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Source: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Aubry, Jean-Pierre
Munnell, Alicia H.
Quinby, Laura D.
Springstead, Glenn
How Many Public Workers Without Social Security Could Fall Short?
State and Local Pension Plans Brief 82, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, April 2022.
Also: https://crr.bc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/SLP82.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College
Keyword(s): Health and Retirement Study (HRS); Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Pensions; Public Sector; Retirement/Retirement Planning; Social Security

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Social Security is designed to serve as the base of retirement support, to be supplemented by employer sponsored plans. However, some state and local government employees -- approximately one-quarter, or 5 million workers annually -- are not covered by Social Security on their current job. Federal law allows these noncovered workers to remain outside of Social Security if their state or local plan provides comparable benefits. This brief addresses the extent to which lifetime benefits received by noncovered workers are equal to what they would have received from Social Security alone, had they been covered. Hence, the brief compares the pensions of noncovered workers to a very low bar, leaving to later discussion the broader question of how their total retirement income compares to workers with a lifetime of Social Security and employer-provided benefits.
Bibliography Citation
Aubry, Jean-Pierre, Alicia H. Munnell, Laura D. Quinby and Glenn Springstead. "How Many Public Workers Without Social Security Could Fall Short?" State and Local Pension Plans Brief 82, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, April 2022.
2. Chen, Anqi
Gok, Nilufer
Will Women Catch Up to their Fertility Expectations?
CRR WP 2021-4, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, February 2021.
Also: http://hdl.handle.net/2345/bc-ir:109061
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Expectations/Intentions; Family Size; Fertility

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In 2019, the Total Fertility Rate (TFR) dipped to 1.71 children per woman, an all-time low and far below the replacement rate of 2.10 children. Current levels of low fertility have important implications for the economy. To assess fertility trends, demographers often look at fertility expectations. Using this metric suggests no cause for concern. Women in their early 30s today, when first asked about their childbearing expectations in their early 20s, expected to have more than two children, similar to previous cohorts. But today's 30-year-olds are much further from their 20-24 expectations than previous cohorts. And a number of trends have emerged in recent years that could suggest lower fertility. This project aims to shed light on whether women are likely to catch up to their fertility expectations and what factors influence their ability to do so. The analysis uses a regression framework to examine factors that drive fertility after age 30 for an older cohort of women surveyed in the NLSY79. The results are then used to predict the completed fertility for the younger cohort of women surveyed in the NLSY97, who are in their early- to mid-30s and still in their childbearing years.
Bibliography Citation
Chen, Anqi and Nilufer Gok. "Will Women Catch Up to their Fertility Expectations?" CRR WP 2021-4, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, February 2021.
3. Luca, Dara Lee
Sevak, Purvi
Scheduling Uncertainty and Employment of Young Adults with Disabilities
CRR WP 2020-5, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, January 2020.
Also: http://hdl.handle.net/2345/bc-ir:108866
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Disabled Workers; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the prevalence of scheduling uncertainty and the degree of work hour volatility among young adults with disabilities from 2008 through 2018, using data from the Current Population Survey and the National Longitudinal Youth Survey. First, the paper documents the magnitude of several features of irregular schedules among workers with disabilities in recent years. Second, it examines differences in irregular schedules between workers with and without disabilities. Third, it describes the trends in these features over the past decade. A key limitation of the study is that it cannot directly measure whether workers are employed in gig jobs.
Bibliography Citation
Luca, Dara Lee and Purvi Sevak. "Scheduling Uncertainty and Employment of Young Adults with Disabilities." CRR WP 2020-5, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, January 2020.
4. Rutledge, Matthew S.
Sanzenbacher, Geoffrey
Vitagliano, Francis M.
Do Young Adults with Student Debt Save Less for Retirement?
Issue in Brief 18-13, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, June 2018.
Also: https://dlib.bc.edu/islandora/object/bc-ir:108128
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Debt/Borrowing; Retirement/Retirement Planning; Savings; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The brief's key findings are: (1) Student debt nearly tripled in real terms from 2005 to 2017, creating a financial burden that could potentially hamper retirement saving by young adults. (2) The analysis looked at the impact of student debt on 401(k) participation and assets for young workers who attended college, both graduates and non-graduates. (3) The results showed that student debt does not significantly affect 401(k) participation rates for either group. (4) However, student debt does seem to affect how much college graduates save: those with debt have only about half as much in assets by age 30 as those without debt.
Bibliography Citation
Rutledge, Matthew S., Geoffrey Sanzenbacher and Francis M. Vitagliano. "Do Young Adults with Student Debt Save Less for Retirement?" Issue in Brief 18-13, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, June 2018.