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Source: basic books
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Cherlin, Andrew J.
Work Life and Marital Dissolution
In: Divorce and Separation: Context, Causes and Consequences. G. Levinger and O. Moles, eds. New York, NY: Basic Books, 1979
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Harper Collins Publishers
Keyword(s): Divorce; Family Resources; Husbands, Income; Job Tenure; Marital Dissolution; Mobility, Job; Wives, Income; Work Attitudes; Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Work lives affect family lives. A growing body of evidence suggests that whether and when we marry, how many children we have, and whether a marriage ends in divorce are all determined, in part, by employment and income. Two influences, aspects of a couple's economic situation, seem to have the most substantive importance in affecting marital dissolution. First, greater stability of the husband's employment decreased the probability of dissolution, independent of income levels. Second, wives whose potential wage compared favorably with the wage of their husbands had a greater probability of dissolution. The evidence suggests that the relationship between two married partners' work lives and their chances of divorcing or separating is more complex than earlier studies implied.
Bibliography Citation
Cherlin, Andrew J. "Work Life and Marital Dissolution" In: Divorce and Separation: Context, Causes and Consequences. G. Levinger and O. Moles, eds. New York, NY: Basic Books, 1979
2. Heymann, S. Jody
The Widening Gap: Why American Working Families Are in Jeopardy and What Can Be Done About It
New York, NY: Basic Books, The Perseus Books Group, 2000
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Perseus Books Group
Keyword(s): Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); School Completion; Shift Workers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examines the growing gap between the child and elder care needs of families and the resources that they have to meet these responsibilities. Principal data sources include the Urban Working Families Study, the Daily Diaries Study, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, and the Survey of Midlife in the United States. Together, the studies utilize interviews with more than 7,500 caregivers to explore how Americans of all ages are working while addressing the health, educational, and urgent-care needs of children, older parents, and other adults. Results focus on the unpredictable lives of working adults, the impact of outdated working conditions and inadequate social supports on children, the impact on extended families, the magnification of economic inequalities, and gender inequalities in child and elder care. Case studies are used to illustrate the findings. References are included. Appendixes provide additional information on the data sources and results. (MM) (AgeLine Database, copyright 2003 AARP, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Heymann, S. Jody. The Widening Gap: Why American Working Families Are in Jeopardy and What Can Be Done About It. New York, NY: Basic Books, The Perseus Books Group, 2000.