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Source: Department of Economics, Lafayette College
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Averett, Susan L.
Hotchkiss, Julie L.
The Probability of Receiving Benefits at Different Hours of Work
Working Paper, Easton PA: Department of Economics, Lafayette College, 1995
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, Lafayette College
Keyword(s): Benefits; Benefits, Fringe; Benefits, Insurance; Insurance, Health; Retirement; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Workers' probability of being offered medical, retirement, and life insurance benefits is estimating using a sample from the 1991 NLSY. Exogeneity of workers' wages and hours of work is rejected and thus instrumented out of the benefits equations. We find that the predicted probability of being offered each of these benefits is less than 50 percent for those traditionally defined as full-time employed (working 35 hours per week). This finding has important implications for the success of welfare reform and the impact of health care reform. We also find that for our sample of young workers, women are more likely to be offered each benefit at any given hours.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L. and Julie L. Hotchkiss. "The Probability of Receiving Benefits at Different Hours of Work." Working Paper, Easton PA: Department of Economics, Lafayette College, 1995.
2. Averett, Susan L.
Stifel, David C.
Food for Thought: The Cognitive Effects of Childhood Malnutrition in the United States
Working Paper, Department of Economics & Business, Lafayette College, June 2007. Also presented at the 2006 Annual Conference of the Population Association of America (PAA); 2006 Economics and Human Biology Annual Conference.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, Lafayette College
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Birthweight; Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Endogeneity; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC); Variables, Instrumental; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

An earlier version was presented at the 2006 Population Association of America Annual Conference, the 2006 Eastern Economic Association Annual Conference, and the 2006 Economics and Human Biology Annual Conference.

The U.S. faces two types of childhood malnutrition – the prevalence of overweight children has increased dramatically over the past two decades and the degree of underweight has been unacceptably high. Both forms of malnutrition create public health problems. Less is known about how childhood over- or underweight affects a child's cognitive functioning. We use data from the children of the NLSY79 to investigate the cognitive consequences of child malnutrition. We use several estimation methods to control for various forms of endogeneity. Our results suggest that malnourished children tend have lower cognitive abilities when compared to well-nourished children.

Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L. and David C. Stifel. "Food for Thought: The Cognitive Effects of Childhood Malnutrition in the United States." Working Paper, Department of Economics & Business, Lafayette College, June 2007. Also presented at the 2006 Annual Conference of the Population Association of America (PAA); 2006 Economics and Human Biology Annual Conference.