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Source: City and Community
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. VonLockette, Niki T. Dickerson
The Impact of Metropolitan Residential Segregation on the Employment Chances of Blacks and Whites in the United States
City and Community 9,3 (September 2010): 256-273.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-6040.2010.01332.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Employment; Family Characteristics; Family Studies; Gender Differences; Racial Differences; Residence; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Most tests of residential segregation\'s role in creating employment inequality between blacks and whites have focused on neighborhood characteristics (e.g. mean SES or distance from job centers), whereas this study considers the broader structure of residential segregation in which neighborhoods are situated and its implication in black/white disparities in access to employment opportunities. The study employs multilevel analyses and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to test the effects of metropolitan segregation in 1979 on respondents\' probability of being employed by 1990 net of individual and family level characteristics, and to assess the role of segregation in explaining the race gap in employment between blacks and whites. The analyses reveal that residential segregation decreases employment odds for blacks and not for whites and explains the residual race gap in the probability of being employed. The depressive effect of segregation on employment is weaker for black women than it is for black men.
Bibliography Citation
VonLockette, Niki T. Dickerson. "The Impact of Metropolitan Residential Segregation on the Employment Chances of Blacks and Whites in the United States." City and Community 9,3 (September 2010): 256-273.
2. Warner, Cody
The Effect of Incarceration on Residential Mobility between Poor and Nonpoor Neighborhoods
City and Community 15,4 (December 2016): 423-443.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cico.12207/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Geocoded Data; Incarceration/Jail; Mobility, Residential; Neighborhood Effects; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the impact of incarceration on residential mobility between poor and nonpoor neighborhoods. Formerly incarcerated individuals move at high rates, but little is known about if or how incarceration impacts movement between neighborhoods of varying quality. I ground my approach in traditional accounts of locational attainment that emphasize pathways and barriers between poor and nonpoor neighborhoods. Results show that incarceration leads to downward neighborhood mobility from nonpoor into poor neighborhoods. Incarceration does not appear to trap formerly incarcerated individuals in poor neighborhoods. Additional analyses show that the effect of incarceration is initially strongest among formerly incarcerated whites, but that there is significant racial variation in neighborhood mobility across time. My results provide evidence that incarceration should be placed alongside human capital characteristics and structural barriers as an important predictor of mobility between poor and nonpoor neighborhoods.
Bibliography Citation
Warner, Cody. "The Effect of Incarceration on Residential Mobility between Poor and Nonpoor Neighborhoods." City and Community 15,4 (December 2016): 423-443.