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Author: Thomeer, Mieke
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Thomeer, Mieke
Reczek, Corinne
Coresidential Patterns by Parents' and Children's Health
Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Coresidence; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Residence, Return to Parental Home/Delayed Homeleaving

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Rates of coresidence between young adults and their parents have increased in recent years. Past studies have considered predictors of coresidence, including economic characteristics, demographic characteristics, and parental characteristics. Yet few studies consider the role of health, and specifically the interplay of parents' and adult children's health. In this study, we analyze the NLSY79-YA and NLSY79 (N=3,516) with hazard models to examine how the health of adult children, their mothers, and their fathers shapes risk of exiting parents' household as well as the risk of "boomeranging" back into the parental home. Results indicate that health outcomes operate in different ways; mothers' and children's worse mental health increase the risk of a child moving out, but mothers' health limitations decrease risk of moving out. Further, health operates differently for re-entry compared to exit-- for example, children's health is associated with risk of moving out but not risk of reentering parents' home.
Bibliography Citation
Thomeer, Mieke and Corinne Reczek. "Coresidential Patterns by Parents' and Children's Health." Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018.
2. Wolfe, Joseph D.
Thomeer, Mieke
Marital and Racial Disparities in Economic Resources and Survival Among Older Women
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Home Ownership; Marital Status; Mortality; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Married White women generally live longer than their divorced counterparts, but studies show little to no difference in married and divorced Black women's mortality risk. Many potential explanations for these patterns are related to the distribution of economic resources related to marital status and race. Nevertheless, research in this area has yet to consider the components of income and wealth. This study examines recently updated mortality information and economic records for women from the NLS-MW (N=4,687), a cohort that came into adulthood during a period of low divorce rates but profound gender- and race-based stratification. Results provide evidence that the low mortality risk of married White women is linked to their ownership of more valuable homes than Black women and divorced and never-married White women. Our findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing health disparities must first address the social causes of housing and other wealth-based inequali
Bibliography Citation
Wolfe, Joseph D. and Mieke Thomeer. "Marital and Racial Disparities in Economic Resources and Survival Among Older Women." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.