Search Results

Source: Annals of Epidemiology
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Deardorff, Julianna
Abrams, Barbara
Ekwaru, J. Paul
Rehkopf, David
Socioeconomic Status and Age at Menarche: An Examination of Multiple Indicators in an Ethnically Diverse Cohort
Annals of Epidemiology 24,10 (October 2014): 727-733.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1047279714003238
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Age at Menarche; Birthweight; Body Mass Index (BMI); Family Income; Family Resources; Life Course; Mothers and Daughters; Mothers, Age at Menarche; Obesity; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Weight

Purpose: Ethnic disparities exist in US girls' ages at menarche. Overweight and low socioeconomic status (SES) may contribute to these disparities but past research has been equivocal. We sought to determine which SES indicators were associated uniquely with menarche, for which ethnic groups, and whether associations operated through overweight.

Methods: Using National Longitudinal Study of Youth data, we examined associations between SES indicators and age at menarche. Participants were 4851 girls and their mothers. We used survival analyses to examine whether SES, at various time points, was associated with menarche, whether body mass index (BMI) mediated associations, and whether race/ethnicity modified associations.

Results: Black and Hispanic girls experienced menarche earlier than whites. After adjusting for SES, there was a 50% reduction in the effect estimate for "being Hispanic" and 40% reduction for "being Black" versus "being white" on menarche. SES indicators were associated uniquely with earlier menarche, including mother's unmarried status and lower family income. Associations varied by race/ethnicity. BMI did not mediate associations.

Conclusion: Racial differences in menarche may in large part be due to SES differences. Future experimental or quasi-experimental studies should examine whether intervening on SES factors could have benefits for delaying menarche among Blacks and Hispanics.

Bibliography Citation
Deardorff, Julianna, Barbara Abrams, J. Paul Ekwaru and David Rehkopf. "Socioeconomic Status and Age at Menarche: An Examination of Multiple Indicators in an Ethnically Diverse Cohort." Annals of Epidemiology 24,10 (October 2014): 727-733.
2. Faden, Vivian B.
Graubard, Barry I.
Alcohol Consumption During Pregnancy and Infant Birth Weight
Annals of Epidemiology 4,4 (July 1994): 279-284.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/1047279794900833
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Birthweight; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pre/post Natal Health Care; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Heavy maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy has been consistently linked to decreased infant birth weight but the effects of low and moderate levels of drinking on infant birth weight remain unclear. This study addresses the relationship of low to moderate alcohol consumption and birth weight in a nationally representative cohort sample (National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, n = 4409 births). Statistical methods that account for the complex sample design were used in the analysis. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression were used to adjust the relationship between drinking and birth weight for relevant covariates. Results of this study revealed a nonstatistically significant trend in the direction of greater numbers of low-birth-weight babies born to mothers who drank more frequently during pregnancy. A significant interaction between drinking and smoking was found in which the negative effects on birth weight of smoking were less for those women who drank more heavily (P = 0.046).
Bibliography Citation
Faden, Vivian B. and Barry I. Graubard. "Alcohol Consumption During Pregnancy and Infant Birth Weight." Annals of Epidemiology 4,4 (July 1994): 279-284.
3. Li, Chaoyang
Mayo, M.S.
Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.
Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy, Birth Weight, and Childhood Overweight: A Suppression Effect Model
Annals of Epidemiology 13,8 (September 2003): 569.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1047279703001637
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Body Mass Index (BMI); Breastfeeding; Child Health; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Hispanics; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Obesity; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

METHODS: Children aged 2 to 15 years (mean, 8.6 yrs; SD, 3.5 yrs) in 1996 born to mothers in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) were studied. The sample (n = 4,850) was 21.4% Hispanic, 29.9% Black, and 48.7% White. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from measured weight and height, and the BMI-for-age percentile was determined using the revised CDC growth charts. Children with BMI-for-age at or above 85th percentile were defined as overweight. The suppression effects were tested based on the framework proposed by Baron and Kenny (1986) using a series of multiple logistic regression models with SAS-callable SUDAAN program.

RESULTS: After adjusting for sex, ethnicity, gestational age, breastfeeding, mother's age, education, and alcohol use during pregnancy, maternal smoking during pregnancy was significantly associated with childhood overweight without adjusting for birth weight (model 1, total effect tau1 = 0.36, p = 0.006). Maternal smoking during pregnancy was significantly associated with reduced birth weight (model 2, alpha = - 0.21, p<0.0001). The direct effect of maternal smoking on childhood overweight with adjusting for birth weight was increased (model 3, direct effect tau2 = 0.42, p = 0.002). Birth weight was also significantly associated with childhood overweight (model 3, beta = 0.23, p = 0.03). The suppression effect (product of alpha and beta = -0.05, p = 0.04) of birth weight accounted for 14% of the total effects of maternal smoking on childhood overweight.

Bibliography Citation
Li, Chaoyang, M.S. Mayo and Jasjit S. Ahluwalia. "Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy, Birth Weight, and Childhood Overweight: A Suppression Effect Model." Annals of Epidemiology 13,8 (September 2003): 569.
4. Lyerly, Jordan E.
Huber, Larissa R. Brunner
The Role of Family Conflict on Risky Sexual Behavior in Adolescents Aged 15 to 21
Annals of Epidemiology 23,4 (April 2013): 233-235.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1047279713000203
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Contraception; Family Decision-making/Conflict; Family Environment; Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior

Data from 1104 adolescents aged 15 to 21 who completed the 2008 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were analyzed. Information on family conflict (family fighting and family criticizing) and sexual behavior (number of sexual partners in past year and use of contraception at last intercourse) was self-reported. Logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Bibliography Citation
Lyerly, Jordan E. and Larissa R. Brunner Huber. "The Role of Family Conflict on Risky Sexual Behavior in Adolescents Aged 15 to 21." Annals of Epidemiology 23,4 (April 2013): 233-235.
5. Margerison-Zilko, Claire E.
Economic Contraction and Maternal Health Behaviors During Pregnancy in a National Sample of U.S. Women
Annals of Epidemiology 24,6 (June 2014): 432-440.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1047279714000763
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Economic Changes/Recession; Pre/post Natal Behavior; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Unemployment Rate, Regional; Weight

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine associations between maternal exposure to unexpected economic contraction and health behaviors during pregnancy, using methods to account for impacts of economic contraction on selection into pregnancy.

Methods: Data on health behaviors among 7,074 pregnancies in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 were linked to monthly unemployment rates in maternal state of residence. The study examined associations between exposure to unexpected economic contraction (higher than expected state-level unemployment) during each trimester of pregnancy and maternal smoking, alcohol use, and gestational weight gain using generalized linear models.

Results: Economic contraction was not associated with maternal smoking or gestational weight gain. Associations between economic contraction and maternal alcohol use differed by maternal race/ethnicity and education. Among Black/non-Hispanic women, exposure to economic contraction during the first and second trimester of pregnancy were associated with a 42% (95% CI: 1.08, 1.85) and 33% (95% CI: 1.01, 1.74) increased risk of alcohol use, respectively.

Conclusions: Findings suggest that exposure to extreme economic contraction during pregnancy may be associated with increased use of alcohol with differences by maternal race/ethnicity and educational attainment. Economic contraction was not associated with other maternal pregnancy behaviors.

Bibliography Citation
Margerison-Zilko, Claire E. "Economic Contraction and Maternal Health Behaviors During Pregnancy in a National Sample of U.S. Women." Annals of Epidemiology 24,6 (June 2014): 432-440.
6. Rehkopf, David
Headen, Irene
Hubbard, Alan
Deardorff, Julianna
Kesavan, Yamini
Cohen, Alison K.
Patil, Divya
Ritchie, Lorrene
Abrams, Barbara
Adverse Childhood Experiences and Later Life Adult Obesity and Smoking in the United States
Annals of Epidemiology 26,7 (July 2016): 488-492.e5.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1047279716301600
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Childhood; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Household Influences; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Obesity; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Background: Prior work demonstrates associations between physical abuse, household alcohol abuse and household mental illness early in life with obesity and smoking. Studies, however, have not generally been in nationally representative samples and have not conducted analyses to account for bias in the exposure.

Methods: We used data from the 1979 U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to test associations between measures of adverse childhood experiences with obesity and smoking and used an instrumental variables approach to address potential measurement error of the exposure.

Results: Models demonstrated associations between childhood physical abuse and obesity at age 40 years (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.00-1.52) and ever smoking (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.56-2.16), as well as associations between household alcohol abuse (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.31-1.79) and household mental illness (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.60) with ever smoking. We find no evidence of association modification by gender, socioeconomic position or race/ethnicity. Instrumental variables analysis using a sibling's report of adverse childhood experiences demonstrated a relationship between household alcohol abuse and smoking, with a population attributable fraction of 17% (95% CI 2.0% to 37%) for ever smoking and 6.7% (95% CI 1.6% to 12%) for currently smoking.

Conclusions: Findings suggest long-term impacts of childhood exposure to physical abuse, household alcohol abuse and parental mental illness on obesity and smoking, and that the association between household alcohol abuse and smoking is not solely due to measurement error.

Bibliography Citation
Rehkopf, David, Irene Headen, Alan Hubbard, Julianna Deardorff, Yamini Kesavan, Alison K. Cohen, Divya Patil, Lorrene Ritchie and Barbara Abrams. "Adverse Childhood Experiences and Later Life Adult Obesity and Smoking in the United States." Annals of Epidemiology 26,7 (July 2016): 488-492.e5.
7. Vable, Anusha M.
Cohen, Alison K.
Leonard, Stephanie
Glymour, M. Maria
Duarte, Catherine
Yen, Irene H.
Do the Health Benefits of Education Vary by Sociodemographic Subgroup? Differential Returns to Education and Implications for Health Inequities
Annals of Epidemiology 28,11 (November 2018): 759-766.e5.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1047279718305209
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Socioeconomic Background

Methods: Using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (N=6,158) cohort data, we evaluate education attained by age 25 and mental (MCS) and physical (PCS) health component summary scores at age 50. Race/ethnicity, sex, geography, immigration status, and childhood socioeconomic status (cSES) were evaluated as effect modifiers in birth-year adjusted linear regression models.
Bibliography Citation
Vable, Anusha M., Alison K. Cohen, Stephanie Leonard, M. Maria Glymour, Catherine Duarte and Irene H. Yen. "Do the Health Benefits of Education Vary by Sociodemographic Subgroup? Differential Returns to Education and Implications for Health Inequities." Annals of Epidemiology 28,11 (November 2018): 759-766.e5.