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Source: Development and Psychopathology
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Colder, Craig R.
Mott, Joshua Adam
Berman, Arielle S.
The Interactive Effects of Infant Activity Level and Fear on Growth Trajectories of Early Childhood Behavior Problems
Development and Psychopathology 14,1 (Winter 2002): 1-23.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=100919&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0954579402001013
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Child Health; Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences; Growth Curves; Temperament

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The current study examined the interactive effects of infant activity level and fear on growth trajectories of behavior problems in early childhood (age 4 to 8 years) using maternal ratings. The sample was drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and included children who were between 1 and 11 months in 1986. Findings suggested that boys characterized by high activity level and low levels of fear in infancy escalated in both externalizing and internalizing symptoms. Also, boys characterized by high fear and low activity level increased in internalizing symptoms and these effects seemed to be specific to depression rather than anxiety. Temperament did not predict escalation in externalizing symptomatology for girls, but low levels of fear predicted increases in internalizing symptoms. There was also evidence for a decline in depression specific symptoms for girls characterized by high fear and low activity in infancy. These findings suggest the importance of examining interactive models of temperament risk and considering gender specific pathways to behavior problems. Copyright ? 2002 Cambridge University Press.
Bibliography Citation
Colder, Craig R., Joshua Adam Mott and Arielle S. Berman. "The Interactive Effects of Infant Activity Level and Fear on Growth Trajectories of Early Childhood Behavior Problems." Development and Psychopathology 14,1 (Winter 2002): 1-23.
2. Crockett, Lisa J.
Moilanen, Kristin L.
Raffaelli, Marcela
Randall, Brandy A.
Psychological Profiles and Adolescent Adjustment: A Person-Centered Approach
Development and Psychopathology 18,1 (Winter 2006): 195-214.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=405290&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0954579406060111
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Depression (see also CESD); Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Risk-Taking; Self-Esteem; Self-Perception; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC); Self-Regulation/Self-Control; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The association between young adolescents' psychological profiles and their subsequent adjustment was examined in a sample of 606 adolescents (ages 12-13) drawn from the mother-child data set of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Cluster analysis was used to identify distinct groups of youth based on self-regulation, proneness to risk, self-worth, and perceived academic competence. Five replicable clusters were identified corresponding to optimal, average, behavioral risk, low self-regulation, and emotional risk groups. These clusters were associated with distinct patterns of adjustment 4 years later. At ages 16-17, youth in the optimal group tended to report better academic performance, less problem behavior, and less depression than youth in the three risk groups; however, their functioning did not differ significantly from youth in the average group. The three risk groups differed in self-reported depression symptoms and academic performance but not in levels of problem behavior. Differences among the five groups persisted when demographic and contextual variables were controlled. These results support the existence of different groups of youth who follow distinct developmental trajectories and may experience different patterns of adjustment. Copyright © 2006 Cambridge University Press
Bibliography Citation
Crockett, Lisa J., Kristin L. Moilanen, Marcela Raffaelli and Brandy A. Randall. "Psychological Profiles and Adolescent Adjustment: A Person-Centered Approach." Development and Psychopathology 18,1 (Winter 2006): 195-214.
3. D'Onofrio, Brian M.
Van Hulle, Carol A.
Waldman, Irwin D.
Rodgers, Joseph Lee
Harden, K. Paige
Rathouz, Paul J.
Lahey, Benjamin B.
Smoking During Pregnancy And Offspring Externalizing Problems: An Exploration of Genetic and Environmental Confounds
Development and Psychopathology 20,1 (Winter 2008): 139-164.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=1641960&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0954579408000072
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Attention/Attention Deficit; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Genetics; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Previous studies have documented that smoking during pregnancy (SDP) is associated with offspring externalizing problems, even when measured covariates were used to control for possible confounds. However, the association may be because of nonmeasured environmental and genetic factors that increase risk for offspring externalizing problems. The current project used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and their children, ages 4-10 years, to explore the relations between SDP and offspring conduct problems (CPs), oppositional defiant problems (ODPs), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity problems (ADHPs) using methodological and statistical controls for confounds. When offspring were compared to their own siblings who differed in their exposure to prenatal nicotine, there was no effect of SDP on offspring CP and ODP. This suggests that SDP does not have a causal effect on offspring CP and ODP. There was a small association between SDP and ADHP, consistent with a causal effect of SDP, but the magnitude of the association was greatly reduced by methodological and statistical controls. Genetically informed analyses suggest that unmeasured environmental variables influencing both SDP and offspring externalizing behaviors account for the previously observed associations. That is, the current analyses imply that important unidentified environmental factors account for the association between SDP and offspring externalizing problems, not teratogenic effects of SDP.
Bibliography Citation
D'Onofrio, Brian M., Carol A. Van Hulle, Irwin D. Waldman, Joseph Lee Rodgers, K. Paige Harden, Paul J. Rathouz and Benjamin B. Lahey. "Smoking During Pregnancy And Offspring Externalizing Problems: An Exploration of Genetic and Environmental Confounds." Development and Psychopathology 20,1 (Winter 2008): 139-164.
4. Quinn, Patrick D.
Harden, K. Paige
Differential Changes in Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking and the Escalation of Substance Use from Adolescence to Early Adulthood
Development and Psychopathology 25, Special Issue 01 (February 2013): 223-239.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8833710
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Alcohol Use; Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Drug Use; Family Income; Genetics; Kinship; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Mothers, Behavior; Risk-Taking; Siblings; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent evidence suggests that impulsivity and sensation seeking are not stable risk factors for substance use among adolescents and early adults but rather that they undergo significant developmental maturation and change. Further, developmental trends of both personality facets may vary across individuals. In the current investigation, we used longitudinal data from ages 15 to 26 on 5,632 individuals drawn from the offspring generation of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine whether interindividual differences in intraindividual change in impulsivity and sensation seeking predicted the escalation of alcohol, marijuana, and cigarette use in adolescence and early adulthood. Latent growth curve models revealed significant individual differences in rates of change in both personality and substance use. Age-related changes in personality were positively associated with individual differences in substance-use change. Individuals who declined more slowly in impulsivity increased in alcohol, marijuana, and cigarette more rapidly, whereas individuals who declined more slowly in sensation seeking increased more rapidly in alcohol use only. Although risk for substance use across the population may peak during adolescence and early adulthood, this risk may be highest among those who decline more gradually in impulsivity.
Bibliography Citation
Quinn, Patrick D. and K. Paige Harden. "Differential Changes in Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking and the Escalation of Substance Use from Adolescence to Early Adulthood." Development and Psychopathology 25, Special Issue 01 (February 2013): 223-239.