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Source: Childhood Obesity
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Lazorick, Suzanne
Crawford, Yancey
Gilbird, Anthony
Fang, Xiangming
Burr, Veronica
Moore, Valeria
Hardison, George T.
Long-term Obesity Prevention and the Motivating Adolescents with Technology to CHOOSE Health™ Program
Childhood Obesity 10,1 (February 2014): 25-33.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24325403
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent health; Body Mass Index (BMI); Comparison Group (Reference group); Obesity; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

BACKGROUND: The Motivating Adolescents with Technology to CHOOSE Health™ (MATCH) intervention integrates lifestyle behavior change curriculum within academic subjects taught in seventh grade. This study assesses obesity prevention in participants into high school.

METHODS: The study compares four- to five-year longitudinal data from a single-site cohort (N=106, 54% retained from 195 participants at baseline; 82% of those still at the school) pre- and postintervention in a rural middle school with high obesity rates with data from the 2006 Child Survey and 2010 Child and Young Adult Surveys from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (N=600), which serves as a nationally representative comparison group. Outcome measures include pre- and postchanges in weight category, BMI, BMI z-score, BMI percentile for age and gender, and rates of change per month in BMI measures.

RESULTS: At follow-up, change in percent overweight was significantly different between groups, with the MATCH group decreasing (20-12%) and the comparison group increasing (17-19%). Overall, the MATCH group had significantly higher decrease rates in BMI z-scores (p=0.002) and BMI percentile (p=0.01) than the comparison group. Of all adolescents at healthy weight at baseline, 2% from MATCH became overweight after five years, whereas 13% of the comparison group increased to overweight or obese (p=0.02) after four years.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite a small sample size and a high-risk setting, at long-term follow-up, a greater proportion of MATCH participants than in the comparison group decreased from overweight to healthy weight or remained at healthy weight. The MATCH results suggest that some proportion of high-risk adolescents can have their growth trajectory follow a healthier path than expected.

Bibliography Citation
Lazorick, Suzanne, Yancey Crawford, Anthony Gilbird, Xiangming Fang, Veronica Burr, Valeria Moore and George T. Hardison. "Long-term Obesity Prevention and the Motivating Adolescents with Technology to CHOOSE Health™ Program." Childhood Obesity 10,1 (February 2014): 25-33.
2. Leonard, Stephanie
Petito, Lucia C.
Rehkopf, David
Ritchie, Lorrene
Abrams, Barbara
Maternal History of Child Abuse and Obesity Risk in Offspring: Mediation by Weight in Pregnancy
Childhood Obesity 13,4 (August 2017): 259-266.
Also: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28440693
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Body Mass Index (BMI); Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Gestation/Gestational weight gain; Health, Mental; Household Influences; Obesity; Parental Influences; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Among every 100 mothers who reported physical abuse in childhood, there were 3.7 (95% confidence interval: -0.1 to 7.5) excess cases of obesity in 2- to 5-year olds compared with mothers who did not report physical abuse. Differences in prepregnancy BMI, but not gestational weight gain, accounted for 25.7% of these excess cases. There was no evidence of a similar relationship for household alcoholism or mental illness or for obesity in older children.
Bibliography Citation
Leonard, Stephanie, Lucia C. Petito, David Rehkopf, Lorrene Ritchie and Barbara Abrams. "Maternal History of Child Abuse and Obesity Risk in Offspring: Mediation by Weight in Pregnancy." Childhood Obesity 13,4 (August 2017): 259-266.