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Author: Tan, Kevin
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Heath, Ryan D.
Tan, Kevin
Guzzy, Jennifer S.
Henry, Briyana
Patterns of School Victimization and Problem Behaviors: Longitudinal Associations with Socioeconomic Well-Being and Criminal Justice Involvement
Child and Youth Care Forum published online (21 June 2021): DOI: 10.1007/s10566-021-09633-1.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10566-021-09633-1
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Bullying/Victimization; Criminal Justice System; Gender Differences; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: Drawing on general strain theory, this study aimed to identify sex-specific profiles of victimization and problem behaviors during middle school, and their association with socioeconomic, violence, and criminal justice outcomes in young adulthood.

Method: Latent class analyses was conducted on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth-1997, including subsamples of seventh grade females (n = 529) and males (n = 494).

Results: Two classes were identified for females: (1) low-risk and (2) high-risk; these classes were associated with outcomes in the hypothesized directions. For males, however, there were three groups: (1) low-risk, which reported low rates of victimization and problem behaviors; (2) victimized, with high victimization but low rates of problem behaviors; and (3) high-risk, with high rates of both victimization and problem behaviors. Interestingly, victimized males had socioeconomic and criminal justice outcomes similar to low-risk males, but rates of assault comparable to high-risk males. For example, victimized males were five times more likely to obtain a college degree than high-risk males (27.1% versus 4.6%) and three times less likely to live in poverty (9.5% versus 25.9%), but only slightly less likely to commit assault (41.7% versus 59.8%). However, there was alarming over-representation of Black youth in the high-risk groups.

Bibliography Citation
Heath, Ryan D., Kevin Tan, Jennifer S. Guzzy and Briyana Henry. "Patterns of School Victimization and Problem Behaviors: Longitudinal Associations with Socioeconomic Well-Being and Criminal Justice Involvement." Child and Youth Care Forum published online (21 June 2021): DOI: 10.1007/s10566-021-09633-1.
2. Tan, Kevin
Heath, Ryan D.
Das, Aditi
Choi, Yoonsun
Gender Differences in Patterns of School Victimization and Problem Behaviors During Middle School and Their Relation to High School Graduation
Youth and Society 51,3 (April 2019): 339-357.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0044118X17741143
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Bullying/Victimization; Gender Differences; High School Completion/Graduates

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Victimization and problem behaviors during middle school detrimentally influence student learning. However, less is known about how they may cooccur and collectively affect high school graduation and whether the interrelationships vary by gender. Using data from a nationally representative cohort of seventh-grade students from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997; N = 1,009), latent class analyses identified three groups among boys and two among girls. Results indicated that 50% of boys in the high-risk group (high victimization and problem behaviors) did not graduate from high school on time. Furthermore, boys in the moderate-risk group (high victimization, low problem behaviors) graduated from high school on time at a rate comparable with the low-risk boys. Two groups emerged for girls (i.e., low vs. high risk) in which each corresponds to graduation in an expected direction. Findings from this study underscore the importance of gender differences in intervention efforts, especially during middle school.
Bibliography Citation
Tan, Kevin, Ryan D. Heath, Aditi Das and Yoonsun Choi. "Gender Differences in Patterns of School Victimization and Problem Behaviors During Middle School and Their Relation to High School Graduation." Youth and Society 51,3 (April 2019): 339-357.