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Source: Applied Economics Letters
Resulting in 15 citations.
1. Andini, Corrado
Returns to Education and Wage Equations: a Dynamic Approach
Applied Economics Letters 14,8 (June 2007): 577-579.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504850500461555
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Education; Educational Returns; Modeling; Wage Differentials; Wage Equations

We study the impact of education on within-groups wage inequality using quantile-regression techniques and U.S. data for the period of 1980-1987. Our contribution consists of comparing estimates based on a standard Mincer equation with estimates based on a modified Mincer equation in which past earnings play the role of additional explanatory variable. We find that a dynamic model does not give the same answer as a static model regarding the impact of schooling on earnings dispersion, and provide an explanation for this result. [Abstract from the Author]

Data are from the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for the period of 1980-1987

Bibliography Citation
Andini, Corrado. "Returns to Education and Wage Equations: a Dynamic Approach." Applied Economics Letters 14,8 (June 2007): 577-579.
2. Averett, Susan L.
Stifel, David C.
Race and Gender Differences in The Cognitive Effects of Childhood Overweight
Applied Economics Letters 17,17 (March 2010): 1673-1679.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504850903251256
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Gender Differences; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Racial Differences; Variables, Instrumental; Weight

The increase in the prevalence of overweight children (ages 6-13 years) in the United States over the past two decades is likely to result in adverse public health consequences. We use data from the children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort to investigate an additional consequence of childhood overweight - its effect on relative cognitive development. To control for unobserved heterogeneity, we estimate individual (child) fixed effect (FE) models and instrumental variable (IV) models. Although recent research suggests that there is a negligible effect of childhood overweight on cognitive ability, our results demonstrate that the effects are uncovered when examining the relationship separately by race. In particular, we find that overweight white boys have math and reading scores approximately an SD lower than the mean. Overweight white girls have lower math scores whereas overweight black boys and girls have lower reading scores. Our results suggest that in addition to well-documented health consequences, overweight children may also be at risk in terms of experiencing adverse education outcomes, which could lead to lower future wages. Also in: The Applied Economics of Weight and Obesity, Edited by Mark P. Taylor; Routledge, 2013; pp.68-74.
Bibliography Citation
Averett, Susan L. and David C. Stifel. "Race and Gender Differences in The Cognitive Effects of Childhood Overweight." Applied Economics Letters 17,17 (March 2010): 1673-1679.
3. Chatterjee, Swarnankur
Finke, Michael S.
Harness, Nathaniel J.
The Impact of Self-Efficacy on Wealth Accumulation and Portfolio Choice
Applied Economics Letters 18,7 (2011): 627-631.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504851003761830
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Assets; Behavior; Demography; Financial Investments; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Self-Perception; Self-Regulation/Self-Control; Socioeconomic Factors; Wealth

Self-efficacy is a psychological construct based on the evaluations of one's ability to accomplish certain behaviours or achieve certain outcomes (Bandura, 1977). Although self-efficacy has been linked to health, task accomplishment, greater socio-economic status and income (Seeman and Seeman, 1983; Stretcher et al., 1986; Gecas and Seff, 1990; Judge et al., 2002; Zagorsky, 2007), there has been no study that investigates whether self-efficacy is also a predictor of greater wealth creation over a specific period of time. Applying a theoretical framework based on self-efficacy, this article investigates household financial behaviours using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) data-set. For the purpose of this study, change in wealth across time and financial market participation is modelled as a function of socio-economic and demographic variables drawn from prior literature. Findings from this research reveal that self-efficacy is indeed a predictor of investment for financial assets and is also a predictor of wealth creation across time.
Bibliography Citation
Chatterjee, Swarnankur, Michael S. Finke and Nathaniel J. Harness. "The Impact of Self-Efficacy on Wealth Accumulation and Portfolio Choice." Applied Economics Letters 18,7 (2011): 627-631.
4. Danyal, Shah
Maskara, Pankaj
Naqvi, Annaheeta
Impact of Computer Skills on Wages in USA
Applied Economics Letters 18,11 (July 2011): 1077-1081.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504851.2010.524607
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Computer Use; Skills; Wage Differentials; Wage Gap; Wages

Using US NLSY panel data set, staggered every 2 years from 2000 to 2006 for a cross section of 12,686 individuals, we investigate the effect of computer skills on wages. We use the definition of computer skills as having a personal computer with Microsoft Windows at home. Unlike most previous studies in the United States, which used instrumental variables for controlling the unobserved factors, we use fixed-effects estimation methodology. Based on the unique data set and the robust fixed-effects estimation, we find that individuals possessing computer skills earn a wage premium.

Copyright of Applied Economics Letters is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Danyal, Shah, Pankaj Maskara and Annaheeta Naqvi. "Impact of Computer Skills on Wages in USA." Applied Economics Letters 18,11 (July 2011): 1077-1081.
5. Dhar, Paramita
Robinson, Christina
Physical Activity and Childhood Obesity
Applied Economics Letters 23,8 (May 2016): 584-587.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504851.2015.1090541
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Obesity; Physical Activity (see also Exercise)

More than one-third of American children and teenagers are considered overweight or obese. Unfortunately, obesity is often a persistent and dangerous health condition that is costly to manage. It is one of the leading causes of preventable death and combating the condition has become a national priority. To this end the two most common recommendations are: eat a healthier diet and increase physical activity. Using data from both the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the NLSY79 Children and Young Adult files, this study examines the relationship between physical activity and the persistence of childhood obesity. More specifically, Cox-proportional hazard techniques are used to quantify the impact a child's physical activity has on the likelihood that they exit an overweight or obese state. Results indicate that being physically active reduces the probability that an overweight or obese child remains overweight or obese. Strikingly, there is not a significant difference between children who are active daily and those who are active a few times per week, suggesting that being active may be more important than the frequency of activity.
Bibliography Citation
Dhar, Paramita and Christina Robinson. "Physical Activity and Childhood Obesity." Applied Economics Letters 23,8 (May 2016): 584-587.
6. Gabriel, Paul E.
Differences in Earnings, Skills and Labour Market Experience Among Young Black and White Men
Applied Economics Letters 11,6 (2004): 337-342.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1350485042000228150
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Earnings; Racial Differences; Skills; Wage Gap; Work Experience

This study examines the role of racial differences in skills and labour market experience on recent earnings differences between young black and white men. Our analysis of the 2000 sample of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Cohort (NLSY79), indicates that nearly all of the earnings gap between black and white men can be accounted for with a relatively parsimonious empirical model. In particular, it finds that approximately 44% of the racial earnings gap results from higher average skill and work experience levels of white men. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Gabriel, Paul E. "Differences in Earnings, Skills and Labour Market Experience Among Young Black and White Men." Applied Economics Letters 11,6 (2004): 337-342.
7. Gabriel, Paul E.
Schmitz, Susanne
A Longitudinal Analysis of the Union Wage Premium for US Workers
Applied Economics Letters 21,7 (May 2014): 487-489.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504851.2013.868583#.Uw49_xDvDpV
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Unions; Wages

Estimates of the union wage premium for US workers are presented based on longitudinal data from the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Our results indicate that the long-term private-sector union wage premium for men has remained fairly steady at nearly 22% over the period 1990 to 2010. For women, the wage premium exhibits greater volatility, although no clear downward trend, and is approximately one-half of the male premium.
Bibliography Citation
Gabriel, Paul E. and Susanne Schmitz. "A Longitudinal Analysis of the Union Wage Premium for US Workers." Applied Economics Letters 21,7 (May 2014): 487-489.
8. Gius, Mark Paul
The Effects of Curfews on Juvenile Criminal Activity: An Individual-Level Analysis
Applied Economics Letters 18,4 (March 2011): 311-313.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504851003689643
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Arrests; Behavior, Antisocial; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Geocoded Data

The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of juvenile curfews on the criminal activities of young adults. Using individual-level data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - Geocode (NLSY) data set and estimating an economic model of crime for young adults, this study finds that although curfews have no statistically significant effect on the criminal behaviour of young adults, they do have a negative effect on the arrests of young adults. These results differ somewhat from the results of prior studies but lend support to community officials who believe that curfews are an effective tool in combating juvenile crime.
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "The Effects of Curfews on Juvenile Criminal Activity: An Individual-Level Analysis." Applied Economics Letters 18,4 (March 2011): 311-313.
9. Lemke, Robert J.
Rischall, Isaac C.
Skill, Parental Income, and IV Estimation of the Returns to Schooling
Applied Economics Letters 10,5 (April 17, 2003): 281-287.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504850320000078653
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Educational Returns; Human Capital; Income; Schooling; Skills; Training, On-the-Job; Wage Equations

Recently, attention has moved away from using parental backgronnd variables, such as parental education, in favour of using institutional features of the education system as instruments when estimating the return to schooling, In this paper, these possible instruments are revisited. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, several specifications of the wage equation are estimated and three types of instruments used - parental education, quarter of birth, and college proximity. It is shown that under some specificalions - in particular, by including parental income and individual skill in the wage equation - parental education appears to be a valid and useful instrument. On the other hand, when using the institutional instruments, the weak correlation between the instruments and years of schooling produces imprecise and likely biased estimates of the return to schooling. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Lemke, Robert J. and Isaac C. Rischall. "Skill, Parental Income, and IV Estimation of the Returns to Schooling." Applied Economics Letters 10,5 (April 17, 2003): 281-287.
10. Martin, Terrance K.
Guillemette, Michael A.
Browning, Christopher M.
Do Retirement Planning Strategies Alter the Effect of Time Preference on Retirement Wealth?
Applied Economics Letters 23,14 (2016): 1003-1005.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504851.2015.1128068
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Retirement; Savings; Time Preference; Wealth

An individual's willingness to accumulate retirement wealth is influenced by their preference for intertemporal consumption. People with a strong preference for current consumption (high personal discount rate) may choose to save less and face the risk of decreased retirement preparedness. A negative relation between a high personal discount rate and retirement wealth may be reduced when individuals engage in some form of retirement planning. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we provide evidence that respondents with a high personal discount rate accumulated 37% less retirement wealth, on average, between 2004 and 2008, when compared with respondents with a low personal discount rate. However, when retirement planning strategies were included in the model, there was no statistical difference in retirement wealth between people with high and low personal discount rates. The retirement planning strategies included calculating a retirement income need, hiring a financial planner for retirement or engaging in both of these activities.
Bibliography Citation
Martin, Terrance K., Michael A. Guillemette and Christopher M. Browning. "Do Retirement Planning Strategies Alter the Effect of Time Preference on Retirement Wealth?" Applied Economics Letters 23,14 (2016): 1003-1005.
11. Martin, Terrance K.
Guillemette, Michael A.
Urgel, Fabiola E.
The Effect of Disability Income on Retirement Decisions and Wealth
Applied Economics Letters 25,19 (2018): 1333-1335.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504851.2017.1420874
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Disability; Income; Retirement; Wealth

Using the 2008 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study examines the impact of receiving disability income on a respondent's decision to calculate a retirement income need, use tax-advantaged accounts and accumulate retirement wealth. Respondents who received disability income were 4.4% less likely to report calculating a retirement income need and 4.5% less likely to report using a tax-advantaged account, compared to a reference group of respondents who did not receive disability income. Respondents who received disability income also accumulated 41% less retirement wealth compared to the same reference group.
Bibliography Citation
Martin, Terrance K., Michael A. Guillemette and Fabiola E. Urgel. "The Effect of Disability Income on Retirement Decisions and Wealth." Applied Economics Letters 25,19 (2018): 1333-1335.
12. Mitra, Aparna
Effects of Physical Attributes on the Wages of Males And Females
Applied Economics Letters 8,11 (November 2001): 731-735.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504850110047605
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Height; Height, Height-Weight Ratios; Occupational Status; Physical Characteristics; Wages, Men; Wages, Women; Weight

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1993), this study analyses the effects of physical attributes, namely, height and weight, on the wages of males and females in professional and blue-collar occupations. A parallel theme of analysis is whether physical attributes have any impact on the wages of workers with high mathematics and computational skills. The results of this study show that among professionals and blue-collar workers, physical attributes significantly affect the wages of women and have no impact on the wages of men. Taller women enjoy wage premiums, while overweight women experience significant wage penalties. Another important finding is that among women with above average quantitative skills, the effects of physical attributes on wages are insignificant.
Bibliography Citation
Mitra, Aparna. "Effects of Physical Attributes on the Wages of Males And Females ." Applied Economics Letters 8,11 (November 2001): 731-735.
13. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Finney, Miles M.
Evidence on the Effect of Young Adults' Wages on their College Attendance Decisions
Applied Economics Letters 4,12 (December 1997): 733-735.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/758528717
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Employment, Youth; Wages, Youth

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this note demonstrates that the college attendance decision of employed young adults depends partly on their wage. We further find that the wage quadratically impacts the decision to attend college.
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan and Miles M. Finney. "Evidence on the Effect of Young Adults' Wages on their College Attendance Decisions." Applied Economics Letters 4,12 (December 1997): 733-735.
14. Nazarov, Zafar
Maternal Input Choices and Child Cognitive Development: Testing for Reverse Causality
Applied Economics Letters published online (16 March 2019): DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2019.1591588.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504851.2019.1591588
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Achievement; Child Care; Maternal Employment; Parental Investments; Parents, Single; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT)

I assess whether the results of child achievement tests affect maternal employment and the child-care choices of mothers with prekindergarten children. To test this hypothesis, I use a quasi-structural approach to form approximations to the mother's employment and child-care decision rules and jointly estimate them with the child cognitive development production function and wage equation. Using a sample of single mothers from the NLSY79, I find evidence that maternal employment and child-care decisions are sensitive to past achievement scores. In particular, a mother whose child has taken the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test before entering kindergarten and whose child's standardized test score is above a certain threshold intends to use childcare more and work more part-time hours immediately after observing the child's performance on the achievement test.
Bibliography Citation
Nazarov, Zafar. "Maternal Input Choices and Child Cognitive Development: Testing for Reverse Causality." Applied Economics Letters published online (16 March 2019): DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2019.1591588.
15. Renna, Francesco
Obesity History and Male Employment
Applied Economics Letters 22,2 (January 2015): 116-120.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504851.2014.929617#.VIiOQWNkfsk
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Employment; Male Sample; Modeling, Probit; Obesity

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, this article computes the stock of obesity as the number of obese years in the adult life of an individual. Then it estimates the effect of the stock of obesity on the probability of being employed. It is found that the accumulated years of morbid obesity (i.e. obesity associated with a body mass index above 40) has a large negative impact on employment status. This effect remains significant even after conditioning on time-invariant unobserved heterogeneity. The results of the IV probit analysis indicate that the stock of morbid obese years can be regarded as exogenous. Less severe levels of obesity do not seem to have an impact on employment.
Bibliography Citation
Renna, Francesco. "Obesity History and Male Employment." Applied Economics Letters 22,2 (January 2015): 116-120.