Search Results

Source: American Educational Research Journal
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Gasper, Joseph Michael
Deluca, Stefanie
Estacion, Angela
Switching Schools: Revisiting the Relationship Between School Mobility and High School Dropout
American Educational Research Journal 49,3 (June 2012): 487-519.
Also: http://aer.sagepub.com/content/49/3/487
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Dropouts; Education; Mobility, Schools; Propensity Scores; School Dropouts; Schooling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Youth who switch schools are more likely to demonstrate a wide array of negative behavioral and educational outcomes, including dropping out of high school. However, whether switching schools actually puts youth at risk for dropout is uncertain, since youth who switch schools are similar to dropouts in their levels of prior school achievement and engagement, which suggests that switching schools may be part of the same long-term developmental process of disengagement that leads to dropping out. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this study uses propensity score matching to pair youth who switched high schools with similar youth who stayed in the same school. We find that while over half the association between switching schools and dropout is explained by observed characteristics prior to ninth grade, switching schools is still associated with dropout. Moreover, the relationship between switching schools and dropout varies depending on a youth’s propensity for switching schools.
Bibliography Citation
Gasper, Joseph Michael, Stefanie Deluca and Angela Estacion. "Switching Schools: Revisiting the Relationship Between School Mobility and High School Dropout." American Educational Research Journal 49,3 (June 2012): 487-519.
2. Heymann, S. Jody
Earle, Alison
Low-Income Parents: How Do Working Conditions Affect Their Opportunity to Help School-Age Children at Risk?
American Educational Research Journal 37,4 (Winter 2000): 833-848.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1163494
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Benefits; Children, Academic Development; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, School-Age; Income; Income Level; Maternal Employment; Parent-School involvement; Parental Influences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Numerous studies have documented the importance of parental involvement to children's success at school. Much of the discussion about what influences the outcomes of poor children has assumed that low-income parents have the same opportunity to help their children's education. Yet, parents' availability to be involved with their children's education is often determined by job benefits and working conditions. The goal of this article is to examine empirically whether low-income working parents face significantly different nonfinancial barriers to parental involvement than those faced by higher income working parents. In particular, we examine the working conditions faced by parents who have at least one child who is in need of help because of educational or behavioral problems. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth--Mother and Child Surveys (NLSY) on 1,878 families where mothers worked more than 20 hr per week were analyzed. Copyright 2000 by the American Educational Research Association.
Bibliography Citation
Heymann, S. Jody and Alison Earle. "Low-Income Parents: How Do Working Conditions Affect Their Opportunity to Help School-Age Children at Risk?" American Educational Research Journal 37,4 (Winter 2000): 833-848.
3. Kohen, Andrew I.
Nestel, Gilbert
Karmas, Constantine
Factors Affecting Individual Persistence Rates in Undergraduate College Programs
American Educational Research Journal 15,2 (Spring 1978): 233-252.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1162462
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): College Dropouts; College Enrollment; Employment; Marital Status; Scholarships; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study uses a sample drawn from the NLS of Young Men attending college in the l960s. Some of the principal conclusions of the multivariate analyses are: (1) factors determining persistence vary widely with the stage of the undergraduate career; (2) race and parental SES bear no net relation to dropping out; (3) the impact of ability declines with progress toward graduation; and (4) entering college in a two-year institution is inversely associated with persistence. These and other findings demonstrate that much previous research has perpetuated erroneous inferences about dropping out of college, not the least of which is that the process can be modeled in a single equation representing the likelihood of graduation by any given group of freshmen.
Bibliography Citation
Kohen, Andrew I., Gilbert Nestel and Constantine Karmas. "Factors Affecting Individual Persistence Rates in Undergraduate College Programs." American Educational Research Journal 15,2 (Spring 1978): 233-252.
4. Magnuson, Katherine A.
Duncan, Greg J.
Lee, Kenneth T. H.
Metzger, Molly
Early School Adjustment and Educational Attainment
American Educational Research Journal 53,4 (August 2016): 1198-1228.
Also: http://aer.sagepub.com/content/53/4/1198
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Attention/Attention Deficit; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Academic Development; Children, Adjustment Problems; Educational Attainment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although school attainment is a cumulative process combining mastery of both academic and behavioral skills, most studies have offered only a piecemeal view of the associations between middle-childhood capacities and subsequent schooling outcomes. Using a 20-year longitudinal data set, this study estimates the association between children's academic skills, antisocial behaviors, and attention problems--all averaged across middle childhood--and their long-term educational outcomes. After adjusting for family and individual background measures, we find that high average levels of math and reading achievement, and low average levels of antisocial behavior problems, are positively associated with later attainment. Associations between attention problems and attainment are small. Associations are attenuated somewhat when sibling differences in these skills and behaviors are related to sibling differences in attainment outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Magnuson, Katherine A., Greg J. Duncan, Kenneth T. H. Lee and Molly Metzger. "Early School Adjustment and Educational Attainment." American Educational Research Journal 53,4 (August 2016): 1198-1228.
5. Maralani, Vida
From GED to College: Age Trajectories of Nontraditional Educational Paths
American Educational Research Journal 48,5 (October 2011): 1058-1090.
Also: http://aer.sagepub.com/content/48/5/1058
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s):

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Age patterns of secondary certification and college entry differ in complex and surprising ways for traditional graduates and GED recipients. Although GED recipients are less likely to enter college in their late teens, they catch up to traditional graduates in their 20s. Results show that adjusting for differences in the age trajectories of school continuation accounts for a substantial portion of the differences observed between the two groups. Important differences remain, however, in the type of college attended and the likelihood of college entry before age 21. Nonetheless, more GED recipients enroll in college than previous studies have suggested, and this interest in college identifies a useful place for policy to intervene to encourage school continuation for this group.
Bibliography Citation
Maralani, Vida. "From GED to College: Age Trajectories of Nontraditional Educational Paths." American Educational Research Journal 48,5 (October 2011): 1058-1090.
6. Markowitz, Anna J.
Changes in School Engagement as a Function of No Child Left Behind: A Comparative Interrupted Time Series Analysis
American Educational Research Journal 55,4 (August 2018): 721-760.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.3102/0002831218755668
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Children, Academic Development; Educational Outcomes; Geocoded Data; Schooling; State-Level Data/Policy

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

After the adoption of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), a host of anecdotal evidence suggested that NCLB diminished students' school engagement--a multidimensional construct that describes students' active involvement and commitment to school and encompasses students' thoughts, behaviors, and feelings about school. Using data from repeated cross-sections of the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study draws on methodological innovations from research linking NCLB to academic outcomes to explore this possibility. Findings are suggestive of an immediate NCLB-based increase in engagement that diminished and ultimately became negative over time. Because engagement predicts both achievement and socio-emotional well-being, researchers and policymakers should work to ensure that the Every Student Succeeds Act facilitates accountability systems that promote engagement.
Bibliography Citation
Markowitz, Anna J. "Changes in School Engagement as a Function of No Child Left Behind: A Comparative Interrupted Time Series Analysis." American Educational Research Journal 55,4 (August 2018): 721-760.
7. Rumberger, Russell W.
Dropping Out of High School: The Influence of Race, Sex, and Family Background
American Educational Research Journal 20,2 (Summer 1983): 199-220.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1162594
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Educational Research Association
Keyword(s): Children; Dropouts; Family Background; High School; High School Dropouts; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the extent of the high school dropout problem in l979 and investigates both the stated reasons students leave school and some of the underlying factors influencing their decision. Particular attention is focused on differences by sex, race, and family background. Data for this research come from the NLSY, a national sample of youth who were 14 to 21 years of age in l979. A multivariate model is developed to estimate the effects of family background and other factors on the decision to drop out of school. Several results emerge from the study. The reasons students cite for leaving school vary widely, with women more likely to leave because of pregnancy or marriage and men more likely to leave to go to work. Family background strongly influences the propensity to drop out of school and accounts for virtually all of the racial differences in dropout rates. A variety of other factors, including ability and aspirations, also influence this decision.
Bibliography Citation
Rumberger, Russell W. "Dropping Out of High School: The Influence of Race, Sex, and Family Background." American Educational Research Journal 20,2 (Summer 1983): 199-220.