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Author: Shin, Donggyun
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Park, Seonyoung
Shin, Donggyun
Explaining Procyclical Male-Female Wage Gaps
Economics Letters 88,2 (August 2005): 231-235.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176505001126
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Occupational Choice; Occupations; Wages; Work Hours

Our analysis based on the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for the 1978-1999 period concludes that men's greater representation in cyclical occupational groups, such as craftsmen, operatives, and laborers, more than accounts for the gap between men and women in the cyclicality of real wages. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Park, Seonyoung and Donggyun Shin. "Explaining Procyclical Male-Female Wage Gaps." Economics Letters 88,2 (August 2005): 231-235.
2. Shin, Donggyun
Cyclicality of Real Wages Among Young Men
Economics Letters 46,2 (October 1994): 137-142.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0165176594900086
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Job Tenure; Job Turnover; Labor Economics; Schooling; Skills; Training; Wage Differentials; Wage Levels; Wages

This paper analyzes the cyclical behavior of real wages received by the young men in the National Longitudinal Surveys of labor market experience. It extends the studies by Bils (Journal of Political Economy, 1985, 93, 666- 689) and Tremblay (Quarterly Review of Economics and Business, 1990, 30, 90-101) by using the full duration of the survey and by examining differences in wage cyclicality across industries and between workers that change employers and those that stay with the same employer.
Bibliography Citation
Shin, Donggyun. "Cyclicality of Real Wages Among Young Men." Economics Letters 46,2 (October 1994): 137-142.
3. Shin, Donggyun
Recent Trends in Men's Earnings Volatility: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1985-2009
B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 12,2 (October 2012): .
Also: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bejeap.2012.12.issue-2/1935-1682.3339/1935-1682.3339.xml?format=INT
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG
Keyword(s): Earnings; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Evidence on recent trends in men’s earnings volatility from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) has been found to be at odds with evidence from some other sources. This study adds evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, which turns out to be more consistent with the PSID.
Bibliography Citation
Shin, Donggyun. "Recent Trends in Men's Earnings Volatility: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1985-2009." B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy 12,2 (October 2012): .
4. Shin, Donggyun
Shin, Kwanho
Park, Seonyoung
Are Initial Wage Losses of Intersectoral Movers Compensated for by Their Subsequent Wage Gains?
Macroeconomic Dynamics 14,4 (September 2010): 501-526.
Also: http://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:14:y:2010:i:04:p:501-526_09
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Mobility; Mobility, Labor Market; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Unemployment; Wage Differentials; Wage Growth; Wage Levels

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper presents an equilibrium explanation of the inter- and intrasectoral mobility of workers. Analyses of our samples from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth show that, other things being equal, the initial wage decline is greater for intersectoral movers than for intrasectoral movers. Intersectoral movers, however, enjoy higher wage growth in subsequent years on postunemployment jobs than intrasectoral movers do, and hence are compensated for their initial wage decline. Our estimates suggest that, other things being constant, the additional short-term wage loss associated with sector shifts is overturned in no more than four years by the greater wage growth of intersectoral movers in subsequent years. The findings in the current study clearly show that the true economic costs of intersector mobility tend to be overstated in existing studies and are significantly lowered in the long-term perspective. Calibration of a simple lifetime utility model demonstrates that inter- and intrasectoral movements of workers are quantitatively consistent with an equilibrium framework, at least for a major group of workers who move with longer term perspectives. Evidence also shows that job seekers consider not only the initial wage rate but also the subsequent wages received from the postunemployment job when deciding whether to recommence employment or switch sectors.
Bibliography Citation
Shin, Donggyun, Kwanho Shin and Seonyoung Park. "Are Initial Wage Losses of Intersectoral Movers Compensated for by Their Subsequent Wage Gains?" Macroeconomic Dynamics 14,4 (September 2010): 501-526.
5. Shin, Donggyun
Solon, Gary
New Evidence on Real Wage Cyclicality within Employer-Employee Matches
NBER Working Papers No. w12262, National Bureau of Economic Research, 2006.
Also: http://www.nber.org/papers/w12262.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Wage Dynamics; Wages

In the most thorough study to date on wage cyclicality among job stayers, Devereux's (2001) analysis of men in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics produced two puzzling findings: (1) the real wages of salaried workers are noncyclical, and (2) wage cyclicality among hourly workers differs between two alternative wage measures. We examine these puzzles with additional evidence from other sources. Devereux's finding of noncyclical real wages among salaried job stayers is not replicated in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data. The NLSY data, however, do corroborate his finding of a discrepancy for hourly workers between the cyclicality of the two alternative wage measures. Evidence from the PSID Validation Study contradicts Devereux's conjecture that the discrepancy might be due to a procyclical bias from measurement error in average hourly earnings. Evidence from the Bureau of Labor Statistics establishment survey supports his hypothesis that overtime work accounts for part (but not all) of the discrepancy. We conclude that job stayers' real average hourly earnings are substantially procyclical and that an important portion of that procyclicality probably is due to compensation beyond base wages.
Bibliography Citation
Shin, Donggyun and Gary Solon. "New Evidence on Real Wage Cyclicality within Employer-Employee Matches." NBER Working Papers No. w12262, National Bureau of Economic Research, 2006.
6. Shin, Donggyun
Solon, Gary
New Evidence on Real Wage Cyclicality within Employer-Employee Matches
Scottish Journal of Political Economy 54,5 (November 2007): 648-660.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9485.2007.00434.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Employment; Income Distribution; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Unemployment; Wage Differentials; Wage Equations; Wage Levels; Wages

In the most thorough study to date on wage cyclicality among job stayers, Devereux's (2001) analysis of men in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) produced two puzzling findings: (1) the real wages of salaried workers are noncyclical, and (2) wage cyclicality among hourly workers differs between two alternative wage measures. We examine these puzzles with additional evidence from other sources. Devereux's finding of noncyclical real wages among salaried job stayers is not replicated in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) data. The NLSY data, however, do corroborate his finding of a discrepancy for hourly workers between the cyclicality of the two alternative wage measures. Evidence from the PSID Validation Study contradicts Devereux's conjecture that the discrepancy might be due to a procyclical bias from measurement error in average hourly earnings. Evidence from the Bureau of Labor Statistics establishment survey supports his hypothesis that overtime work accounts for part (but not all) of the discrepancy. We conclude that job stayers' real average hourly earnings are substantially procyclical and that an important portion of that procyclicality probably is due to compensation beyond base wages.
Bibliography Citation
Shin, Donggyun and Gary Solon. "New Evidence on Real Wage Cyclicality within Employer-Employee Matches." Scottish Journal of Political Economy 54,5 (November 2007): 648-660.