Search Results

Source: Child Trends, Inc.
Resulting in 16 citations.
1. Driscoll, Anne K.
Moore, Kristin Anderson
The Relationship of Welfare Receipt to Child Outcomes
Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, June 1997.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED428859&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED428859
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Cognitive Ability; Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty; Racial Differences; Welfare

ED428859
Receipt of welfare is often negatively correlated with children's outcomes. Yet, virtually all children who live in households that receive public assistance are poor, giving rise to the question of whether poor outcomes are truly an effect of welfare, a spurious relationship between welfare and child outcomes, or a result of welfare selection factors. Using children in the NLSY-CS aged 9-14 in 1992, these possibilities are examined by controlling for poverty and for selection onto welfare. Controlling for child and maternal characteristics accounts for the majority of bivariate negative associations between welfare and cognitive ability and behaviors problems among black children. Controlling for poverty does little to change the negative relationship between welfare and measures of children's academic achievement and behavior problems for either blacks or whites. Controlling for selection onto welfare, through a two-stage selection model, reduces, but does not eliminate the negative relationship between welfare receipt and outcomes among white children and has little discernible effect among black children.
Bibliography Citation
Driscoll, Anne K. and Kristin Anderson Moore. "The Relationship of Welfare Receipt to Child Outcomes." Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, June 1997.
2. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Ling, Thomson J.
McPhee-Baker, Cameron
Brown, Brett V.
Youth Who Are "Disconnected" and Those Who Then Reconnect: Assessing the Influence of Family, Programs, Peers and Communities
Publication #2009-37, Child Trends Research Brief, July 2009.
Also: http://www.childtrends.org/files/child_trends-2009_07_22_rb_disconnectedyouth.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Disadvantaged, Economically; Disconnected Youth; Health Factors; Job Training; Support Networks; Transition, Adulthood; Transition, School to Work; Vocational Education; Vocational Training; Youth Problems

Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, Kristin Anderson Moore, Thomson J. Ling, Cameron McPhee-Baker and Brett V. Brown. "Youth Who Are "Disconnected" and Those Who Then Reconnect: Assessing the Influence of Family, Programs, Peers and Communities." Publication #2009-37, Child Trends Research Brief, July 2009.
3. Mariner, Carrie L.
Zaslow, Martha J.
Sugland, Barbara W.
Factor Structure and Predictive Validity of the HOME-Short Form for Three Racial/Ethnic Groups in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Methods Working Paper #98.2, Child Trends, Inc., Washington,DC, May 1998.
Also: http://www.childtrends.org/files/pubs/1998-08FactorStructureandPredictiveValidityoftheHOME.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Family Structure; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Racial Differences

When examining the effectiveness of parenting measures, the degree to which the measure is valid across racial/ ethnic groups is a critical issue to consider. Although some investigators have expressed concerns with validity of the HOME- Short Form across racial/ ethnic groups, the issue has not been systematically analyzed.

The purpose of this working paper is to examine the comparability across three major racial/ethnic groups (European American, African American, and Mexican American) of the factor structure and predictive validity of three versions of the HOME-Short Form (infant/toddler, early childhood, and middle childhood versions) used in the 1988 wave of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement. Factor analyses were carried out examining the factor structure in the full sample and for each racial/ethnic subgroup separately. In the early childhood and middle childhood versions of the HOME-Short Form, there is great similarity in the factor structures found for the three racial/ethnic groups and for the sample as a whole. This is not the case, however, for the infant/toddler version. Prediction to child outcomes in longitudinal analyses was comparable when scales were created based on full-sample factor analyses and on factor analyses for separate racial/ethnic groups. That is, use of race/ethnicity-specific scales did not improve prediction. It is noteworthy, however, that the particular subscales that served as significant predictors of the child behavioral and cognitive outcomes differed for the three racial/ethnic groups.

In general, the findings indicate that while the same underlying constructs appear to exist in parenting behavior and the home environment across racial/ethnic groups (except in very early development), these constructs do not relate to later developmental outcomes in the same way across groups. Rather, different aspects of parenting and the home environment serve as the strongest predictors of development for each group.

Bibliography Citation
Mariner, Carrie L., Martha J. Zaslow and Barbara W. Sugland. "Factor Structure and Predictive Validity of the HOME-Short Form for Three Racial/Ethnic Groups in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Methods Working Paper #98.2, Child Trends, Inc., Washington,DC, May 1998.
4. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Glei, Dana A.
Driscoll, Anne K.
Zaslow, Martha J.
Ebbing and Flowing, Learning and Growing: Transitions in Family Economic Resources and Children's Development
Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, 1998.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/17/88/f0.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Educational Attainment; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Siblings

ED429683
Transitions into and out of poverty and welfare across a four-year time periods and their implications for math and reading skills and behavior are examined among a sample of ten and eleven year-olds. Analyses of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement indicate that even with controls for factors that select families into poverty, children who do not experience poverty or welfare over this time period are advantaged relative to children who experience either. Children who are continuously poor but never receive welfare have more favorable outcomes than poor children who receive welfare. Among children experiencing changing economic circumstances, if the family manages to leave poverty, child outcomes are more positive; children whose families fall into poverty experience more negative outcomes than children living consistently above the poverty line. Fluctuations in family economic circumstances are also associated with poorer child outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Dana A. Glei, Anne K. Driscoll and Martha J. Zaslow. "Ebbing and Flowing, Learning and Growing: Transitions in Family Economic Resources and Children's Development." Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, 1998.
5. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Glei, Dana A.
Driscoll, Anne K.
Zaslow, Martha J.
Poverty and Welfare Patterns: Implications for Children
Welfare and Poverty Paper 2000-07, Washington DC: Child Trends, Inc., 2000
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty; Welfare

To provide early insight into the possible implications of welfare reform for children, patterns of welfare receipt and poverty among a sample of ten and eleven year-olds are examined in detail across a four-year time period. Children's math and reading skills and behavior problems are analyzed using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement. Results indicate that early childhood experiences and maternal characteristics are powerful determinants of children's outcomes. Net of these selection factors, children who experienced stable albeit disadvantaged economic conditions did not have worse outcomes than those who were never poor. Children whose families' economic fortunes improved were not at higher risk for poor outcomes. However, children in families whose financial circumstances declined were more at risk for behavioral problems and scored lower on reading tests than never poor children, as did children whose situations fluctuated.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Dana A. Glei, Anne K. Driscoll and Martha J. Zaslow. "Poverty and Welfare Patterns: Implications for Children." Welfare and Poverty Paper 2000-07, Washington DC: Child Trends, Inc., 2000.
6. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Guzman, Lina
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Lippman, Laura
Garrett, Sarah Bracey
Parent-Teen Relationships and Interactions: Far More Positive Than Not
Publication # 2004-25, Child Trends Research Brief, Child Trends Inc, December 2004.
Also: http://www.childtrends.org/Files/Parent_TeenRB.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Children, Well-Being; Health, Mental; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness

ED484689
This Research Brief brings together recent results of a nationally representative survey of U.S. teens about the nature of their relationships with their parents and findings from rigorous research studies on the parent-adolescent bond. The evidence presented shows that while the proportion of teens reporting positive relationships with their parents does dip somewhat during the early teen years and while this proportion is lower for parents who live apart from their children, adolescents, in general, respect, admire, and like their parents and enjoy spending time with them. These results from interviews with teens dovetail with research showing the link between the quality of parent-child relationships and a wide range of positive outcomes for teens. Moreover, this research is reinforced by similar findings in industrialized countries elsewhere in the world, which are also reported on in this brief.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Lina Guzman, Elizabeth Catherine Hair, Laura Lippman and Sarah Bracey Garrett. "Parent-Teen Relationships and Interactions: Far More Positive Than Not." Publication # 2004-25, Child Trends Research Brief, Child Trends Inc, December 2004.
7. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Morrison, Donna Ruane
Greene, Angela Dungee
Children Born to Teenage Mothers: Analyses of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - Child Supplement and the National Survey of Children
Report, Child Trends, Washington DC, January 1995.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED415998&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED415998
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Age at Birth; Age at First Birth; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Child Health; Childbearing, Adolescent; Children, Health Care; Children, Mental Health; Children, Well-Being; Cognitive Development; Educational Attainment; Family Environment; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Mothers, Behavior; National Survey of Children (NSC); Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Influences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Runaways; Sexual Behavior; Substance Use

ED415998
This study compared the well-being of children born to mothers younger than 17 years old(very young teens), 18 to 19 years old (older teens), and mothers in their early twenties. Measures of well-being were assessed in five domains: (1) health and psychological well-being; (2) quality of home environment; (3) cognitive development and educational attainment; (4) behavior problems and substance abuse; and (5) sexual experiences and first births. The study also examined the effects of mother's age at first birth on child well-being. Data were drawn from the Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement (NLSY-CS) and the National Survey of Children (NSC). Major findings indicated that although controlling for maternal background characteristics reduced the effects of teen motherhood on child well-being, the deleterious effect of being born to young teens remained statistically significant on children's cognitive achievement scores, grade repetition, teacher rating of school performance, and home environment quality. The deleterious consequences of teen childbearing extended to their subsequent children. There was a persistently negative effect of early childbearing in the cognitive domain. The NLSY-CS revealed that 4- to 14-year-old children of the youngest teens performed more poorly on tests of cognitive ability, and NSC results showed that the offspring of teens were more likely to be retained and less likely to be perceived by their teachers as performing favorably in high school. Behavior difficulties such as running away, early sexual activity, and teen motherhood emerged among children in the NSC.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Donna Ruane Morrison and Angela Dungee Greene. "Children Born to Teenage Mothers: Analyses of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - Child Supplement and the National Survey of Children." Report, Child Trends, Washington DC, January 1995.
8. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Morrison, Donna Ruane
Zaslow, Martha J.
Glei, Dana A.
Ebbing and Flowing, Learning and Growing: Transitions in Family Economic Resources and Children's Development
Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, September 1995
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Child Development; Children, Well-Being; Cognitive Development; Family Background; Family Resources; Family Studies; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty; Welfare

Revised and under review. Direct correspondence to Kristin A. Moore, 4301 Connecticut Ave., Suite 100, Washington DC, 20008. This paper examines transitions into and from welfare and poverty across the time period from 1986 to 1990. and their implications for children's math achievement, reading skills, and behavior and the level of emotional support and cognitive stimulation provided in children's homes. Analyses of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement indicate that even with controls for factors that select family into poverty, children who do not experience poverty or welfare over this time period are advantaged relative to children who experience poverty or welfare; and that children who are continuously poor but never receive welfare have fewer behavior problems as reported by their mothers than children who receive welfare. Among children experiencing changing economic circumstances, if the family manages to leave poverty child outcomes are more positive; and children whose families fall from above the poverty level into welfare experience high levels of behavior problems. Frequent fluctuations in family economic circumstances are also associated with poorer child outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Donna Ruane Morrison, Martha J. Zaslow and Dana A. Glei. "Ebbing and Flowing, Learning and Growing: Transitions in Family Economic Resources and Children's Development." Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, September 1995.
9. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Snyder, Nancy O.
Cognitive Development among the Children of Adolescent Mothers
Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Birthweight; Child Development; Childbearing; Children; Children, Academic Development; Children, Home Environment; Hispanics; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Mothers, Adolescent; Racial Differences; Teenagers

The consequences of early childbearing for the intellectual achievement of young children are examined. Earlier studies have suggested that mothers who were early childbearers and those who are high-school dropouts have children who fare worse than the children of older mothers and those who were progressing normally in school. Data on the children born to women in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, together with week-by-week school enrollment data for each mother, allowed the examination of this hypothesis. Separate analyses of black, Hispanic, and non-minority children were made. Children's cognitive abilities were most strongly predicted by the mother's cognitive test score. Mother's age at first birth and school enrollment status at conception proved to be less important predictors of the child's cognitive score compared to the powerful prediction made by her Armed Forces Qualifying Test score. While environmental factors were relatively weak predictors, measures of the stimulating nature of the child's home increased the predictive power in regression sets. It must be concluded that there is strong selectivity into school failure and teenage parenthood; and that the low parental ability as measured here is clearly evident in the next generation.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson and Nancy O. Snyder. "Cognitive Development among the Children of Adolescent Mothers." Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, 1991.
10. Morrison, Donna Ruane
Glei, Dana A.
Assessing Family Strengths in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - Child Supplement
Working Paper, Washington DC: Child Trends, June 1993.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/15/2e/82.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Family Studies; Gender Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Labor Market Outcomes; Marital Stability; Methods/Methodology; Mothers, Income; Self-Esteem; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC); Siblings; Wage Rates; Work Hours

ED415994
In this paper we develop and estimate a factor model of the earnings, labor supply, and wages of young men and young women, their parents and their siblings. We estimate the model using data on matched sibling and parent-child pairs from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience. We measure the extent to which a set of unobserved parental and family factors that drive wage rates and work hours independently of wage rates lead to similarities among family members in labor market outcomes. We find strong family similarities in work hours that run along gender lines. These similarities are primarily due to preferences rather than to labor supply responses to family similarities in wages. The wage factors of the father and mother influence the wages of both sons and daughters. A 'sibling' wage factor also plays an important role in wage determination. We find that intergenerational correlations in wages substantially overestimate the direct influence of fathers, and especially mothers, on wages. This is because the father's and mother's wage factors are positively correlated. The relative importance for the variance in earnings of the direct effect of wages, the labor supply response induced by wages, and effect of hours preferences varies by gender, and by age in the case of women. For all groups most of the effect of wages on earnings is direct rather than through a labor supply response.
Bibliography Citation
Morrison, Donna Ruane and Dana A. Glei. "Assessing Family Strengths in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - Child Supplement." Working Paper, Washington DC: Child Trends, June 1993.
11. Perper, Kate
Peterson, Kristen
Manlove, Jennifer S.
Diploma Attainment Among Teen Mothers
Child Trends Factsheet Publication #2010-01, Child Trends, Washington, DC, January 2010.
Also: http://www.childtrends.org/Files/Child_Trends-2010_01_22_FS_DiplomaAttainment.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; Children, Academic Development; Children, Behavioral Development; Ethnic Differences; Family Structure; GED/General Educational Diploma/General Equivalency Degree/General Educational Development; High School Diploma; Mothers, Adolescent; Mothers, Education; Racial Differences; Welfare

OVERVIEW. Recently released government data show that in 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate began to increase, marking the end of a 14-year period of decline. More specifically, these data show that between 2005 and 2007, the teen birth rate climbed five percent. This trend reversal is a cause for concern, given the negative consequences of teen childbearing for the mothers involved and for their children especially. For example, research indicates that children of teen mothers fare worse on cognitive and behavioral outcomes than do their peers with older mothers. Teen mothers are more likely than older mothers to be dependent on public assistance after giving birth and to experience turbulence in their family structures— even taking into account the fact that teen mothers tend to be from disadvantaged backgrounds. In addition, teen mothers are at a particularly high risk of dropping out of school, although previous research has found that they are more likely to be having problems in school prior to their pregnancy.

In light of teen mothers' heightened risk of becoming high school dropouts, Child Trends used recently released national survey data to explore high school diploma and GED attainment among women who had given birth as teens. Particularly, we looked at whether they had earned these educational credentials by the time that they reached their early twenties.

Our findings show that slightly more than one-half of young women who had been teen mothers received a high school diploma by the age of 22, compared with 89 percent of young women who had not given birth during their teen years. Furthermore, results of our analyses show that young women who had a child before the age of 18 were even less likely than were those who had a child when they were 18 or 19 to earn a high school diploma before the age of 22, although the rates of GED attainment in the former group were slightly higher. We also found differences in educational attainment among teen mothers by race/ethnicity.

Bibliography Citation
Perper, Kate, Kristen Peterson and Jennifer S. Manlove. "Diploma Attainment Among Teen Mothers." Child Trends Factsheet Publication #2010-01, Child Trends, Washington, DC, January 2010.
12. Sugland, Barbara W.
Perceptions of Educational Opportunity and Early Childbearing: An Empirical Assessment of the Opportunity Cost Hypothesis
Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, May 1996.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED416004.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Adolescent; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Fertility; First Birth; Racial Differences

ED416004
This study explored the relationship between perceived educational opportunities and the likelihood of first birth among young women. Data came from the first five waves (1979-1983) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. A cohort of 1,747 females, 14 to 16 years of age at the first interview, who had not experienced a birth prior to the first interview or within 7 months of first interview, and who had complete fertility histories at the 1983 panel, comprised the study sample. The discrepancy between young women's educational aspirations and expected educational achievements (expectations) was used to operationalize perceptions of opportunity and to predict the probability of a first birth among race/ethnicity subgroups of young women. Findings showed that all women expressed high educational ambitions, although non-whites perceived greater barriers to educational achievement than whites. Perceptions of opportunity, apart from background characteristics, were associated with the likelihood of a first birth among young white women, but had no substantial impact on the likelihood of a first birth among either young black or Hispanic women. White women who perceived barriers to educational attainment demonstrated twice the risk of first birth as whites who perceived few or no barriers to completing their desired education. These data suggest that perceptions of opportunity affect the risk of first birth for white women, but the data do not support the "nothing to lose" hypothesis of early childbearing applied to non-whites. [Author]
Bibliography Citation
Sugland, Barbara W. "Perceptions of Educational Opportunity and Early Childbearing: An Empirical Assessment of the Opportunity Cost Hypothesis." Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, May 1996.
13. Zill, Nicholas
Daly, Margaret
Researching the Family: A Guide to Survey and Statistical Data on U.S. Families
Report #93-28, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, 1993
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Family Studies; Longitudinal Data Sets; Overview, Child Assessment Data

Prepared for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Office of the Secretary, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Includes bibliographical references.
Bibliography Citation
Zill, Nicholas and Margaret Daly. "Researching the Family: A Guide to Survey and Statistical Data on U.S. Families." Report #93-28, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, 1993.
14. Zill, Nicholas
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Nord, Christine Winquis
Stief, Thomas
Welfare Mothers as Potential Employees: A Statistical Profile Based on National Survey Data
Report, Child Trends, Inc., 1991.
Also: http://openlibrary.org/b/OL1492369M/Welfare_mothers_as_potential_employees
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Government Regulation; Mothers; Poverty; Self-Esteem; Welfare

When women who receive welfare benefits are compared with other women, both poor and non-poor, in the NLSY and other national sample surveys, welfare mothers are notably different from non-poor mothers. At the same time, these data show that there is considerable diversity within the welfare population. In particular, compared to short-term recipients, longer-term recipients have lower cognitive achievement scores, less education, sporadic work experience, and lower self-esteem. Non-welfare mothers with similar disadvantages disproportionately find only low-paying service jobs, which are insufficient to move them out of poverty. Differences between poor women on welfare and poor working women are too small to represent major positive changes in the lives of the women themselves or in the life prospects of their children. The study suggests that federal programs of education and job training may be of help to those whose academic skills, education, and work experience are in the second quartile among welfare mothers. Those in the top quartile probably possess enough skills, education, and experience to succeed on their own, while prospects for those in the bottom half are unclear.
Bibliography Citation
Zill, Nicholas, Kristin Anderson Moore, Christine Winquis Nord and Thomas Stief. "Welfare Mothers as Potential Employees: A Statistical Profile Based on National Survey Data." Report, Child Trends, Inc., 1991.
15. Zill, Nicholas
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Smith, Ellen Wolpow
Stief, Thomas
Life Circumstances and Development of Children in Welfare Families: A Profile Based on National Survey Data
Research Report, Washington DC: Child Trends, October 29, 1991
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); General Assessment; Health Care; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Household Composition; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Welfare

The finding that welfare children exhibit problems such as low achievement, grade repetition, and classroom conduct disorders at rates double those shown by non-poor children means the "cycle of disadvantage" is still very much with us. Unless effective interventions are found and applied, many of these young people will go on to become adult non-workers and impoverished or dependent parents, perhaps producing another generation of high-risk children. The similarities between children in families receiving AFDC and other poor children suggest that low parent education, poverty, and family turmoil are detrimental to children's development, no matter what the particular sources of the family's financial support or the predominant family configuration might be. The findings may also mean that if families move from being "welfare poor" to "working poor," the overall life chances of the children will not necessarily be enhanced. The findings regarding the home environments of children suggest that many mothers in low-income families need more than remedial education or job training; some need training in effective childrearing practices. A lack of parental stimulation may not be the only handicap, or even the most significant impediment faced by children in AFDC families, but it is a handicap that can be addressed through programs such as parenting education, high quality child care, and compensatory preschool. Finally, there is the finding that welfare children are clearly doing better than children in other low-income families with respect to receipt of routine health care. This finding reinforces concerns about the possible negative effects on children of a loss of Medicaid benefits as parents move from AFDC dependency to precarious self-sufficiency.
Bibliography Citation
Zill, Nicholas, Kristin Anderson Moore, Ellen Wolpow Smith and Thomas Stief. "Life Circumstances and Development of Children in Welfare Families: A Profile Based on National Survey Data." Research Report, Washington DC: Child Trends, October 29, 1991.
16. Zill, Nicholas
Peterson, James Lloyd
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Guide to Federal Data on Children, Youth, and Families
Report #89-04, Conference on Child and Family Statistics, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, 1988
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Children; Data Quality/Consistency; Family Studies; Longitudinal Data Sets; Overview, Child Assessment Data

Overview of research and policy uses of federal data on children and families: Recommendations from the Second Interagency.
Bibliography Citation
Zill, Nicholas, James Lloyd Peterson and Kristin Anderson Moore. "Guide to Federal Data on Children, Youth, and Families." Report #89-04, Conference on Child and Family Statistics, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, 1988.