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Source: Catholic University of America
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Cook, Michelle R.
Mental Illness, Self-Concept, and Interpersonal Relationships as Predictors of Recidivism: Exploring Correctional Adaptation
Ph.D. Dissertation, The Catholic University of America, 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Catholic University of America Press
Keyword(s): Arrests; Criminal Justice System; Health, Mental; Relationship Conflict

This study analyzed the relationship between mental illness, self-concept, and interpersonal relationships to explain variance in recidivism. The primary hypothesis was that those with mental illness, an inadequate self-concept, and poor interpersonal relationships would be more likely to have higher levels of recidivism. The secondary hypothesis examined differences using these same variables on recidivism by type of offender. This study contributes to the knowledge of social work and criminal justice research by further establishing that there may be a correlation between individual psychological dynamics and recidivism. This research is a secondary analysis of data using the National Longitudinal Youth Survey beginning in 1997 (NLSY97), which consists of a sample of approximately 9,000 youths who were 12 to 16 years old as of December 31, 1996. The sample population for this analysis includes 2,883 participants. An individual had to have a least one arrest to be included in this study. Findings partially support both hypotheses and give merit for the need for further research in this area. The findings show a paradoxical relationship between mental health scores; this indicates that while the results may not have been as predicted, it reveals that mental illness is related to recidivism. The findings support the pivotal role that interpersonal relationships play in recidivism. This study revealed that one aspect of self-concept, negative perceptions of the future in 2000, was a predictor of recidivism. There was a difference among the different groups, as classified by according to their crime/arrest history, indicating that the impact of these variables was varied among the groups.
Bibliography Citation
Cook, Michelle R. Mental Illness, Self-Concept, and Interpersonal Relationships as Predictors of Recidivism: Exploring Correctional Adaptation. Ph.D. Dissertation, The Catholic University of America, 2014.
2. Lerman, Robert I.
A National Profile of Young Unwed Fathers: Who Are They and How Are They Parenting?
Presented: Washington, DC, Catholic University, Conference on Unwed Fathers, October 1986
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Catholic University of America Press
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Children; Educational Attainment; Fathers; Fathers, Absence; High School Dropouts; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Sexual Experiences/Virginity; Substance Use; Work Attachment

Using data from the 1979-1985 NLSY, this report profiles the characteristics of young men who are unwed fathers. Young unwed fathers were found to be generally less educated with lower academic abilities, to have engaged in sexual intercourse at an earlier age, and to be more involved in criminal activities than other young men. Family background factors such as low family income and having lived in a welfare household increased the probability that a young man would become an unwed father. Significant race differences in unwed fatherhood remained even after taking account of family background and other personal differences.
Bibliography Citation
Lerman, Robert I. "A National Profile of Young Unwed Fathers: Who Are They and How Are They Parenting?" Presented: Washington, DC, Catholic University, Conference on Unwed Fathers, October 1986.
3. Lerman, Robert I.
A National Profile of Young Unwed Fathers: Who Are They and How Are They Parenting?
In: Young Unwed Fathers: Research Review, Policy Dilemmas, and Options, Volume II. J Smollar and T Ooms, eds. Washington, DC: Catholic University, 1987
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Commerce
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Children; Educational Attainment; Fathers; Fathers, Absence; High School Dropouts; Hispanic Youth; Hispanics; Marital Status; Racial Differences; Substance Use; Work Attachment

Lerman's research on young unwed fathers provides some evidence that white mothers may exit the never-married (i.e., marry out of the population) at a faster rate than black mothers. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, he found that unlike blacks, the majority of white and Hispanic young unwed fathers in 1979 had married the mother of their children and were living with all of their children by 1984.
Bibliography Citation
Lerman, Robert I. "A National Profile of Young Unwed Fathers: Who Are They and How Are They Parenting?" In: Young Unwed Fathers: Research Review, Policy Dilemmas, and Options, Volume II. J Smollar and T Ooms, eds. Washington, DC: Catholic University, 1987