Search Results

Source: B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy
Resulting in 16 citations.
1. Barnes, Michael G.
Smith, Trenton G.
Tobacco Use as Response to Economic Insecurity: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 9,1 (5 November 2009): Article 47.
Also: http://www.bepress.com/bejeap/vol9/iss1/art47/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Berkeley Electronic Press (bpress)
Keyword(s): Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Economic Changes/Recession; Economic Well-Being; Heterogeneity; Household Income; Income Risk; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Variables, Instrumental

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

[B.E. = Berkeley Electronic Press]

Emerging evidence from neuroscience and clinical research suggests a novel hypothesis about tobacco use: consumers may choose to smoke, in part, as a 'self-medicating' response to the presence of economic insecurity. To test this hypothesis, we examine the effect of economic insecurity (roughly, the risk of catastrophic income loss) on the smoking behavior of a sample of male working-age smokers from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79). Using instrumental variables to control for unobserved heterogeneity, we find that economic insecurity has a large and statistically significant positive effect on the decision to continue or resume smoking. Our results indicate, for example, that a 1 percent increase in the probability of becoming unemployed causes an individual to be 2.4 percent more likely to continue smoking. We find that the explanatory power of economic insecurity in predicting tobacco use is comparable to (but distinct from) household income, a more commonly used metric.

Bibliography Citation
Barnes, Michael G. and Trenton G. Smith. "Tobacco Use as Response to Economic Insecurity: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 9,1 (5 November 2009): Article 47.
2. Barnette, Justin
Odongo, Kennedy
Reynolds, C. Lockwood
Changes Over Time in the Cost of Job Loss for Young Men and Women
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy published online (30 November 2020): DOI: 10.1515/bejeap-2020-0005.
Also: https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/bejeap-2020-0005/html
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Job Separation/Loss; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the two cohorts of the NLSY, we examine whether income losses due to involuntary job separations have changed over time. We find that wage losses among men are similar between the two cohorts. However, women in the 1979 cohort show little evidence of wage losses while women in the 1997 cohort experience wage losses similar to those of men. We present evidence that changes in occupations across cohorts help explain these results.
Bibliography Citation
Barnette, Justin, Kennedy Odongo and C. Lockwood Reynolds. "Changes Over Time in the Cost of Job Loss for Young Men and Women." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy published online (30 November 2020): DOI: 10.1515/bejeap-2020-0005.
3. Beauchamp, Andrew
Chan, Stacey
The Minimum Wage and Crime
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 14,3 (2014): 1213-1235.
Also: https://doi.org/10.1515/bejeap-2013-0130
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Crime; Legislation; Minimum Wage; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Does crime respond to changes in the minimum wage? A growing body of empirical evidence indicates that increases in the minimum wage have a displacement effect on low-skilled workers. Economic reasoning provides the possibility that disemployment may cause youth to substitute from legal work to crime. However, there is also the countervailing effect of a higher wage raising the opportunity cost of crime for those who remain employed. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort to measure the effect of increases in the minimum wage on self-reported criminal activity and examine employment-crime substitution. Exploiting changes in state and federal minimum wage laws from 1997 to 2010, we find that workers who are affected by a change in the minimum wage are more likely to commit crime, become idle, and lose employment. Individuals experiencing a binding minimum wage change were more likely to commit crime and work only part time. Analyzing heterogeneity shows those with past criminal connections are especially likely to see decreased employment and increased crime following a policy change, suggesting that reduced employment effects dominate any wage effects. The findings have implications for policy regarding both the low-wage labor market and efforts to deter criminal activity.
Bibliography Citation
Beauchamp, Andrew and Stacey Chan. "The Minimum Wage and Crime." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 14,3 (2014): 1213-1235.
4. Fairlie, Robert W.
Woodruff, Christopher M.
Mexican-American Entrepreneurship
B.E. Journals of Economic Analysis and Policy: Frontiers of Economic Analysis and Policy 10,1 (2010).
Also: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=907681
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Berkeley Electronic Press (bpress)
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Immigrants

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We conduct a comprehensive analysis of Mexican-American entrepreneurship. We find that low levels of education and wealth explain the entire gap between Mexican immigrants and non- Latino whites in business formation rates; together with language ability, these factors explain nearly the entire gap in business income. Legal status represents an additional barrier for Mexican immigrants, reducing business ownership rates by 0.7 percentage points. Human and financial capital deficiencies limit business ownership and business success among second and third-generation Mexican-Americans to a lesser extent. These findings have implications for the debates over the assimilation of Mexican-Americans in the United States. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

[Editor's note:] Synthetic control groups are created using Census, CPS and the NLSY data for comparison to undocumented Mexican immigrants in the LPS [Legalized Population Survey] data.

Bibliography Citation
Fairlie, Robert W. and Christopher M. Woodruff. "Mexican-American Entrepreneurship." B.E. Journals of Economic Analysis and Policy: Frontiers of Economic Analysis and Policy 10,1 (2010).
5. Gittleman, Maury
Medicaid and Wealth: A Re-Examination
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 11,1 (2011): 69
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Medicaid/Medicare; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Savings; Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP); Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Do public insurance programs crowd out private savings? I examine the relationship between Medicaid and wealth and make a contribution to the literature on this issue in two primary ways. First, I apply the instrumental-variables approach developed by Gruber and Yelowitz (1999) to a different dataset, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 (NLSY79), while at the same time examining an alternative instrument. The results turn out to differ depending on the instrument and, for one of the instruments, to be sensitive to assumptions needed to identify Medicaid's effects. Second, I make use of the SIPP data employed by Gruber and Yelowitz themselves, and examine the sensitivity of their conclusions to omitted factors that may be related to both Medicaid eligibility and to wealth accumulation. While more robust than the results using the NLSY79, the SIPP estimates are found to depend both on the sample used and on certain specification restrictions. Taken together, the results suggest caution in making inferences about the impact of Medicaid on wealth.
Bibliography Citation
Gittleman, Maury. "Medicaid and Wealth: A Re-Examination." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 11,1 (2011): 69.
6. Hershbein, Brad
Graduating High School in a Recession: Work, Education, and Home Production
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 12,1 (January 2012): Article 3.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3409569/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Economic Changes/Recession; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates; Labor Force Participation; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper explores how high school graduate men and women vary in their behavioral responses to beginning labor market entry during a recession. In contrast with previous related literature that found a substantial negative wage impact but minimal employment impact in samples of highly educated men, the empirical evidence presented here suggests a different outcome for the less well educated, and between the sexes. Women, but not men, who graduate high school in an adverse labor market are less likely to be in the workforce for the next four years, but longer-term effects are minimal. Further, while men increase their enrollment as a short-run response to weak labor demand, women do not; instead, they appear to temporarily substitute into home production. Women’s wages are less affected then men’s, and both groups’ wages are less affected than the college graduates previously studied.
Bibliography Citation
Hershbein, Brad. "Graduating High School in a Recession: Work, Education, and Home Production." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 12,1 (January 2012): Article 3.
7. Lanning, Jonathan A.
Opportunities Denied, Wages Diminished: Using Search Theory to Translate Audit-Pair Study Findings into Wage Differentials
The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy published online (28 August 2013): DOI: 10.1515/bejeap-2012-0055.
Also: https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/bejeap-2012-0055/html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Job; Labor Market Outcomes; Modeling; Racial Differences; Wage Gap

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article proposes a framework with which to estimate the impact on labor market outcomes implied by audit-pair study findings. I present a search model with discrimination and calibrate the model with experimental data from audit studies of the U.S. labor market and the NLSY79 to estimate the wage and unemployment implications of documented hiring disparity. All simulated results are highly consistent with the hypothesis that hiring discrimination may be an important component of the observed labor market disparity between African American and white workers in the U.S. Additionally, while the simulations only generate a small proportion of the observed gaps in unemployment, it proves to be one of the few models capable of explaining simultaneous wage in unemployment gaps. The most robust finding of the article is that non-trivial wage gaps can result even from the seemingly small differences in hiring rates documented in these studies.
Bibliography Citation
Lanning, Jonathan A. "Opportunities Denied, Wages Diminished: Using Search Theory to Translate Audit-Pair Study Findings into Wage Differentials." The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy published online (28 August 2013): DOI: 10.1515/bejeap-2012-0055.
8. Maclean, Johanna Catherine
Hill, Terrence D.
Economic Conditions at School Leaving and Sleep Patterns Across the Life Course
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 17,2 (2017): DOI: doi.org/10.1515/bejeap-2016-0142.
Also: https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/bejeap-2016-0142/html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): CESD (Depression Scale); College Degree; College Dropouts; Economic Changes/Recession; Sleep

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use data drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort to study the effects of leaving school in an economic downturn on sleep quality and quantity. We account for the potential endogeneity of economic conditions at school leaving using instrumental variables based on birth year and early state of residence. We find that men who leave school in an economic downturn initially experience lower quality sleep, but these men are able to experience improved sleep quality over time. Women who leave school in an economic downturn experience better sleep quality, although the effect emerges over time. We find that leaving school in an economic downturn increases sleep quantity among men and women. We document heterogeneity by work type.
Bibliography Citation
Maclean, Johanna Catherine and Terrence D. Hill. "Economic Conditions at School Leaving and Sleep Patterns Across the Life Course." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 17,2 (2017): DOI: doi.org/10.1515/bejeap-2016-0142.
9. Norton, Edward C.
Nicholas, Lauren H.
Huang, Sean Sheng-Hsiu
Informal Care and Inter-vivos Transfers: Results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 14,2 (May 2013): 377-400.
Also: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bejeap.2014.14.issue-2/bejeap-2012-0062/bejeap-2012-0062.xml
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Caregivers, Adult Children; Inheritance; Transfers, Financial

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Informal care is the largest source of long-term care for elderly, surpassing home health care and nursing home care. By definition, informal care is unpaid. It remains a puzzle why so many adult children give freely of their time. Transfers of time to the older generation may be balanced by financial transfers going to the younger generation. This leads to the question of whether informal care and inter-vivos transfers are causally related. We analyze data from the 1999 and 2003 waves of National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women. We examine whether the elderly parents give more inter-vivos monetary transfers to adult children who provide informal care, by examining both the extensive and intensive margins of financial transfers and of informal care. We find statistically significant results that a child who provides informal care is more likely to receive inter-vivos transfers than a sibling who does not. If a child does provide care, there is no statistically significant effect on the amount of the transfer.
Bibliography Citation
Norton, Edward C., Lauren H. Nicholas and Sean Sheng-Hsiu Huang. "Informal Care and Inter-vivos Transfers: Results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 14,2 (May 2013): 377-400.
10. Okumura, Tsunao
Usui, Emiko
Do Parents' Social Skills Influence Their Children's Sociability?
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 14,3 (January 2014): 1081-1116.
Also: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bejeap.2014.14.issue-3/bejeap-2013-0077/bejeap-2013-0077.xml?format=INT
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Children, School-Age; Children, Temperament; Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT); Gender Differences; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Labor Market Outcomes; Occupational Choice; Parenting Skills/Styles; Shyness; Sociability/Socialization/Social Interaction; Social Capital; Temperament; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article uses the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) to examine the effect of parents' social skills on their children's sociability. Similar to many other national surveys, this survey lacks detailed information on parents. To remedy this deficiency, we construct a measure of parents' sociability skills based on their occupational characteristics extracted from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT). Even after controlling for a variety of background characteristics, including cognitive skills, we find that the sociability relationships between fathers and sons and between mothers and daughters remain statistically significant. We find that the dollar value to the sons of a given increase in their fathers' sociability is one-sixth of the value to the sons of the same standard-deviation increase in their fathers' education.
Bibliography Citation
Okumura, Tsunao and Emiko Usui. "Do Parents' Social Skills Influence Their Children's Sociability?" B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 14,3 (January 2014): 1081-1116.
11. Shin, Donggyun
Recent Trends in Men's Earnings Volatility: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1985-2009
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 12,2 (October 2012): .
Also: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bejeap.2012.12.issue-2/1935-1682.3339/1935-1682.3339.xml?format=INT
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Earnings; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Evidence on recent trends in men’s earnings volatility from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) has been found to be at odds with evidence from some other sources. This study adds evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, which turns out to be more consistent with the PSID.
Bibliography Citation
Shin, Donggyun. "Recent Trends in Men's Earnings Volatility: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1985-2009." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 12,2 (October 2012): .
12. Sorokina, Olga V.
Constraints in the Demand for Education: What Can we Learn from Subjective Assessments?
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy 12,1 (2012): 43.
Also: https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/1935-1682.2138/html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Credit/Credit Constraint; Educational Attainment; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While the large disparities in educational attainment by socioeconomic status in the United States point towards the importance of credit constraints, there is no consensus in the economic literature regarding their pervasiveness. To evaluate how subjective information can enhance our understanding of the role of credit constraints in education, I focus on NLSY79 respondents' assessments of financial obstacles to schooling. About 12 percent of young adults in the data expect to underinvest in education because of financial reasons or the need to work. Using this information in a regression model of educational attainment shows that it provides valuable behavioral insights, above and beyond standard measures of income and family background.
Bibliography Citation
Sorokina, Olga V. "Constraints in the Demand for Education: What Can we Learn from Subjective Assessments?" B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy 12,1 (2012): 43.
13. Speer, Jamin D.
Wages, Hours, and the School-to-Work Transition: The Consequences of Leaving School in a Recession for Less-Educated Men
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 16,1 (January 2016): 97-124.
Also: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bejeap.2016.16.issue-1/bejeap-2015-0054/bejeap-2015-0054.xml
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Economic Changes/Recession; Educational Attainment; Labor Market Outcomes; Transition, School to Work; Wages; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using the NLSY's weekly work history data to precisely measure labor market outcomes and the school-to-work transition, I document severe but short-lived effects of leaving school in a recession for men with 9-12 years of education. I find significant effects of entry labor market conditions on wages, job quality, and the transition time from school to work. In contrast to published evidence on more educated workers, I also find large effects on work hours on both the extensive and the intensive margins. When workers leave high school in a recession, they take substantially longer to find a job, earn lower wages, and work fewer full-time weeks and more part-time weeks. A 4-point rise in the initial unemployment rate leads to an increase in the school-to-work transition time of 9 weeks, a 16% decline in year-one average wage, a 28% fall in hours worked in the first year, and a 45% decline in first-year earnings. However, effects of entry conditions are not persistent and are largely gone after the first year.
Bibliography Citation
Speer, Jamin D. "Wages, Hours, and the School-to-Work Transition: The Consequences of Leaving School in a Recession for Less-Educated Men." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 16,1 (January 2016): 97-124.
14. Vidal-Fernández, Marian
The Effect of Minimum Academic Requirements to Participate in Sports on High School Graduation
The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy 11,1 (August 2011): .
Also: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bejeap.2011.11.issue-1/bejeap.2011.11.1.2380/bejeap.2011.11.1.2380.xml?rskey=v7VL8y&result=1&q=vidal-fernandez
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Athletics (see SPORTS); Cross-national Analysis; Data Linkage (also see Record Linkage); Extracurricular Activities/Sports; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Curriculum; Sports (also see ATHLETICS)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

During the 1970s, state interscholastic associations imposed rules requiring student athletes to pass a certain number of subjects in order to be allowed to participate in school sports. Using the NLSY together with a newly collected dataset on the stringency of the rules, I exploit variation in the rules across states to estimate their effects on high school graduation. I find that requiring students to pass one additional course is associated with a two-percentage-point increase in the likelihood of graduation. This result survives a number of robustness checks, including finding no effect for female students who at the time had limited access to interscholastic competitions.
Bibliography Citation
Vidal-Fernández, Marian. "The Effect of Minimum Academic Requirements to Participate in Sports on High School Graduation." The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy 11,1 (August 2011): .
15. Yörük, Baris K.
Health Insurance Coverage and Risky Health Behaviors among Young Adults
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 17,3 (2017): DOI: 10.1515/bejeap-2016-0282. Also:
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Insurance, Health; Sexual Behavior; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates the relationship between health insurance coverage and risky health behaviors among young adults using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 Cohort (NLSY97). Before the Affordable Care Act required all employers in the United States to provide health insurance to employees' children until the age of 26 (before September 2010), many health insurance contracts covered dependents up until age 19. Using a regression discontinuity design framework, I find that approximately 6 percent of young adults lose their health insurance coverage once they turn 19. I also find that although losing health insurance coverage at age 19 does not have any significant impact on smoking, marijuana use, and risky sexual behaviors among young adults, it decreases the probability of consuming 5 or more drinks a day by approximately 2 percentage points. These results are robust under several different parametric and non-parametric models and not sensitive to the selection of samples based on gender.
Bibliography Citation
Yörük, Baris K. "Health Insurance Coverage and Risky Health Behaviors among Young Adults." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 17,3 (2017): DOI: 10.1515/bejeap-2016-0282.
16. Yörük, Ceren Ertan
The Effect of Alcohol Consumption on Labor Market Outcomes of Young Adults: Evidence from Minimum Legal Drinking Age Laws
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 15,3 (2015): 1297-1324.
Also: https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/bejeap-2014-0104/html?lang=en
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Geocoded Data; Labor Market Outcomes; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses a regression discontinuity design to estimate the impact of the minimum legal drinking age (MLDA) laws on alcohol consumption and labor market outcomes of young adults. Using confidential data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 Cohort (NLSY97), I find that granting legal access to alcohol at age 21 leads to an increase in several measures of alcohol consumption. The discrete jump in the alcohol consumption at the MLDA has also negative spillover effects on the labor market outcomes of young adults. In particular, I document that the MLDA is associated with a 1 hour decrease in weekly working hours. However, the effect of the MLDA laws on wages is negative only under certain specifications. These results suggest that the policies designed to curb drinking may not only have desirable effects in reducing alcohol consumption among young adults but also have positive spillover effects on their labor market outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Yörük, Ceren Ertan. "The Effect of Alcohol Consumption on Labor Market Outcomes of Young Adults: Evidence from Minimum Legal Drinking Age Laws." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 15,3 (2015): 1297-1324.