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Source: BMC Public Health
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Hamad, Rita
Brown, Daniel M.
Basu, Sanjay
The Association of County-level Socioeconomic Factors with Individual Tobacco and Alcohol Use: A Longitudinal Study of U.S. Adults
BMC Public Health 19 (December 2019): 390.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12889-019-6700-x
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Geocoded Data; Local Area Unemployment; Socioeconomic Factors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Place-based factors have been implicated as root causes of socioeconomic disparities in risky health behaviors such as tobacco and alcohol use. Yet few studies examine the effects of county-level socioeconomic characteristics, despite the fact that social and public health policies are often implemented at the county level. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that county-level socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with individual tobacco and alcohol use.
Bibliography Citation
Hamad, Rita, Daniel M. Brown and Sanjay Basu. "The Association of County-level Socioeconomic Factors with Individual Tobacco and Alcohol Use: A Longitudinal Study of U.S. Adults." BMC Public Health 19 (December 2019): 390.
2. Lown, E. Anne
Lui, Camillia K.
Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J.
Mulia, Nina
Williams, Edwina
Ye, Yu
Li, Libo
Greenfield, Thomas K.
Kerr, William C.
Adverse Childhood Events and Risk of Diabetes Onset in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort
BMC Public Health 19 (December 2019): DOI: 10.1186/s12889-019-7337-5.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12889-019-7337-5
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Health, Chronic Conditions; Obesity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: Type 2 diabetes is a major public health problem with considerable personal and societal costs. Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) are associated with a number of serious and chronic health problems in adulthood, but these experiences have not been adequately studied in relation to diabetes in a US national sample. The association between ACE and poor health can be partially explained by greater risky health behaviors (RHB) such as smoking, heavy alcohol use, or obesity. Few studies have examined ACE in relation to adult onset Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) taking into account the role of RHB. Using longitudinal data from a representative US population sample followed over 30 years, this study examines the impact of ACE on the risk of diabetes onset.

Methods: Data from the 1982 to 2012 waves of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were analyzed, spanning ages 14 to 56. Bivariate and discrete-time survival models were used to assess the relationships between ACE and RHB including smoking, alcohol use, and obesity, and subsequent onset of diabetes.

Conclusion: ACE predicted diabetes onset among women, though this relationship was attenuated when controlling for BMI. Being overweight or obese was significantly more common among women with a history of ACE, which suggests BMI may be on the pathway from ACE to diabetes onset for women.

Bibliography Citation
Lown, E. Anne, Camillia K. Lui, Katherine J. Karriker-Jaffe, Nina Mulia, Edwina Williams, Yu Ye, Libo Li, Thomas K. Greenfield and William C. Kerr. "Adverse Childhood Events and Risk of Diabetes Onset in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort." BMC Public Health 19 (December 2019): DOI: 10.1186/s12889-019-7337-5.
3. Mooyaart, Jarl
Liefbroer, Aart C.
Billari, Francesco
Becoming Obese in Young Adulthood: The Role of Career-Family Pathways in the Transition to Adulthood for Men and Women
BMC Public Health 19: 1511 (December 2019): DOI: 10.1186/s12889-019-7797-7.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12889-019-7797-7
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; College Education; Family Background and Culture; Family Formation; Family Income; Obesity; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Methods: We use data from the NLSY97, a U.S. nationally representative panel survey conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics between 1997 to 2013 (N = 4688), and apply multichannel sequence analysis in order to identify clusters of typical career-family pathways during the transition to adulthood (age 17 to 27), and subsequently investigate whether these pathways are associated with becoming obese at the end of young adulthood (age 28), using logistic regression. We control for obesity at age 17 and family background factors (race, parental education, parental income, and family structure). To take into account the fact that the transition to adulthood has a different meaning for men and for women, we also interact career-family clusters with gender. Results: For women, pathways characterized by college education, early home leaving, and postponement of family formation decrease the probability of becoming obese. For men, pathways characterized by early marriage increase the probability of becoming obese.
Bibliography Citation
Mooyaart, Jarl, Aart C. Liefbroer and Francesco Billari. "Becoming Obese in Young Adulthood: The Role of Career-Family Pathways in the Transition to Adulthood for Men and Women." BMC Public Health 19: 1511 (December 2019): DOI: 10.1186/s12889-019-7797-7.