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Source: Academic Press
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Buchele, Robert
Sex Discrimination and Labor Market Segmentation
In: Dynamics of Labour Market Segmentation. F. Wilkinson, ed. New York, NY: Academic Press, 1981
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Blue-Collar Jobs; Discrimination; Discrimination, Job; Discrimination, Sex; Earnings; Job Tenure; Schooling; White Collar Jobs; Work Experience

Sex discrimination in employment and earnings is analyzed from a labor market segmentation perspective. This provides a useful framework because it focuses clearly on the two forms which discrimination may take: job discrimination (unequal access to certain classes of jobs) and pay discrimination (unequal pay in similar kinds of jobs).
Bibliography Citation
Buchele, Robert. "Sex Discrimination and Labor Market Segmentation" In: Dynamics of Labour Market Segmentation. F. Wilkinson, ed. New York, NY: Academic Press, 1981
2. Leigh, Duane E.
An Analysis of the Determinants of Occupational Upgrading
New York, NY: Academic Press, 1978
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Earnings; Employment; Human Capital Theory; Job Tenure; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Schooling; Vocational Education

The occupational mobility of individual workers is examined in attempting to test several hypotheses drawn from human capital theory and the dual labor market hypothesis. The tests involve a comparison of the occupational advancement of black and white males in similar age categories using two sources of longitudinal data. Census data allow the measurement of occupational change between l965 and l970, while change over the l966-69 period is examined using the NLS of Young Men. Results indicate that education and post-school investments in vocational training and job tenure have positive effects of roughly similar magnitudes on the upgrading of blacks and whites. Controlling for these personal endowments, the effect on upgrading of mobility between employers is also estimated.
Bibliography Citation
Leigh, Duane E. An Analysis of the Determinants of Occupational Upgrading. New York, NY: Academic Press, 1978.
3. Luke, Douglas A.
Multilevel Growth Curve Analysis for Quantitative Outcomes
In: Handbook of Longitudinal Research: Design, Measurement, and Analysis. S. Menard, ed., Burlington, MA: Academic Press, 2008: 545-564
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Body Mass Index (BMI); Drug Use; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Substance Use

Multilevel growth curve modeling is one of the most powerful and flexible ways to analyze longitudinal data.

For this chapter, data were extracted and downloaded from the complete seven-year NLSY97 public dataset. We will be focusing on developing growth models for two dependent variables: BMI and Total Substance Use Days.

[Extracted from chapter]

Bibliography Citation
Luke, Douglas A. "Multilevel Growth Curve Analysis for Quantitative Outcomes" In: Handbook of Longitudinal Research: Design, Measurement, and Analysis. S. Menard, ed., Burlington, MA: Academic Press, 2008: 545-564
4. Rosenberg, Sam
Occupational Mobility and Short Cycles
In: Dynamics of Labour Market Segmentation. F. Wilkinson, ed. New York, NY: Academic Press, 1981
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Business Cycles; Career Patterns; Duncan Index; Labor Market, Secondary; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Occupational Aspirations; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Work History

The author examined the impact of cyclical fluctuations, during l966-75, on the occupational experience of older male workers. Within a labor market segmentation framework, the questions analyzed were: (1) what is the extent of upward occupational mobility from the secondary sector to the primary sector in times of economic expansion; (2) what is the extent of downward occupational mobility from the primary sector to the secondary sector during economic downturns; (3) what is the degree of permanence of upward occupational mobility over the business cycle; and (4) what racial differentials exist in mobility patterns? The findings suggest that there is some upward mobility from the secondary sector to the primary sector during the expansion phase of the business cycle. However, many workers return to the secondary sector during economic slumps. The particular mobility patterns observed correlate to a degree with trends in labor demand, as measured by fluctuations in the size of different occupations over the business cycle, and the extent of unemployment in those occupations.
Bibliography Citation
Rosenberg, Sam. "Occupational Mobility and Short Cycles" In: Dynamics of Labour Market Segmentation. F. Wilkinson, ed. New York, NY: Academic Press, 1981