Search Results

Source: Criminal Justice and Behavior
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Abeling-Judge, David
Different Social Influences and Desistance From Crime
Criminal Justice and Behavior 43,9 (September 2016): 1225-1241.
Also: http://cjb.sagepub.com/content/43/9/1225
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Arrests; Crime; Employment; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Desistance from crime has been associated with numerous social influences. Although researchers have explored different theoretical rationales and underlying mechanisms between external social developments and individual changes in behavior, little focus has been given to the individual versus cumulative influences, and social complexities, of different informal controls influencing reduction in criminal behavior. The current study explores the individual and combined impact of marriage and employment on arrest using 17 years of monthly level data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997). The results address isolated and cumulative influences of each social control on arrest and provide insight into the relevance of acknowledging the complexities of social events developing over time.
Bibliography Citation
Abeling-Judge, David. "Different Social Influences and Desistance From Crime." Criminal Justice and Behavior 43,9 (September 2016): 1225-1241.
2. Mears, Daniel P.
Cochran, Joshua C.
What Is the Effect of IQ on Offending?
Criminal Justice and Behavior 40,11 (November 2013): 1280-1300.
Also: http://cjb.sagepub.com/content/40/11/1280.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Crime; I.Q.; Propensity Scores; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The aim of this study is to advance scholarship on the IQ–offending relationship by examining the functional form of this relationship and whether confounding introduced by socioeconomic status (SES) and other factors can be adequately addressed. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are analyzed using generalized propensity score and propensity score matching analyses. The results suggest that the relationship is curvilinear, such that lower and higher levels of IQ are associated with lower levels of offending. They also indicate that the distribution of confounders, especially SES, may limit the ability of statistical approaches to arrive at unbiased estimates of IQ effects.
Bibliography Citation
Mears, Daniel P. and Joshua C. Cochran. "What Is the Effect of IQ on Offending?" Criminal Justice and Behavior 40,11 (November 2013): 1280-1300.
3. Stevens Andersen, Tia
Race, Ethnicity, and Structural Variations in Youth Risk of Arrest: Evidence From a National Longitudinal Sample
Criminal Justice and Behavior 42,9 (September 2015): 900-916.
Also: http://cjb.sagepub.com/content/42/9/900
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Arrests; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Ethnic Differences; Geocoded Data; Racial Differences; Unemployment Rate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Missing from the considerable body of literature on disproportionate minority contact is an examination of the factors that influence risk of juvenile arrest. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, the author examines racial/ethnic disparities in youth arrest, net of self-reported delinquency. Drawing from research using a minority threat perspective, this study examines whether disparities are exacerbated by macro levels of the relative size of the minority population and minority economic inequality. The results indicate Black youth have a higher risk of arrest than White youth in all contextual climates, but this disparity is magnified in predominantly non-Black communities. Differences between Hispanic and White youths' risk of arrest did not reach statistical significance or vary across communities. The findings failed to yield support for the threat perspective but strongly supported the benign neglect thesis. Implications for theory and future research are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Stevens Andersen, Tia. "Race, Ethnicity, and Structural Variations in Youth Risk of Arrest: Evidence From a National Longitudinal Sample." Criminal Justice and Behavior 42,9 (September 2015): 900-916.
4. Turner, Michael G.
Hartman, Jennifer L.
Bishop, Donna M.
Effects of Prenatal Problems, Family Functioning, and Neighborhood Disadvantage in Predicting Life-Course-Persistent Offending
Criminal Justice and Behavior 34,10 (2007): 1241-1261
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Disadvantaged, Economically; Family Environment; Illegal Activities; Life Course; Mothers, Health; Neighborhood Effects; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research examining Moffitt's dual taxonomy theory of offending has generally supported the idea that neuropsychological deficits interact with disadvantaged familial environments to predict life-course-persistent offending. Most research, however, has neglected to investigate the power of this interaction across different neighborhood and racial contexts. Using data extracted from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, Moffitt's biosocial hypothesis is tested across different neighborhood and racial contexts. The findings indicate that the biosocial interaction predicts life-course-persistent offending only among non-Whites in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Stated differently, macro-level structural factors appear to moderate the effects of individual and family risks. That poor non-Whites reside in neighborhoods that are ecologically distinct from those in which poor Whites reside exacerbates the criminogenic effects of individual-level deficits and family disadvantage.
Bibliography Citation
Turner, Michael G., Jennifer L. Hartman and Donna M. Bishop. "Effects of Prenatal Problems, Family Functioning, and Neighborhood Disadvantage in Predicting Life-Course-Persistent Offending." Criminal Justice and Behavior 34,10 (2007): 1241-1261.
5. Wong, Jennifer S.
Schonlau, Matthias
Does Bully Victimization Predict Future Delinquency? A Propensity Score Matching Approach
Criminal Justice and Behavior 40,11 (November 2013): 1184-1208.
Also: http://cjb.sagepub.com/content/40/11/1184.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Bullying/Victimization; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Propensity Scores

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Over the past decade school bullying has emerged as a prominent issue of concern for students, parents, educators, and researchers. Bully victimization has been linked to a long list of negative outcomes, such as depression, peer rejection, school dropout, eating disorders, delinquency, and violence. Previous research relating bully victimization to delinquency has typically used standard regression techniques that may not sufficiently control for heterogeneity between bullied and nonbullied youths. Using a large, nationally representative panel dataset, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), we use a propensity score matching technique to assess the impact of bully victimization on a range of delinquency outcomes. Results show that 19% of respondents had been victimized prior to the age of 12 years (n = 8,833). Early victimization is predictive of the development of 6 out of 10 delinquent behaviors measured over a period of 6 years, including assault, vandalism, theft, other property crimes (such as receiving stolen property or fraud), selling drugs, and running away from home. Bully victimization should be considered an important precursor to delinquency.
Bibliography Citation
Wong, Jennifer S. and Matthias Schonlau. "Does Bully Victimization Predict Future Delinquency? A Propensity Score Matching Approach." Criminal Justice and Behavior 40,11 (November 2013): 1184-1208.