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Source: Aging and Work
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Daymont, Thomas N.
Andrisani, Paul J.
The Health and Economic Status of Very Early Retirees
Aging and Work 6,2 (1983): 117-135
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: National Council on the Aging
Keyword(s): Benefits, Disability; Early Retirement; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mortality; Pensions; Retirees; Retirement; Social Security

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study begins by reviewing key issues raised in the Kingson-Myers debate. Then, using Kingson's analysis as a point of departure, we compare the health and economic status of different groups of Very Early Retirees (VERs). Comparisons of mortality, functional and work limitations indicate that Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) recipients had somewhat more severe health problems and work limitations than unhealthy nonrecipients of SSDI. A substantial number of unhealthy nonrecipients of SSDI received other disability benefits or appeared to be ineligible for SSDI for reasons other than health. Unhealthy VERs who did not receive any disability benefits suffered somewhat greater economic hardship than did recipients of SSDI or other disability benefits. Group differences in health notwithstanding, the finding that a substantial proportion of nonrecipients with severe health problems experienced poverty indicates Kingson's concern that some unhealthy VERs may have been denied SSDI benefits unfairly is warranted. But the analysis also reveals that the social problem is not nearly as large as Kingson's analysis suggests, and a few SSDI recipients may not have deserved benefits.
Bibliography Citation
Daymont, Thomas N. and Paul J. Andrisani. "The Health and Economic Status of Very Early Retirees." Aging and Work 6,2 (1983): 117-135.
2. Kingson, Eric R.
Critique of Early Retirement Study Disputed
Aging and Work 5,2 (Spring 1982): 93-110
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: National Council on the Aging
Keyword(s): Benefits, Disability; Early Retirement; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mortality; Pensions; Retirement; Social Security

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article responds to a critique (Myers, l982) challenging the research findings published in Aging and Work (Kingson, l98l) that indicate a significant portion of men withdraw from the labor force before age 62 due to health problems, but without receiving disability benefits. The critique also argues that findings from the various studies showing poor health to be an important contributing factor to retirement before age 65 are not necessarily valid. The critique is rejected because: (l) it fails to recognize that conclusions published in the Aging and Work article are based on several health indicators--not simply mortality findings; (2) it fails to acknowledge that its central criticism--the possibility of a fallacy of aggregation which invalidates the mortality findings--was accounted for in the original analysis; and (3) the hypothetical model developed to illustrate the inconclusiveness of the findings is based on questionable and often unsubstantiated assumptions.
Bibliography Citation
Kingson, Eric R. "Critique of Early Retirement Study Disputed." Aging and Work 5,2 (Spring 1982): 93-110.
3. Kingson, Eric R.
The Retirement Circumstances of Very Early Retirees: A Life Cycle Perspective
Aging and Work 4,3 (Summer 1981): 161-174
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: National Council on the Aging
Keyword(s): Control; Duncan Index; Early Retirement; Educational Attainment; Household Income; Job Tenure; Life Cycle Research; Retirees; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A life cycle perspective is applied to an analysis of retirement incomes and control over labor force exit experienced by men who left work before age 62--very early retirees (VERs). Findings suggest events occurring early in a worker's life, and often beyond his control, influence retirement incomes and control over labor force withdrawal. They are consistent with an interpretation that institutional arrangements in society usually lead to differential opportunity tracks, resulting in some VERs experiencing favorable educational and labor force entry opportunities that later translate into higher probabilities of advantageous very early retirement circumstances, while others experience the opposite. Some major policy implications are: (1) preventive measures designed to deal with problems of disadvantaged very early retirees should intervene early in a worker's life; (2) significant solutions to these problems require major adjustments in society's opportunity structure; and (3) it is socially inequitable to reduce Social Security benefits for disadvantaged early retirees. In addition, the life cycle perspective may be useful to understand other aspects of the retirement process.
Bibliography Citation
Kingson, Eric R. "The Retirement Circumstances of Very Early Retirees: A Life Cycle Perspective." Aging and Work 4,3 (Summer 1981): 161-174.
4. Parnes, Herbert S.
Health, Pension Policy and Retirement
Aging and Work 6,2 (1983): 93-101
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: National Council on the Aging
Keyword(s): Earnings; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Pensions; Retirement; Self-Reporting

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Evidence from the NLS Older Men's cohort shows that self-reported health measures can be used with reasonable confidence to assess the role of health in the retirement decision. Retirement decisions are complex and are influenced by a number of economic and noneconomic factors, although it is not possible to estimate confidently their relative importance. These include health, attitude toward work in general, satisfaction with current job, and level of prospective retirement income.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S. "Health, Pension Policy and Retirement." Aging and Work 6,2 (1983): 93-101.