related research questions: (1) is self-control relatively stable in late childhood and early adolescence? and (2) does delinquent peer association influence the stability of self-control in late childhood and early adolescence? The results suggest that perhaps a more theoretically integrated approach (social learning and self-control synergistic theory, SSST) is plausible, rather than discussing these two theories as distinct and competing frameworks. Theoretical implications and study limitations are also discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Jennings, Wesley G., George E. Higgins, Ronald L. Akers, David N. Khey and Jason Dobrow. "Examining the Influence of Delinquent Peer Association on the Stability of Self-Control in Late Childhood and Early Adolescence: Toward an Integrated Theoretical Model." Deviant Behavior 34,5 (May 2013): 407-422.
7. Nofziger, Stacey
Newton, Katherine
Self-control, Parental Crime, and Discipline across Three Generations
Deviant Behavior 39,12 (2018): 1533-1551.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01639625.2017.1410616
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Crime; Discipline; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Modeling, Structural Equation; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Self-Control/Self-Regulation

The objective of this study is to examine the relationships between self-control, parental crime, and use of discipline across three generations. Data spanning 30 years from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, are analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling. This study focuses on whether different types of discipline used by parents predict the self-control of each successive generation. We also examine whether self-control and criminal activities of parents are predictive of parenting and resulting self-control of children. We find that discipline has a weak relationship to self-control but that parental crime and self-control do relate to the self-control of later generations.
Bibliography Citation
Nofziger, Stacey and Katherine Newton. "Self-control, Parental Crime, and Discipline across Three Generations." Deviant Behavior 39,12 (2018): 1533-1551.
8. Tapia, Michael
Alarid, Leanne Fiftal
Hutcherson, Donald T., II
Youthful Arrest and Parental Support: Gendered Effects in Straining the Parent–Child Relationship
Deviant Behavior 36,8 (2015): 674-690.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01639625.2014.951584
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Arrests; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Gender Differences; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Influences

Much research confirms the importance of the quality of the parent–child relationship on youth involvement in delinquency. Yet, few have examined this in reverse order, that is, how an arrest for delinquency impacts the parent–child relationship. This article explores the effects of arrest on the child's perceived level of parental support using youth survey data for the nation. Among non-arrested youth, parental support experiences a gradual decline during the early teen years, and a considerable rebound in the late teen years. Among arrested youth, support shows sharper drops and recoveries over the teen years. Controlling for a set of social, legal, and demographic items, we examine the effects of the number of arrests on parental support with multinomial logistic regression, noting several gender effects. First, we find that arrests predict lower levels of support for mothers, but not for fathers. An equally noteworthy finding is that boys report more parental support than girls do, regardless of parent gender.
Bibliography Citation
Tapia, Michael, Leanne Fiftal Alarid and Donald T. Hutcherson. "Youthful Arrest and Parental Support: Gendered Effects in Straining the Parent–Child Relationship." Deviant Behavior 36,8 (2015): 674-690.
9. Tewksbury, Richard
Higgins, George E.
Connor, David Patrick
Number of Sexual Partners and Social Disorganization: A Developmental Trajectory Approach
Deviant Behavior 34,12 (December 2013): 1020-1034.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01639625.2013.800426#preview
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Crime; Neighborhood Effects; Racial Studies; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

Utilizing a developmental trajectory approach, this study examines whether or not the perceived presence of social disorganization within communities contributes to the experience of having multiple sexual partners. The sample consists of African-American self-reports (n = 402) originating from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79). Analysis centers on responses from individuals who were ages 15 to 17 in 1998, 17 to 19 in 2000, 19 to 21 in 2002, 21 to 23 in 2004, 23 to 25 in 2006, and 25 to 27 in 2008. Following trajectory analysis of their reported number of sexual partners and perceptions of social disorganization, three groups are identified, showing variations in perceptions and number of sexual partners. Overall, results from these groups indicate that perceived social disorganization among African Americans has some impact on their number of sexual partners. Implications and directions for future research concerning social disorganization and public health are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Tewksbury, Richard, George E. Higgins and David Patrick Connor. "Number of Sexual Partners and Social Disorganization: A Developmental Trajectory Approach." Deviant Behavior 34,12 (December 2013): 1020-1034.