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Author: Schafer, Markus H.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Shippee, Tetyana P.
Wilkinson, Lindsay R.
Schafer, Markus H.
Shippee, Nathan
Long-Term Effects of Age Discrimination on Mental Health: The Role of Perceived Financial Strain
Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 16,3 (September 2018): 629-659.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-017-9371-3
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Discrimination, Age; Discrimination, Job; Family Income; Life Satisfaction; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis

Methods: Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women (1967–2003), we employ nested growth curve models to evaluate whether perceived age discrimination at work influences women's depressive symptoms and life satisfaction and whether perceived financial strain mediates this relationship.

Results: Women who experienced age discrimination had greater overall depressive symptoms but not after controlling for financial strain. We found evidence that age discrimination affected financial strain, which, in turn, increased women's depressive symptoms. Women who reported age discrimination had lower odds of being in higher categories of overall life satisfaction; financial strain partially mediated the relationship but age discrimination remained a significant predictor.

Bibliography Citation
Shippee, Tetyana P., Lindsay R. Wilkinson, Markus H. Schafer and Nathan Shippee. "Long-Term Effects of Age Discrimination on Mental Health: The Role of Perceived Financial Strain." Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 16,3 (September 2018): 629-659.
2. Upenieks, Laura
Schafer, Markus H.
Religious Attendance and Physical Health in Later Life: A Life Course Approach
Journal of Health and Social Behavior published online (13 October 2020): DOI: 10.1177/0022146520961363.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022146520961363
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Parental Influences; Religious Influences; Smoking (see Cigarette Use)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Existing research on the life course origins of adult health has extensively examined the influence of childhood socioeconomic conditions, family structure, and exposure to trauma. Left unexplored are the potential long-term health effects of sociocultural exposures, such as religiosity at earlier phases of the life course. Integrating life course models of health with literature on the health-protective effects of adult religiosity, we consider how adolescent and midlife religiosity combine to structure the physical health profiles of adults past age 50. Using more than 35 years of representative data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 (NLSY79), we found that the stability of frequent religious practice over time was associated with better health composite scores and lower disease burden. Causal mediation analyses revealed that part of this association is driven by a lower risk of smoking for consistent, frequent attenders. Adulthood religiosity also mediated the relationship between frequent early-life religious attendance and health.
Bibliography Citation
Upenieks, Laura and Markus H. Schafer. "Religious Attendance and Physical Health in Later Life: A Life Course Approach." Journal of Health and Social Behavior published online (13 October 2020): DOI: 10.1177/0022146520961363.