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Author: Roksa, Josipa
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Roksa, Josipa
Differentiation and Work: Inequality in Degree Attainment in U.S. Higher Education
Higher Education 61,3 (March 2011): 293-308.
Also: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/klu/high/2011/00000061/00000003/00009378
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Differentiation; Education; Educational Attainment; Employment; Employment, In-School; Family Background; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Studies, Geographic

While much stratification research has focused on understanding the patterns and consequences of differentiation, previous studies have not considered similarly important variation in students' trajectories through higher education, and particularly their participation in the labor market. Results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth of 1997 (NLSY97) indicate that degree completion in a differentiated system of higher education is related to students' employment patterns. Students who begin their educational journeys in community colleges as well as students from less advantaged family backgrounds are more likely to dedicate longer hours to paid employment, which has negative consequences for degree attainment. Employment patterns contribute to gaps in degree completion among students from different family backgrounds and to a lesser extent to inequality in degree completion between students beginning postsecondary education in community colleges vs. 4-year institutions. A more complex set of patterns is revealed when examining the relationship between employment, family background, and degree attainment across different institutional types and educational credentials. These findings highlight the importance of developing a more comprehensive understanding of inequality in educational attainment by considering the relationship between differentiation and work. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Higher Education is the property of Springer Science & Business Media B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Roksa, Josipa. "Differentiation and Work: Inequality in Degree Attainment in U.S. Higher Education." Higher Education 61,3 (March 2011): 293-308.
2. Roksa, Josipa
Levey, Tania Gabrielle
What Can You Do with That Degree? College Major and Occupational Status of College Graduates over Time
Social Forces 89,2 (December 2010): 389-415.
Also: http://sf.oxfordjournals.org/content/89/2/389.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): College Degree; College Graduates; College Major/Field of Study/Courses; Occupational Attainment; Occupational Status; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While Income inequality among college graduates is well documented, inequality in occupational status remains largely unexplored. We examine whether and how occupational specificity of college majors is related to college graduates' transition into the labor market and their subsequent occupational trajectories. Analyses of NLSY79 indicate that occupationally specific degrees are beneficial at the point of entry into the labor market but have the lowest growth in occupational status over time. Students earning credentials focusing on general skills, in contrast, begin in jobs with low occupational status but subsequently report the greatest growth. These findings illuminate specific ways in which educational and occupational systems interact and provide a novel approach for understanding inequality in labor market outcomes among college graduates.
Bibliography Citation
Roksa, Josipa and Tania Gabrielle Levey. "What Can You Do with That Degree? College Major and Occupational Status of College Graduates over Time." Social Forces 89,2 (December 2010): 389-415.
3. Roksa, Josipa
Velez, Melissa
A Late Start: Delayed Entry, Life Course Transitions and Bachelor's Degree Completion
Social Forces 90,3 (2012): 769-794.
Also: http://sf.oxfordjournals.org/content/90/3/769
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): College Degree; College Enrollment; Educational Attainment; Higher Education; Life Course

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

While a substantial proportion of students delay entry into higher education, sociologists are only beginning to understand the consequences of this phenomenon for educational attainment. Previous studies have reported a negative relationship between delayed entry and degree completion, but they have not been able to explain it with a range of students' background characteristics. Results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth of 1997 indicate that life course transitions, including work, marriage/cohabitation and parenthood, make a unique contribution to explaining this relationship. Adding life course transitions to the models that already control for a range of background characteristics helps to explain the negative relationship between delayed entry and degree completion. These findings have implications for studying educational success in higher education and understanding the process of educational attainment more broadly.
Bibliography Citation
Roksa, Josipa and Melissa Velez. "A Late Start: Delayed Entry, Life Course Transitions and Bachelor's Degree Completion." Social Forces 90,3 (2012): 769-794.
4. Roksa, Josipa
Velez, Melissa
When Studying Schooling Is Not Enough: Incorporating Employment in Models of Educational Transitions
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 28,1 (March 2010): 5-21.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0276562409000146
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Education; Family Characteristics; Labor Force Participation; Socioeconomic Background; Transition, School to Work

Several recent studies have demonstrated the importance of incorporating qualitative differentiation within educational systems in the study of class inequality in student transitions. We extend these endeavors by broadening the definition of differentiation to include participation in the labor market. As increasing proportions of students continue their educational journeys beyond compulsory schooling, they are considering not only whether to stay in school but also whether to simultaneously enter the world of work. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth of 1997 (NLSY97), we show that family background influences not only whether students make specific educational transitions but also whether they combine those educational transitions with work. Student trajectories are also path dependent, with employment during one educational transition being related to specific transition patterns at a later point in time. Considering how students combine school and work reveals another dimension of differentiation which can be exploited by socioeconomically advantaged families to "effectively maintain" inequality in educational outcomes. (c) 2009 International Sociological Association Research Committee 28 on Social Stratification and Mobility. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Research in Social Stratification & Mobility is the property of JAI Press, Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Roksa, Josipa and Melissa Velez. "When Studying Schooling Is Not Enough: Incorporating Employment in Models of Educational Transitions." Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 28,1 (March 2010): 5-21.
5. Weiss, Felix
Roksa, Josipa
New Dimensions of Educational Inequality: Changing Patterns of Combining College and Work in the U.S. over Time
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 44 (June 2016): 44-53.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0276562416300117
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Education; Employment, In-School; Higher Education; Mobility, Social; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Expansion of an educational system is often accompanied by differentiation. In the U.S., expansion of higher education included an increasing reliance on work. For a growing proportion of students, including those of traditional college-going age, going to college also involved going to work. This raises a crucial question of whether this form of differentiation has altered the patterns of inequality in higher education. While growing proportions of disadvantaged students are entering higher education, are they increasingly depending on work during their studies? We address this question using data from two waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79 and NLSY97). We begin by presenting longitudinal profiles of engagement in school and work for young adults in the 1980s and 2000s. Following, we conduct multivariate analyses predicting the number of hours students are working while enrolled in college in two time periods. Presented analyses reveal a substantial amount of stability in social class inequality over time, with a modest increase in inequality among students attending four-year institutions full-time. Implications of these findings for policy and research on social stratification are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Weiss, Felix and Josipa Roksa. "New Dimensions of Educational Inequality: Changing Patterns of Combining College and Work in the U.S. over Time." Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 44 (June 2016): 44-53.