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Author: Zhang, Yang
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Zhang, Yang
Leaving Gets Easier as You Age: Effects of Cohabitation Dissolution on Mental Health by Age and Gender
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Cohabitation; Depression (see also CESD); Health, Mental; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines how age and gender moderate effects of cohabitation dissolution on mental health. Drawing on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), I applied growth curve models to analyze trajectories of depressive symptoms (N=4496) and binge drinking behaviors (N=4503) among young adults between age 20 to 36. Results indicate that cohabitation dissolution is negatively associated with the mental health of young adults, but this negative relationship weakens as individuals age. Prior experiences of cohabitation dissolution buffer the negative consequences of cohabitation dissolution and partially explain the moderating effects of age on the negative association between cohabitation dissolution and mental health. I find no gender differences in the associations between cohabitation dissolution with either depressive symptoms or binge drinking behaviors. Among the current cohorts of young adults, cohabitation dissolution is negatively related to mental health and this association is similar by gender but disparate over the life course.
Bibliography Citation
Zhang, Yang. "Leaving Gets Easier as You Age: Effects of Cohabitation Dissolution on Mental Health by Age and Gender." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
2. Zhang, Yang
Ang, Shannon
Trajectories of Union Transition in Emerging Adulthood: Socioeconomic Status and Race/Ethnicity Differences in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 Cohort
Journal of Marriage and Family 82,2 (April 2020): 713-732.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jomf.12662
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Cohabitation; Ethnic Differences; Marital History/Transitions; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the patterns of union transition in emerging adulthood for the 1980 to 1984 cohort and examine its associations with socioeconomic status and race/ethnicity.

Background: Research on diverging destinies of cohabitation and marriage tends to focus on singular transitions rather than entire individual trajectories composed of dimensions such as timing, order, duration, and number of transitions.

Method: Drawing on monthly prospective data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, social sequence analysis was used to classify union transition trajectories from ages 16 to 30. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the probability of membership in each cluster.

Results: The findings showed the following six key clusters of trajectories: mostly single (37.6%), some cohabiting (13.8%), serial cohabiting (10.6%), early 20s marriage (11.4%), late 20s marriage (22.5%), and turbulent (4.1%). We found that young adults were most likely to be in the "mostly single" cluster, regardless of socioeconomic status and race/ethnicity. Individuals with college degrees tended to marry in their late 20s, whereas individuals without college degrees were more likely to be in "serial cohabiting" and "turbulent" clusters. Individuals who lived with neither of their biological parents were more likely to belong to "early 20s marriage" and "turbulent" clusters when compared with those who lived with at least one of their biological parents. Blacks were more likely to remain single, whereas non‐Hispanic Whites were more likely to marry sometime in their 20s.

Bibliography Citation
Zhang, Yang and Shannon Ang. "Trajectories of Union Transition in Emerging Adulthood: Socioeconomic Status and Race/Ethnicity Differences in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 Cohort." Journal of Marriage and Family 82,2 (April 2020): 713-732.