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Author: Schneider, Daniel J.
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Schneider, Daniel J.
Wealth and the Marital Divide
Working Paper, Office of Population Research, Princeton University, March 22nd, 2010.
Also: http://www.princeton.edu/~djschnei/wealthdivide_032210.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Office of Population Research, Princeton University
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Assets; Educational Status; Gender Differences; Marriage; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Marriage patterns differ dramatically in the United States by race and education. The author identifies a novel explanation for these marital divides; namely, the important role of personal wealth in marriage entry. Using event history models and data from the NLSY-79 cohort, the author shows that wealth is an important predictor of first marriage and that differences in asset ownership by race and education help to explain a significant portion of the race and education gaps in first marriage. The paper also tests possible explanations for why wealth plays an important role in first marriage entry and presents evidence that wealth is primarily important because of its symbolic value.

(Previously circulated and presented as "Norms and Nuptials: The Changing Social Price of Marriage.")
Presentations:
Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP), Annual Meeting. August 2009.
Population Association of America (PAA), Annual Meeting. April 2009.
Eastern Sociological Society (ESS), Annual Meeting. March 2009.
Princeton University, Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Workshop. September 2008.

Bibliography Citation
Schneider, Daniel J. "Wealth and the Marital Divide." Working Paper, Office of Population Research, Princeton University, March 22nd, 2010.
2. Schneider, Daniel J.
Wealth and the Marital Divide
American Journal of Sociology 117,2 (September 2011): 627-667.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/661594
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Assets; Educational Status; Gender Differences; Marriage; Racial Differences; Wealth

Marriage patterns differ dramatically in the United States by race and education. The author identifies a novel explanation for these marital divides, namely, the important role of personal wealth in marriage entry. Using event-history models and data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort, the author shows that wealth is an important predictor of first marriage and that differences in asset ownership by race and education help to explain a significant portion of the race and education gaps in first marriage. The article also tests possible explanations for why wealth plays an important role in first marriage entry.
Bibliography Citation
Schneider, Daniel J. "Wealth and the Marital Divide." American Journal of Sociology 117,2 (September 2011): 627-667.
3. Schneider, Daniel J.
Wealth and the Propensity to Marry
Ph.D. Dissertation, Princeton University, September 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Assets; Gender Differences; Marital Status; Marriage; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This dissertation takes a comprehensive and multidimensional approach to examining the link between wealth and the transition to marriage. In the first empirical chapter, I use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - 1979 to model the relationship between the ownership of key personal assets and transition to first marriage. I find that ownership of a car and financial assets for men and a car and other assets for women is positively related to entry into first marriages and that accounting for gaps in wealth ownership by race and education explains a portion of the marital divides along those same axes of differentiation. The second empirical chapter draws on data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to model the relationship between wealth and marriage in the contemporary period for a sample of disadvantaged parents who were unmarried at the birth of their children. I find additional evidence of a link between asset ownership and marriage entry. However, I find little evidence that asset ownership is related to entry into cohabitation or that access to other economic resources can take the place of assets for marriage. In the final empirical chapter, I use a novel data source to assess how wealth losses during the Great Recession may have impacted plans to marry and find evidence that men and women who have lost wealth are more likely to plan to delay marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Schneider, Daniel J. Wealth and the Propensity to Marry. Ph.D. Dissertation, Princeton University, September 2012.
4. Schneider, Daniel J.
Harknett, Kristen S.
What's to Like? Facebook as a Tool for Survey Data Collection
Sociological Methods and Research published online (14 November 2019): DOI: 10.1177/0049124119882477.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0049124119882477
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Comparison Group (Reference group); Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Data Quality/Consistency; Job Tenure; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this article, we explore the use of Facebook targeted advertisements for the collection of survey data. We illustrate the potential of survey sampling and recruitment on Facebook through the example of building a large employee-employer linked data set as part of The Shift Project. We describe the workflow process of targeting, creating, and purchasing survey recruitment advertisements on Facebook. We address concerns about sample selectivity and apply poststratification weighting techniques to adjust for differences between our sample and that of "gold standard" data sources. We then compare univariate and multivariate relationships in the Shift data against the Current Population Survey and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Finally, we provide an example of the utility of the firm-level nature of the data by showing how firm-level gender composition is related to wages. We conclude by discussing some important remaining limitations of the Facebook approach, as well as highlighting some unique strengths of the Facebook targeted advertisement approach, including the ability for rapid data collection in response to research opportunities, rich and flexible sample targeting capabilities, and low cost, and we suggest broader applications of this technique.
Bibliography Citation
Schneider, Daniel J. and Kristen S. Harknett. "What's to Like? Facebook as a Tool for Survey Data Collection." Sociological Methods and Research published online (14 November 2019): DOI: 10.1177/0049124119882477.
5. Schneider, Daniel J.
Harknett, Kristen S.
Stimpson, Matthew
Job Quality and the Educational Gradient in Entry into Marriage and Cohabitation
Working Paper Series, Washington Center for Equitable Growth, November 27, 2018.
Also: https://equitablegrowth.org/working-papers/job-quality-and-the-educational- gradient-in-entry-into-marriage-and-cohabitation/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Washington Center for Equitable Growth
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Cohabitation; Educational Attainment; Job Characteristics; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Men's and women's economic resources are important determinants of marriage timing. Prior demographic and sociological literature has often measured resources in narrow terms, considering employment and earnings and not more fine-grained measures of job quality. Yet, scholarship on work and inequality focuses squarely on declining job quality and rising precarity in employment and suggests that this transformation may matter for the life course. Addressing the disconnect between these two important areas of research, this paper analyzes data on the 1980-1984 U.S. birth cohort from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to examine the relationships between men's and women's economic circumstances and their entry into marital or cohabiting unions. We advance existing literature by moving beyond basic measures of employment and earnings and investigating how detailed measures of job quality matter for union formation. We find that men and women in less precarious jobs -- jobs with standard work schedules and jobs that provide fringe benefits -- are more likely to marry. Further, differences in job quality explain a significant portion of the educational gradient in entry into first marriage. However, these dimensions of job quality are not predictive of cohabitation.
Bibliography Citation
Schneider, Daniel J., Kristen S. Harknett and Matthew Stimpson. "Job Quality and the Educational Gradient in Entry into Marriage and Cohabitation." Working Paper Series, Washington Center for Equitable Growth, November 27, 2018.
6. Schneider, Daniel J.
Harknett, Kristen S.
Stimpson, Matthew
Job Quality and the Educational Gradient in Entry Into Marriage and Cohabitation
Demography 56,2 (April 2019): 451-476.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13524-018-0749-5
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Cohabitation; Educational Attainment; Job Characteristics; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Men's and women's economic resources are important determinants of marriage timing. Prior demographic and sociological literature has often measured resources in narrow terms, considering employment and earnings and not more fine-grained measures of job quality. Yet, scholarship on work and inequality focuses squarely on declining job quality and rising precarity in employment and suggests that this transformation may matter for the life course. Addressing the disconnect between these two important areas of research, this study analyzes data on the 1980-1984 U.S. birth cohort from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to examine the relationships between men's and women's job quality and their entry into marital or cohabiting unions. We advance existing literature by moving beyond basic measures of employment and earnings and investigating how detailed measures of job quality matter for union formation. We find that men and women in less precarious jobs--both jobs with standard work schedules and those that provide fringe benefits--are more likely to marry. Further, differences in job quality explain a significant portion of the educational gradient in entry into first marriage. However, these dimensions of job quality are not predictive of cohabitation.
Bibliography Citation
Schneider, Daniel J., Kristen S. Harknett and Matthew Stimpson. "Job Quality and the Educational Gradient in Entry Into Marriage and Cohabitation." Demography 56,2 (April 2019): 451-476.
7. Schneider, Daniel J.
Reich, Adam
Marrying Ain't Hard When You Got a Union Card? Labor Union Membership and First Marriage
Social Problems 61,4 (November 2014): 625-643.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/sp.2014.12316
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of California Press
Keyword(s): Employment; Income; Marriage; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Unions

Over the past five decades, marriage has changed dramatically, as young people began marrying later or never getting married at all. Scholars have shown how this decline is less a result of changing cultural definitions of marriage, and more a result of men's changing access to historically consistent social and economic pre-requisites for marriage. Specifically, men's current economic standing and men's future economic security have been shown to affect their marriageability. Traditionally, labor unions provided economic standing and security to male workers. Yet during the same period that marriage has declined among young people, membership in labor unions has declined precipitously--particularly for men. In this paper we examine the relationship between union membership and first marriage and discuss the possible mechanisms by which union membership might lead to first marriage. We draw on longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-79 to estimate discrete time event-history models of first marriage entry and find that, controlling for many factors, union membership is positively and significantly associated with marriage. We show then that this relationship is largely explained by the increased income, regularity and stability of employment, and fringe benefits that come with union membership.
Bibliography Citation
Schneider, Daniel J. and Adam Reich. "Marrying Ain't Hard When You Got a Union Card? Labor Union Membership and First Marriage." Social Problems 61,4 (November 2014): 625-643.
8. Stimpson, Matthew
Schneider, Daniel J.
Harknett, Kristen S.
Precarious Employment and Entry into Marriage and Cohabitation
Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Benefits, Fringe; Cohabitation; Employment, Intermittent; Job Characteristics; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Men's and women's economic resources are important determinants of marriage timing. However, these resources have been measured in very narrow terms in the prior demographic and sociological literature, which generally only considers employment and earnings and does not incorporate more fine-grained measures of job precarity. And yet, scholarship on work and inequality focuses exactly on rising precarity in employment and suggests that this transformation may matter for the lifecourse. There is a notable disconnect then between these two important areas of research. In this paper, we analyze data on a nationally representative sample of the 1980-1984 U.S. birth cohort from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and examine the relationships between men's and women's economic circumstances and their entry into marital or cohabiting unions. We advance existing literature by moving beyond basic measures of employment and earnings to investigate how detailed measures of job quality matter for union formation. We find that men and women in less precarious jobs -- as measured by fringe benefits, compensation structures, and work schedules -- are more likely to marry. Further, differences in job precarity explain a portion of the educational gradient in entry into first marriage. We find that both men's and women's job quality matters for marriage entry. However, poor job quality is much less of a barrier to cohabitation than it is to marriage. Similar paper also presented Chicago IL, APPAM Fall Research Meeting, November 2017.
Bibliography Citation
Stimpson, Matthew, Daniel J. Schneider and Kristen S. Harknett. "Precarious Employment and Entry into Marriage and Cohabitation." Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017.