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Source: Department of Economics, University of Miami
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Idson, Todd L.
Employer Size and Turnover
Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Miami, 1990
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of Miami
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Job Tenure; Job Turnover; Layoffs; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Quality of Employment Survey (QES); Unions; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates the causes of lower (higher) levels of turnover (tenure) among workers employed by large employers. Four distinct data sets, the Current Population Surveys, the Quality of Employment Survey Panel, the Employment Opportunities Pilot Project, and the NLS of Young Men, are employed to document the structure of the relationship between size of employer and labor mobility, and to evaluate seven different hypotheses that may account for these size differentials.
Bibliography Citation
Idson, Todd L. "Employer Size and Turnover." Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Miami, 1990.
2. Locay, Luis
Regan, Tracy Lynn
Diamond, Arthur M., Jr.
The Effects of Spanish-Language Background on Completed Schooling and Aptitude Test Scores
Working Paper No. 0710, Department of Economics, University of Miami, June 2009
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of Miami
Keyword(s): Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Educational Attainment; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Family Background; Family Influences; Hispanic Youth; Hispanics; Home Environment; Human Capital; Immigrants; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Language Development

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We investigate the effect of speaking Spanish at home as a child on completed schooling and aptitude test scores using data from the NLSY79 on Hispanics who grew up in the U.S. We model the accumulation of traditional human capital and English fluency, leading to the joint determination of schooling and test scores. We find that speaking Spanish at home reduces test scores but has no significant effect on completed schooling. The reduction in test scores: 1) increases in magnitude in three of the tests when the parents are more educated; 2) is much more dramatic when the choice of home language is made endogenous; and 3) is not systematically greater for the verbal than for the math tests.
Bibliography Citation
Locay, Luis, Tracy Lynn Regan and Arthur M. Diamond. "The Effects of Spanish-Language Background on Completed Schooling and Aptitude Test Scores." Working Paper No. 0710, Department of Economics, University of Miami, June 2009.