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Source: British Journal of Industrial Relations (BJIR)
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Borghans, Lex
Golsteyn, Bart H.H.
Job Mobility in Europe, Japan and the United States
British Journal of Industrial Relations 50,3 (September 2012): 436-456.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8543.2011.00848.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Careers after Higher Education: a European Research Study (CHEERS); College Graduates; Cross-national Analysis; Germany, German; Japan; Japanese; Labor Market Studies, Geographic; Mobility, Job; Sweden, Swedish

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Evidence about job mobility outside the United States is scarce and difficult to compare cross-nationally because of non-uniform data. We document job mobility patterns of college graduates in their first three years in the labour market, using unique uniform data covering 11 European countries and Japan. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we replicate the information in this survey to compare the results with the United States. We find that (a) US graduates hold more jobs than European graduates, (b) contrasting conventional wisdom, job mobility in Japan is only somewhat lower than the European average, and (c) there are large differences in job mobility within Europe.
Bibliography Citation
Borghans, Lex and Bart H.H. Golsteyn. "Job Mobility in Europe, Japan and the United States." British Journal of Industrial Relations 50,3 (September 2012): 436-456.
2. Kosteas, Vasilios D.
High School Clubs Participation and Future Supervisory Status
British Journal of Industrial Relations 49,s1 (June 2011): s181-s206
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Extracurricular Activities/Sports; High School; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Probit; Occupational Status; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article examines the relationship between high school clubs participation and the probability that a worker will become a supervisor and the types of responsibility she will have, using the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979 dataset. While other articles have tried to explain what affects a worker's probability of being a supervisor, this article focuses on the impact of participation in extracurricular activities during high school. Both probit and household fixed effects estimates show that clubs participation raises the probability that an individual will be a supervisor and have high-level supervisory responsibilities.
Bibliography Citation
Kosteas, Vasilios D. "High School Clubs Participation and Future Supervisory Status." British Journal of Industrial Relations 49,s1 (June 2011): s181-s206.
3. Mantovan, Noemi
Sauer, Robert M.
Wilson, John
The Effect of Work-schedule Control on Volunteering among Early Career Employees
British Journal of Industrial Relations (BJIR) published online (5 October 2021): DOI: 10.1111/bjir.12642.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bjir.12642
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Control; Volunteer Work; Wages; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent trends in the labor market see increasing numbers of workers having to deal with 'schedule precarity' including volatile hours, rotating shift work, unpredictable work hours and lack of choice on the part of the employee. These trends are of concern to those interested in fostering levels of civic engagement because they potentially limit volunteering. This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) containing information on work schedules in 2011 and 2013 among employees to determine the effect of changes in work schedules on becoming a volunteer using transition regressions. We investigate interactions between work-schedule measures and pay structure because workers paid by the hour have lower volunteer rates than salaried workers. The study finds that, while three of the schedule dimensions are unrelated to volunteering, transitioning toward more schedule control has a positive effect on volunteering. However, interaction analysis shows this positive effect is confined to salaried workers whereas for hourly paid workers the effect is negative. The results support the idea that having more freedom to set one's work schedule reduces work-life conflict but suggest that this positive effect is limited to those who can take advantage of it.
Bibliography Citation
Mantovan, Noemi, Robert M. Sauer and John Wilson. "The Effect of Work-schedule Control on Volunteering among Early Career Employees." British Journal of Industrial Relations (BJIR) published online (5 October 2021): DOI: 10.1111/bjir.12642.