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Author: Wells, Thomas Eric
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Hogan, Dennis P.
Wells, Thomas Eric
School to Work Transition for Adolescents with Disabilities
Presented: Minneapolis, MN, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2003
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Bayesian; Disability; Transition, School to Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97), we examine the early transition to adulthood among adolescents with disabilities. The NLSY97 provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the impact of schooling, family background, and community background factors on the transition to adulthood. The set of data also allows the researchers to compare the experience of adolescents with disabilities to the experiences of adolescents without disabilities. In our analysis, we utilize Bayesian model averaging (BMA), a recently developed methodological technique that identifies the best-fitting regression models and then averages results across these models. The results from the BMA procedure are arguably better than results derived from a single statistical model since they are averaged across a number of models. This is a very useful approach given uncertainty and variation in results that surround any one particular statistical model. We utilize the procedure for each transition considered.
Bibliography Citation
Hogan, Dennis P. and Thomas Eric Wells. "School to Work Transition for Adolescents with Disabilities." Presented: Minneapolis, MN, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2003.
2. Sandefur, Gary D.
Wells, Thomas Eric
Does Family Structure Really Influence Educational Attainment?
Social Science Research 28,4 (December 1999): 331-357.
Also: http://www.idealibrary.com/links/artid/ssre.1999.0648
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Family Characteristics; Family Influences; Family Structure; Siblings

This paper examines the effects of family structure on educational attainment after controlling for common family influences, observed and unobserved, using data from siblings. The use of sibling data permits us to examine whether the apparent effects of family structure are due to unmeasured characteristics of families that are common to siblings. The data come from pairs of siblings in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979-1992. The results suggest that taking into account the unmeasured family characteristics yields estimates of the effects of family structure on educational attainment that are smaller, but still statistically significant, than estimates based on analyses that do not take unmeasured family influences into account. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.
Bibliography Citation
Sandefur, Gary D. and Thomas Eric Wells. "Does Family Structure Really Influence Educational Attainment?" Social Science Research 28,4 (December 1999): 331-357.
3. Sandefur, Gary D.
Wells, Thomas Eric
Using Siblings to Investigate the Effects of Family Structure on Educational Attainment
Discussion Paper No. 1144-97, Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin - Madison, September 1997.
Also: http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp114497.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP), University of Wisconsin - Madison
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Family Influences; Family Structure; Income; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines the effects of family structure on educational attainment after controlling for common family influences, observed and unobserved, using data from siblings. The use of sibling data permits us to examine whether the apparent effects of family structure are due to unmeasured characteristics of families that are common to siblings. The data come from pairs of siblings in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979-1992. The results suggest that taking into account the unmeasured family characteristics yields estimates of the effects of family structure on educational attainment that are smaller, but still statistically significant, than estimates based on analyses that do not take unmeasured family influences into account.
Bibliography Citation
Sandefur, Gary D. and Thomas Eric Wells. "Using Siblings to Investigate the Effects of Family Structure on Educational Attainment." Discussion Paper No. 1144-97, Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin - Madison, September 1997.
4. Wells, Thomas Eric
Using the Two-Sided Logit Model to Elucidate the Determinants of Occupational Attainment
Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2000. DAI 61,12A (2000): 4958
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Cognitive Ability; Demography; Educational Attainment; Ethnic Studies; Family Background; Industrial Relations; Modeling, Logit; Racial Studies; Socioeconomic Background; Work Experience

This research project addresses the labor market process of matching people to jobs. Using John Allen Logan's two-sided logit model along with recent data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, I investigate the process by which workers get matched to jobs, paying attention to characteristics and preferences of both workers and employers.

The results from my analysis indicate that race/ethnicity, cognitive ability, educational attainment, and years of work experience are all salient factors in predicting the likelihood of receiving employment offers. In addition, the results indicate that hourly rate of pay is a salient factor in predicting the likelihood of accepting an employment offer in a particular occupational category.

However, the coefficients corresponding to the preferences of employers for characteristics of individuals are not shown to be uniform across the occupational distribution. Rather, they are shown to differ across the occupational categories, suggesting the existence of differential employer preferences and differential demands for certain types of labor across the occupational structure. Such findings and interpretations are consistent with common sense and are hardly surprising. However, status attainment and earnings attainment models are usually constructed in such a way that a single uniform labor market process is implicitly assumed to operate across the entire occupational structure. The results indicate that this is not the case.

I also consider the role that family background variables may play in predicting the likelihood of receiving offers of employment in various occupational categories. However, these variables are not shown to provide much additional explanatory power in terms of predicting occupational outcomes.

My findings seem to indicate that employers are primarily concerned with the characteristics of individuals. An individual's socioeconomic background is not extremely relevant to employersand to their hiring decisions, ostensibly because (unlike cognitive ability, educational attainment, and work experience) it has little bearing on an individual's capacity to perform a job. However, this is not to say that socioeconomic origins have no bearing on occupational outcomes. My findings also suggest that background variables may exert important indirect effects through the other variables included in the model.

Bibliography Citation
Wells, Thomas Eric. Using the Two-Sided Logit Model to Elucidate the Determinants of Occupational Attainment. Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2000. DAI 61,12A (2000): 4958.