Search Results

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
Resulting in 39 citations.
1. Altonji, Joseph G.
Bharadwaj, Prashant
Lange, Fabian
Changes in the Characteristics of American Youth: Implications for Adult Outcomes
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/altonji.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Education; Ethnic Groups; Ethnic Studies; Gender; Labor Market Outcomes; Racial Studies; Skills; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Transition, School to Work

We examine changes in the characteristics of American youth between the late 1970s and the late 1990s, with a focus on characteristics that matter for labor market success. We reweight the NLSY79 to look like the NLSY97 along a number of dimensions that are related to labor market success, including race, gender, parental background, education, test scores, and variables that capture whether individuals transition smoothly from school to work. We then use the re-weighted sample to examine how changes in the distribution of observable skills affect employment and wages. We also use more standard regression methods to assess the labor market consequences of differences between the two cohorts. Overall, we find that the current generation is more skilled than the previous one. Blacks and Hispanics have gained relative to whites and women have gained relative to men. However, skill differences within groups have increased considerably and in aggregate the skill distribution has widened. Changes in parental education seem to generate many of the observed changes
Bibliography Citation
Altonji, Joseph G., Prashant Bharadwaj and Fabian Lange. "Changes in the Characteristics of American Youth: Implications for Adult Outcomes." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
2. Altonji, Joseph G.
Cattan, Peter
Ware, Iain
Identifying Sibling Influences on Teenage Risky Behavior
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Behavior; Risk-Taking; Siblings

Bibliography Citation
Altonji, Joseph G., Peter Cattan and Iain Ware. "Identifying Sibling Influences on Teenage Risky Behavior." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
3. Antos, Joseph R.
Mellow, Wesley
Youth Labor Market: A Dynamic Overview
BLS Staff Paper No 11. Washington, DC: US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Department of Labor, 1979
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Earnings; Employment; Job Turnover; Mobility, Job; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Unemployment; Unions

"This report was prepared under contract 20-11-76-47 with the Employment and Training Administration, U.S. Department of Labor."

This study uses six years of data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of young males and females to investigate how young people adapt to the market place. A five component recursive model is sequentially estimated for each age from l8 through 27. The components are: education and labor force status, wage determination, turnover, unemployment duration, and wage growth. Evidence is found that competitive forces operate over the long run in the youth labor market. Productive capabilities are rewarded, and workers initially earning less (more) than their potential move up (down) the wage distribution. Job changing facilitates this equilibration, although turnover among females appears to be less purposeful than for males. We also find that deteriorating aggregate economic conditions severely disrupt the youth labor market, increasing unemployment and depressing wage growth.

Bibliography Citation
Antos, Joseph R. and Wesley Mellow. Youth Labor Market: A Dynamic Overview. BLS Staff Paper No 11. Washington, DC: US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Department of Labor, 1979.
4. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Gardecki, Rosella M.
Attrition in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://www.fcsm.gov/07papers/Aughinbaugh.V-C.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Attrition; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Gender Differences; Nonresponse; Research Methodology; Sample Selection; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

This paper measures the level, the patterns, and the implications of attrition in the NLSY97. Much of the survey methodology literature considers participation in surveys as a multi-step process, where step 1 is establishing contact and step 2 involves gaining cooperation (Watson and Woods 2006). Because few NLSY97 sample members are unlocatable, however, we study attrition as a simple one-step process.

The first section of this paper describes the patterns of wave non-response, first attrition, and return in the NLSY97. The second section estimates (1) the probability of first attrition, and (2) among attritors, the probability of return in a subsequent round as functions of employment, schooling, and demographic events at the most recent interview thus we can assess whether certain groups of individuals (e.g. the unemployed, students, the married) are more likely to leave and return to the NLSY97. In the third section, we estimate quantile regressions in an attempt to examine whether attritors and returnees differ from those who remain in the survey with respect to the distribution of wage rates and total earnings. Lastly, we conclude by summarizing what the estimates presented here tell us about the nature and implications of attrition in the NLSY97.

Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen and Rosella M. Gardecki. "Attrition in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
5. Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen
Gittleman, Maury
Maternal Employment and Adolescent Risky Behavior
Working Paper No. 366, Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 2003.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/ore/pdf/ec030030.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Use; Child Health; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Crime; Drug Use; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Sexual Activity; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use

This paper examines the impact of maternal employment during a child?s first three years and during adolescence on his or her decisions to engage in a range of risky behaviors: smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, using marijuana and other drugs, engaging in sex and committing crimes. Using data from the NLSY79 and its young adult supplement, we find little evidence that mother?s employment early in the child?s life has lasting consequences on participation in risky behaviors. Similarly, with the possible exception of drinking alcohol?our results do not indicate that maternal employment during adolescence is correlated with increased involvement in risky activities. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, Atlanta, GA, May 9-11, 2002 and the Annual Congress of the European Society of Population Economics, Bilbao, Spain, June 13-15, 2002.
Bibliography Citation
Aughinbaugh, Alison Aileen and Maury Gittleman. "Maternal Employment and Adolescent Risky Behavior." Working Paper No. 366, Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 2003.
6. Bellair, Paul E.
McNulty, Thomas L.
Neighborhood Disadvantage, Gang Membership, Drug Dealing and Violence
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/Bellair_Neighborhood_Disadvantage.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Behavior, Violent; Census of Population; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Disadvantaged, Economically; Geocoded Data; Neighborhood Effects; Socioeconomic Background

A prominent perspective in the gang literature suggests that gang member involvement in drug selling does not necessarily increase violent behavior. In addition it is unclear from previous research whether neighborhood disadvantage strengthens that relationship. We address those issues by testing hypotheses regarding the confluence of gang membership, drug selling, and violent behavior in socio-economically disadvantaged neighborhoods. A three-level hierarchical model is estimated from the first five waves of the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, matched with block-group characteristics from the 2000 U.S. Census. Results indicate that (1) gang members who sell drugs are significantly more violent than gang members that don't sell drugs and drug sellers that don't belong to gangs; (2) drug sellers that don't belong to gangs and gang members who don't sell drugs engage in comparable levels of violence; and (3) neighborhood disadvantage intensifies the effect of gang membership on violence, especially among gang members that sell drugs.
Bibliography Citation
Bellair, Paul E. and Thomas L. McNulty. "Neighborhood Disadvantage, Gang Membership, Drug Dealing and Violence." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
7. Black, Dan A.
Charles, Kerwin
Sanders, Seth G.
Problem with Men, The
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Gender; Gender Differences

Bibliography Citation
Black, Dan A., Kerwin Charles and Seth G. Sanders. "Problem with Men, The." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
8. Black, Dan A.
Xia, Kanru
Michael, Robert T.
Propensity to Agree to be an NLSY97 Respondent: Evidence from the Screener Data
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/BMichael_Propensity_ToBe_NLSY97_Respondent.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Research Methodology

This paper uses information from the NLSY97 screener data to model which of the eligible youths did in fact agree to become respondents in the first round of the survey. Reflecting the high quality of the NORC field effort, 92 percent of the eligible youths become NLSY97 respondents. The initial household screener contains information about the youth, the family, and the neighborhood; this information is used to model the propensity to participate in the survey for all eligible youths. For those who did participate – the respondents in the NLSY97 – the paper offers a variable that can be used to correct for selection bias into the survey. That predicted propensity is then compared to the subsequent behavior by the youth regarding completion of later rounds of the survey.
Bibliography Citation
Black, Dan A., Kanru Xia and Robert T. Michael. "Propensity to Agree to be an NLSY97 Respondent: Evidence from the Screener Data." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
9. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Labor Market Experiences and More: Studying Men, Women, and Children Since 1966, National Longitudinal Surveys
GPO Item No: 0769. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, April 2000
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Labor Market Surveys; Longitudinal Surveys

Government Document, Sudoc Number: GovDoc: L 2.2:EX 7/2000; GPO Item No: 0769.

SUBJECTS: 1. National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience (U.S.) 2. Labor market--United States -Longitudinal studies.

Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Labor Market Experiences and More: Studying Men, Women, and Children Since 1966, National Longitudinal Surveys. GPO Item No: 0769. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, April 2000.
10. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Work and Family: Jobs Held and Weeks Worked by Young Adults
Report 827, Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Burea of Labor Statistics, August 1992.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/nls/nlswk005.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Employment; Gender Differences; Labor Force Participation; Racial Differences; Work Histories

This issue of Work and Family examines the employment histories of young persons. It draws upon data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth which provides a nearly complete work history on all jobs held and weeks worked over a 12-year period, 1978 to 1990. By age 29, a typical young worker has held 7.6 jobs and worked 434 weeks since age 18, an average of 36.2 weeks per year. There are significant differences in the number of jobs held and weeks worked by sex and race.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Work and Family: Jobs Held and Weeks Worked by Young Adults. Report 827, Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Burea of Labor Statistics, August 1992..
11. Carrington, William J.
Fallick, Bruce C.
Minimum Wage Careers
NTIS Report PB2000107225, Federal Reserve System, Washington DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Aug. 1999
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Disadvantaged, Economically; Employment; Income Level; Legislation; Minimum Wage

This paper investigates the extent to which people spend careers on minimum wage jobs. We find that a small but non-trivial number of National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY) spend 25%, 50% or even 75% of the first ten years of their career on minimum or near-minimum wage jobs. Workers with these minimum wage careers tend to be drawn from groups such as women, blacks, and the less-educated that are generally overrepresented in the low-wage population. The results indicate that lifetime incomes of some workers may be supported by a minimum wage. At the same time, these same groups would be disproportionately affected by any minimum wage-induced disemployment. The results suggest that minimum wage legislation has non-negligible effects on the lifetime opportunities of a significant minority of workers.
Bibliography Citation
Carrington, William J. and Bruce C. Fallick. "Minimum Wage Careers." NTIS Report PB2000107225, Federal Reserve System, Washington DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Aug. 1999.
12. Datta, Atreyee Rupa
Krishnamurty, Parvati
High School Experience: Comparing Self-Report and Transcript Data from the NLSY97
Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/DattaKrishnamurty_NLSY97Transcript_052408.doc
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Education, Secondary; High School Students; High School Transcripts; Interviewing Method; Self-Reporting

The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort (NLSY97) dataset include two sources of information about respondents' high school experiences: self-reports from annual interviews with individuals throughout their high school years, and abstracted information from their high school transcripts. Although the transcripts and interview data were designed to complement one another, their co-existence offers the opportunity to compare interview and transcript data as alternative sources for some key pieces of data about educational experience. In this paper, we describe the two types of data collected from these sources and assess the concordance of some measures. We conclude with some comments about the relative merits and weaknesses of each type of data for measuring different aspects of high school experience.
Bibliography Citation
Datta, Atreyee Rupa and Parvati Krishnamurty. "High School Experience: Comparing Self-Report and Transcript Data from the NLSY97." Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
13. Engelhardt, Gary V.
Income and Wealth in the NLSY79
Presented: Washington DC, NLSY79 Redesign Conference, September 1998
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Income; Variables, Instrumental; Wealth

This reports evaluates the NLSY79 survey instrument's questions on income and wealth.
Bibliography Citation
Engelhardt, Gary V. "Income and Wealth in the NLSY79." Presented: Washington DC, NLSY79 Redesign Conference, September 1998.
14. Finlay, Keith
Effect of Employer Access to Criminal History Data on the Labor Market Outcomes of Ex-Offenders and Non-Offenders
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/finlay.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Crime; Discrimination, Employer; Employment; Human Capital; Incarceration/Jail; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Outcomes

This paper exploits this previously unexamined variation to identify the effect of expanded employer access to criminal history data on the labor market outcomes of ex-offenders and non-offenders. Employers express a strong aversion to hiring ex-offenders, but there is likely asymmetric information about criminal records. Wider availability of criminal history records should adversely affect the labor market outcomes of ex-offenders. A model of statistical discrimination also predicts that non-offenders from groups with high rates of criminal offense should have improved labor market outcomes when criminal history records become more accessible. This paper tests these hypotheses with criminal and labor market histories from the 1997 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. I find evidence that labor market outcomes are worse for ex-offenders once state criminal history records become available over the Internet, and somewhat weaker evidence that outcomes are better for nonoffenders from highly offending groups. Results for ex-offenders demonstrate the presence of imperfect information about criminal records by employers. The non-offender results are consistent with statistical discrimination by employers. Estimates may be confounded by a short sample period and ongoing human capital investments, but the research design provides a unique setting for testing theories of statistical discrimination.
Bibliography Citation
Finlay, Keith. "Effect of Employer Access to Criminal History Data on the Labor Market Outcomes of Ex-Offenders and Non-Offenders." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
15. Frazis, Harley Jay
Loewenstein, Mark A.
NTIS Reexamining the Returns to Training: Functional Form, Magnitude, and Interpretation
Report: BLS Working Paper No. 367. Washington DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, 2003.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/osmr/abstract/ec/ec030040.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Labor Market Outcomes; Training; Training, Occupational

This paper estimates the wage returns to training, paying careful attention to the choice of functional form. Both the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and Employer Opportunity Pilot Project (EOPP) datasets indicate that the return to an extra hour of formal training diminishes sharply with the amount of training received. A cube root specification fits the data best, but the log specification also does well. The linear and quadratic specifications substantially understate the effect of training.

Also: NTIS Report: PB2006101302

Bibliography Citation
Frazis, Harley Jay and Mark A. Loewenstein. "NTIS Reexamining the Returns to Training: Functional Form, Magnitude, and Interpretation." Report: BLS Working Paper No. 367. Washington DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, 2003.
16. Gittleman, Maury
Medicaid and Wealth: An Examination Using the NLSY79
Working Paper No. 448, Bureau of Labor Statistics, August 2011.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/osmr/abstract/ec/ec110060.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Insurance, Health; Medicaid/Medicare; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Savings; Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP); Wealth

Do public insurance programs crowd out private savings? I examine the relationship between Medicaid and wealth and make a contribution to the literature on this issue in three primary ways. First, I apply the instrumental-variables approach developed by Gruber and Yelowitz (1999) to a different dataset, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 (NLSY79), while at the same time examining an alternative instrument. The results turn out to differ depending on the instrument and, for one of the instruments, to be sensitive to assumptions needed to identify Medicaid’s effects. Second, using the longitudinal data in the NLSY79, I am able to observe families before and after becoming eligible for Medicaid, and use fixed-effects to control for family-specific unobservable factors that are correlated with both Medicaid eligibility and wealth accumulation. It turns out, however, that assessment of the impact of Medicaid by means of fixed effects has its limitations as well. Third, I make use of the SIPP data used by Gruber and Yelowitz themselves, and examine the sensitivity of their conclusions to omitted factors that may be related to both Medicaid eligibility and to wealth accumulation. While more robust than the results using the NLSY79, the SIPP estimates are found to depend on the sample used and on certain specification restrictions. Taken together, the results suggest caution in making inferences about the impact of Medicaid on wealth.
Bibliography Citation
Gittleman, Maury. "Medicaid and Wealth: An Examination Using the NLSY79." Working Paper No. 448, Bureau of Labor Statistics, August 2011.
17. Grogger, Jeffrey
Speech Patterns and Racial Wage Differences
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Racial Differences; Wage Gap

Black-white wage gap is persistent. Are there persistent differences between blacks and whites that could help explain that gap?
Bibliography Citation
Grogger, Jeffrey. "Speech Patterns and Racial Wage Differences." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
18. Herman, Alexis M.
Report on the Youth Labor Force
Report, Office of Publications and Special Studies, U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington DC, 2000.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/opub/rylf/rylfhome.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Child Labor; Demography; Labor Force Participation; Rural/Urban Differences

Table of Contents; Chapter 1. Introduction; Chapter 2. Child Labor Laws and Enforcement; Chapter 3. A Detailed Look at Employment of Youths Aged 12 to 15; Chapter 4. Trends in Youth Employment: Data from the Current Population Survey; Chapter 5. Youth Employment in Agriculture; Chapter 6. Occupational Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities; Chapter 7. The Relationship of Youth Employment to Future Educational Attainment and Labor Market Experience. This report has three main purposes. First, it explains the current U.S. regulations governing child labor. Second, it provides a detailed look at youth labor in this country, including how it differs among major demographic groups, between the agricultural and nonagricultural sectors, and over time. Third, it describes the out-comes of young people's work activities, including occupational injuries and fatalities and other, longer-term consequences. Much government information is published regularly for the standard classification of 16- to 19-year-olds. This report contributes to knowledge by presenting information not normally provided for youths under 18 years of age.
Bibliography Citation
Herman, Alexis M. "Report on the Youth Labor Force." Report, Office of Publications and Special Studies, U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington DC, 2000.
19. Hill, Carolyn J.
Holzer, Harry J.
Chen, Henry
Against the Tide: Household Structure, Opportunities, and Outcomes among White and Minority Youth
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/kaestner.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Family Income; Home Environment; Household Structure; Human Capital; Neighborhood Effects; Racial Differences; Statistical Analysis

Excerpts
In this chapter [3]we examine household structure and its statistical relationship with observed outcomes among youth. Using information from the NLSY97, we show the range of household structures youth lived in when they were twelve years old, and how these differ by race. We show how household structure is correlated with other important characteristics of families and households, such as family income and parental education. Next, the chapter presents estimates of the statistical associations between household structure and the outcomes that were introduced in Chapter 2 in areas of employment, education, and risky behaviors. These are based on regression equations that control for many characteristics of the young people and their mothers, including some that have been "unobserved" in previous work.

In this chapter [4], we further explore three types of household characteristics that are likely to be correlated both with household structure and with the employment, educational, and behavioral outcomes we examine. They are measures of: (1) human capital enrichment; (2) parenting and home environment; and (3) neighborhood characteristics.

Using information from a subset of the NLSY97, we first show how measures in each of the three categories are associated with household structure. Next, we present 29 regression models similar to those shown in Chapter 3, now adding these three types of household characteristics. We show how the estimated effects of household structure differ once these characteristics are included in the models. We also show the joint influence of each of these three categories of variables on the outcomes.

Bibliography Citation
Hill, Carolyn J., Harry J. Holzer and Henry Chen. "Against the Tide: Household Structure, Opportunities, and Outcomes among White and Minority Youth." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
20. Hill, M. Anne
O'Neill, June E.
A Study of Intercohort Change in Women's Work patterns and Earning
NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-10, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington DC, December 1990.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/ore/abstract/nl/nl900040.htm
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Divorce; Labor Force Participation; Life Cycle Research; Marriage; Schooling; Skills; Wage Differentials; Wage Gap; Wages, Men; Wages, Women; Work Experience; Work Reentry

After remaining virtually constant during the poet-World War II period, the ratio of women's earnings to men'a increased sharply during the 1980'a, rising from 59.7 percent in 1979 to 68.5 percent in 1989. The failure of the overall wage gap to narrow during the 1950-1980 period has been something of a puzzle. This research utilizes data from the three continuing panels of the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) -- the mature women, the young women' and the youth cohort -- to measure accumulated years of work experience and to examine changes in life-cycle work patterns across successive cohorts of women born between 1923 and 1964. This study has investigated how these successive cohorts of women have changed with respect to their accumulation of work-related skills, in terms of level of schooling, career orientation, and attachment to the labor force. We consider how the nature of entry into and exit from the labor force changed across cohorts and how the response of women's labor force participation decisions to life-cycle events (e.g., marriage, the birth of a child, divorce) may have changed. Intercohort changes in women' a returns to work experience, schooling, and other human capital investments are also considered. This research has yielded important insights into the nature and determinants of the work patterns and earnings of American women.
Bibliography Citation
Hill, M. Anne and June E. O'Neill. "A Study of Intercohort Change in Women's Work patterns and Earning." NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-10, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington DC, December 1990.
21. Kaestner, Robert
Grossman, Michael
Effects of Weight on Adolescent Educational Attainment
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/kaestner.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Modeling; Obesity; Weight

In this paper, we investigate the association between weight and adolescent's educational attainment, as measured by highest grade attended, highest grade completed, and drop out status. Data for the study came from the 1997 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), which contains a large, national sample of teens between the ages of 14 and 18. We obtained estimates of the association between weight and educational attainment using several regression model specifications that controlled for a variety of observed characteristics. Our results suggest that, in general, teens that are overweight or obese have levels of attainment that are about the same as teens with average weight.
Bibliography Citation
Kaestner, Robert and Michael Grossman. "Effects of Weight on Adolescent Educational Attainment." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
22. Kalenkoski, Charlene Marie
Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff
Parental Transfers, Student Achievement, and the Labor Supply of College Students
BLS Working Papers No. 374, Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington DC, July 2004
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Academic Development; Achievement; College Education; Family Income; Part-Time Work; Schooling, Post-secondary; Transfers, Parental

College students may participate in market work to finance their college educations. Using data from the NLSY97, three hypotheses are tested. First, smaller parental transfers lead to more hours worked while in school. Second, an increase in the net price of schooling leads to an increase in hours worked. Finally, an increase in hours worked leads to a decrease in a student' GPA. The results indicate that the number of hours a student works per week is unaffected by the schooling-related financial variables and that the number of hours worked per week does not affect a student' GPA. (Abstract by the author.)

Revised several times: See for final http://www.bls.gov/ore/pdf/ec060130.pdf

Bibliography Citation
Kalenkoski, Charlene Marie and Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia. "Parental Transfers, Student Achievement, and the Labor Supply of College Students." BLS Working Papers No. 374, Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington DC, July 2004.
23. Leibowitz, Arleen A.
Klerman, Jacob Alex
Waite, Linda J.
Women's Employment During Pregnancy and Following Birth
Report No. NLS 92-11, Washington DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 1992.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/ore/abstract/nl/nl920010.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Employment; First Birth; Labor Force Participation; Maternal Employment; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Women; Work Histories

During the last three decades, the "working mother" has become the norm rather than a rarity. In 1960, fewer than one in five mothers with children under age six (18.6 percent) were in the labor force. By 1987, this percentage had tripled, reaching 57 percent. Current participation levels for mothers of younger children are even more striking. Fifty-three percent of married mothers with children 1 year old or under are in the labor force Previous research has consistently found that women with young children are less likely to participate in the labor force than those with only older children. Today labor force activity reaches high levels soon after the birth of a child, and many women interrupt work for only short periods of time. Although half the new mothers have returned to work within a year after giving birth, the factors that affect the timing within that year are not well understood. Similarly, the factors that influence how long women work during their pregnanc ies have not been fully explored. The analysis of women's increased work effort during pregnancy and rapid return to work after childbirth call for a research strategy using data that can distinguish among work patterns by month of return to work rather than by year. This paper uses panel data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth (NLS-Y) to examine whether perinatal labor supply is positively related to women's real wages. We also expect to find a negative relation between mothers' work efforts and other household income.
Bibliography Citation
Leibowitz, Arleen A., Jacob Alex Klerman and Linda J. Waite. "Women's Employment During Pregnancy and Following Birth." Report No. NLS 92-11, Washington DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 1992.
24. Lempert, David A.
Women's Increasing Wage Penalties from Being Overweight and Obese
BLS Economic Working Paper No. 414. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, December 2007
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Obesity; Racial Differences; Wage Differentials; Wages, Women; Weight

This paper first utilizes annual surveys between the 1981 and 2000 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to estimate the effect of being overweight on hourly wages. Previous studies have shown that white women are the only race-gender group for which weight has a statistically significant effect on wages. This paper finds a statistically significant continual increase in the wage penalty for overweight and obese white women followed throughout two decades. A supporting analysis from a cross-sectional dataset, comprised of the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey and the 2000 and 2004 waves of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, also shows an increasing wage penalty. The bias against weight has increased, despite drastic increases in the rate of obesity in the United States. Alternatively, the increasing rarity of thinness has led to its rising premium.
Bibliography Citation
Lempert, David A. "Women's Increasing Wage Penalties from Being Overweight and Obese." BLS Economic Working Paper No. 414. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, December 2007.
25. Lochner, Lance John
Belley, Philippe
Frenette, Marc
Family Income, Ability and Post-Secondary Attendance in the US and Canada
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Canada, Canadian; Family Income; Schooling, Post-secondary

Bibliography Citation
Lochner, Lance John, Philippe Belley and Marc Frenette. "Family Income, Ability and Post-Secondary Attendance in the US and Canada." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
26. Manlove, Jennifer S.
Scott, Mindy E.
Ikramullah, Erum N.
Perper, Kate
Lilja, Emily
Relationship Context and the Transition to a Nonmarital Birth
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/Manlove_et_al_NonMarital_Birth.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Cohabitation; Contraception; Fertility; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Sexual Activity

The key hypothesis for this paper is that decision-making about nonmarital childbearing and its proximate determinants (including sexual activity, contraceptive use and pregnancy) is often made within the context of relationships. In fact, some researchers state that nonmarital childbearing, including childbearing within cohabiting relationships, is best studied with information about both partners (Seltzer, 2000). However, the majority of research on nonmarital childbearing focuses on family, individual, community, and social policy factors associated with the transition to a nonmarital birth. … This study expands previous research by using nationally representative longitudinal data to examine the association between relationship and partner characteristics, as well as individuals' sexual, marital and fertility histories, and the transition to a nonmarital birth for males and females.
Bibliography Citation
Manlove, Jennifer S., Mindy E. Scott, Erum N. Ikramullah, Kate Perper and Emily Lilja. "Relationship Context and the Transition to a Nonmarital Birth." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
27. Manser, Marilyn E.
Existing Labor Market Data: Current and Potential Research Uses
Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 1995
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Employment; Labor Economics; Unemployment

Major new research questions and policy issues concerning labor markets have arisen in recent years. An overriding set of issues involves the perception that many jobs have become less secure and newly-created jobs may not be "good jobs" on a number of dimensions. Analysis of these issues requires understanding of contingent work and other non-traditional work arrangements, the pattern of individual job changes and career growth, the process of job destruction and creation, the structure of compensation, and what happens within firms. At the same time that there appear to be major changes in the labor market, there has been little change in the concepts used, the types of information collected, the surveys employed, or the way in which the data are processed and made available. The purpose of this paper is to set the stage for addressing the current needs for labor market information. The first part provides background for the conference by describing existing government data on employment, unemployment, and compensation and the major purposes of these data and by analyzing their uses in recent labor economics research. The second part of the paper is interpretive and more forward looking: it examines other possible uses of the data and problems in responding to changing needs for data.
Bibliography Citation
Manser, Marilyn E. "Existing Labor Market Data: Current and Potential Research Uses." Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 1995.
28. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Mbwana, Kassim
Preventing Risky Sex
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/Moore_Mbwana_Preventing_Risky_Sex.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Gender; Parenting Skills/Styles; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

Our goal is to extend prior research exploring differences on the effects of parenting and varied risk factors on adolescent sexual behavior for both males and females. We examine four outcomes: sexual activity, unsafe sex, multiple sexual partners and teen parenthood. We test three hypotheses. First, we hypothesize that higher levels of parental awareness and authoritative parenting will be associated, as a main effect, with reduced sexual activity, more consistent contraceptive use, fewer sexual partners, and a lower probability of teen parenthood. Second, we assess the main effects for a varied set of adolescent risks including behavioral problems, peer risks, neighborhood risks and academic risk, by gender. These risks are identified based on an ecological model for exploring a comprehensive set of background risk factors that may influence an adolescent's outcomes. We hypothesize that higher levels of adolescent risks will be associated with increased sexual activity, reduced contraceptive use, an increased number of sexual partners, and higher risks of teen parenthood. Third, we extend previous work by examining how parenting practices interact with early adolescent risks to affect sexual behavior and early parenthood later in the adolescent years. We hypothesize that stronger parenting will be especially protective for preventing risky sexual behaviors among high-risk adolescents. Specifically, we hypothesize that adolescents with greater school, neighborhood, peers, and individual risks will benefit more from parental monitoring/awareness and authoritative parenting than adolescents at lesser risk. These hypotheses are explored separately by gender.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson and Kassim Mbwana. "Preventing Risky Sex." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
29. Mott, Frank L.
The NLS Mature Women's Cohort: A Socioeconomic Overview
Presented: Washington, DC, Secretary of Labor's Invitational Conference on the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, January 26, 1978.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED155344.pdf
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Earnings; Employment; Fertility; Schooling; Work Attitudes

Data collected from 1967 to 1972 during the National Longitudinal Surveys was used to examine the labor force behavior of the mature women's cohort (women who were thirty to forty-four years old in 1967) as well as their attitudes toward work and home. The findings include the following: while white women increased their labor force participation levels, black women decreased theirs; since black labor force participation rates were higher than white levels in 1967, the net result was a convergence in rates between the races over the five-year period, particularly for women who were separated or divorced; black employed women greatly improved their earnings between 1966 and 1971; black women showed overall shifts toward more positive work attitudes but not to the extent that white women did; and whereas the work attitudes of white working women were much more positive than the attitudes of their nonworking counterparts, black women not at work felt as strongly as black women at work that work was necessary. (This paper includes fifteen tables of data.) (EM)
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. "The NLS Mature Women's Cohort: A Socioeconomic Overview." Presented: Washington, DC, Secretary of Labor's Invitational Conference on the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, January 26, 1978.
30. Mott, Frank L.
Baker, Paula C.
Evaluation of the 1989 Child-Care Supplement in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Report NLS 92-6, Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, October 1989.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/ore/abstract/nl/nl890020.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Child Care; Contraception; Data Quality/Consistency; Mothers; Research Methodology

This report assesses a variety of data quality issues in the special 1989 NLSY child care supplement. Funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, the 1989 round of the NLSY included a special data collection designed to obtain maternal reports of current and usual child care arrangements and to assess the following three data quality issues: (1) the extent to which information collected on primary and secondary child care arrangements accurately reflects all child care use; (2) the extent to which mothers were able to reconstruct a retrospective of every child care arrangement used for at least 10 hours per week since the date of last interview; and (3) the validity and usefulness of a set of questions dealing with the mother's attitudes towards child care and the flexibility of available child care arrangements in meeting unusual or emergency situations. Data were collected from 347 mothers who were interviewed during the first month of the survey round. The report summarizes results of the special survey and presents recommendations for future child care data collections.
Bibliography Citation
Mott, Frank L. and Paula C. Baker. "Evaluation of the 1989 Child-Care Supplement in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Report NLS 92-6, Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, October 1989.
31. Olsen, Randall J.
Desirability of Partner Traits and Two Decades of Change in the Marriage Market: A One-and-a-Half Sex Model of Marriage
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/olsen.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Fertility; Gender; Labor Market Outcomes; Marriage

One of the unique features of the NLS program has been its continued interviews on the people originally sampled with proxy interviews being very rare. The individual, not the household or family unit, is the focus of the study and this makes the surveys powerful instruments for the study of lives over the long-run. As we look at ten years of data from the NLSY97, the project enables us to look at these lives through young adulthood, we can look at this new generation's experiences in the context of evolving opportunities and social norms and how those changes shape our society and the labor market.

One of the most significant decisions a person makes is the decision to marry, and while this decision may not affect the labor market immediately, in the long run it is a decision with such powerful effects that its impact on shaping the labor market is substantial even if not immediate. Marriage has important effects on fertility. At one time decisions on fertility and decisions on marriage were inextricably entwined. Over the past half-century, this connection has loosened considerably. … the focus of this paper is not on the change in the marriage rate. Instead, the question we seek to answer is whether the process of matching potential spouses with one another has fundamentally changed or not.

Bibliography Citation
Olsen, Randall J. "Desirability of Partner Traits and Two Decades of Change in the Marriage Market: A One-and-a-Half Sex Model of Marriage." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
32. Pergamit, Michael R.
Who Runs Away from Home?: An Exploratory Analysis
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/pergamit.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Runaways; Variables, Independent - Covariate

This paper represents exploratory analysis of the correlates of running away, the number of times a youth runs away, and the age at which a youth first runs away. At this point, we deal with running away as a static outcome, occurring any time before age 18. In the future, we plan to expand to a dynamic model where the decision to run away is made each year and independent variables can take on different values over time.
Bibliography Citation
Pergamit, Michael R. "Who Runs Away from Home?: An Exploratory Analysis." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
33. Pierret, Charles R.
Gladden, Tricia Lynn
Employment Before Age 16: Does It Make a Difference?
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/pierret.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Employment; Employment, In-School; Employment, Youth; Teenagers

In this paper, we will investigate the early employment experiences of young people and their correlation with medium term outcomes in the areas of education, employment, and social behavior. Ultimately, our goal is to determine which of the two perspectives has the greatest support. In this preliminary draft, we attempt to discover the relationships between early employment and these outcomes, while remaining agnostic about the causal relationships. We start with a review of the literature on early employment and its impacts. In Section II we talk briefly about the NLSY97 and the way in which early employment experiences are collected. We also look at what determines early employment and how employment progresses over time. Section III provides estimates of models of the relationship between early employment and medium-term outcomes. Section IV concludes.
Bibliography Citation
Pierret, Charles R. and Tricia Lynn Gladden. "Employment Before Age 16: Does It Make a Difference?." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
34. Pinkston, Joshua C.
Model of Asymmetric Employer Learning with Testable Implications
BLS Working Paper 365, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Department of Labor, January, 2003
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Labor Force Participation; Mobility, Labor Market; Wage Growth; Wage Models; Wages, Men

This paper develops and tests a unique model asymmetric employer learning. The previous literature on asymmetric learning assumes that a worker's employer is perfectly informed while outside firms possess only public information. This paper relaxes that assumption, allowing firms to profitably bid for employed workers under conditions that were not profitable in previous models. The model in this paper is the first in the literature to predict either wage growth without promotions or mobility between firms without firm- or match-specific productivity. The bidding through which firms compete for a worker produces a sequence of wages that converges to the current employer's conditional expectation of the worker's productivity. This convergence of wages allows the model to be tested using an extension of existing work on employer learning. Wage regressions estimated on a sample of men from the NLSY produce strong evidence of asymmetric learning.
Bibliography Citation
Pinkston, Joshua C. "Model of Asymmetric Employer Learning with Testable Implications." BLS Working Paper 365, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Department of Labor, January, 2003.
35. Rones, Philip L.
Retirement Decision: A Question of Opportunity
Report, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, 1980
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Age; Labor Supply; Legislation; Retirees; Retirement; Work Attitudes

The purpose of this paper was to discuss: (1) the problems in using labor force data to study casual factors of retirement trends; (2) the anticipation impact of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA); and (3) the political labor supply of current retirees. Current Population Survey data was analyzed, using results from other research such as the 1968 and 1969 Survey of Newly Entitled Beneficiaries, the Retirement History Study, the National Longitudinal Survey, and the 1974 Louis Harris Survey. Men and women in the 60-64 and 65+ age groups were analyzed separately. It was found that: (1) the complexity of forces influencing the retirement decision makes it difficult to infer causalities from labor force participation rate trends, since the impact of a single factor can easily be hidden by countering factors; (2) it is likely that the 1978 Amendments to the ADEA will have little short-term impact on the retirement decision; and (3) little is yet known about the extent to which people older than the "normal" retirement age wish to work. It was noted that the Department of Labor has contracted to do additional research on these subjects, which should dispel some of the confusion currently surrounding them. [AgeLine]
Bibliography Citation
Rones, Philip L. "Retirement Decision: A Question of Opportunity." Report, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, 1980.
36. Rones, Philip L.
Herz, Diane E.
Labor Market Problems of Older Workers
Report, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, 1989
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Discrimination, Age; Displaced Workers; Labor Force Participation; Occupational Segregation; Part-Time Work; Social Security; Unemployment Rate

This report, prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, analyzes labor market problems of displaced older workers. It reviews the available data on the extent and nature of unemployment, discouragement, and displacement and focuses on institutional arrangements, such as pension rules and the supply of part-time jobs that may limit the employment opportunities for older workers.
Bibliography Citation
Rones, Philip L. and Diane E. Herz. "Labor Market Problems of Older Workers." Report, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, 1989.
37. Walker, James R.
Choice Choice, Enrollment and Educational Attainment within the NLSY79 and NLSY97
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
Also: http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/Research/conferences/NLSYConf/pdf/nlsjc5.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): College Characteristics; College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; Household Income

I use information from two cohorts of the BLS's National Longitudinal Surveys to compare college choice, enrollment and educational attainment. I find a large increase in enrollment between cohorts and a smaller increase in educational attainment. Current household income affects enrollment and attainment and its role is stable across cohorts. The influence of ability on enrollment is several times larger than household income. Moreover, the role of ability appears to have changed between cohort: in the NLSY79 ability determines who attends college (at either a two–year or four–year school) while for the NLSY97, with entry into college apparently available to all, ability determines who enrolls in four–year schools.
Bibliography Citation
Walker, James R. "Choice Choice, Enrollment and Educational Attainment within the NLSY79 and NLSY97." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
38. Wolpin, Kenneth I.
Merlo, Antonio
Youth Crime and High School Completion
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Crime; High School Diploma; Youth Problems

Bibliography Citation
Wolpin, Kenneth I. and Antonio Merlo. "Youth Crime and High School Completion." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.
39. Wu, Lawrence L.
Martin, Steven P.
Kaufman, Pamela
Two Decades of Change in Premarital First Births: Cohort Comparisons from the NLSY79 and NLSY97
Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital

Bibliography Citation
Wu, Lawrence L., Steven P. Martin and Pamela Kaufman. "Two Decades of Change in Premarital First Births: Cohort Comparisons from the NLSY79 and NLSY97." Presented: Washington, DC, Bureau of Labor Statistics Conference Center, NLSY97 Tenth Anniversary Conference, May 29-30, 2008.