Search Results

Author: Rippeyoung, Phyllis L. F.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Rippeyoung, Phyllis L. F.
Noonan, Mary Christine
Is Breastfeeding Truly Cost Free? Income Consequences of Breastfeeding for Women
American Sociological Review 77,2 (April 2012): 244-267.
Also: http://asr.sagepub.com/content/77/2/244
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Breastfeeding; Earnings; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Random Effects; Mothers, Income; Wage Determination; Wage Effects; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Based on studies showing health advantages for breastfeeding mothers and their infants, pediatricians and other breastfeeding advocates encourage new mothers to breastfeed their babies for at least the first six months of their infants’ lives, arguing that breast milk is best for infants, families, and society, and it is cost free. Few empirical studies, however, document how the decision to breastfeed instead of formula-feed is associated with women’s post-birth earnings. This is an important omission, given that the majority of women today work for pay, and many work in job environments incompatible with breastfeeding. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, our results show that mothers who breastfeed for six months or longer suffer more severe and more prolonged earnings losses than do mothers who breastfeed for shorter durations or not at all. The larger post-birth drop in earnings for long-duration breastfeeders is due to a larger reduction in labor supply. We discuss the implications of these findings for gender equality at home and at work.
Bibliography Citation
Rippeyoung, Phyllis L. F. and Mary Christine Noonan. "Is Breastfeeding Truly Cost Free? Income Consequences of Breastfeeding for Women." American Sociological Review 77,2 (April 2012): 244-267.
2. Rippeyoung, Phyllis L. F.
Noonan, Mary Christine
Is Breastfeeding Truly Free? The Economic Consequences of Breastfeeding for Women
Presented: Detroit MI, Population Association of America Meetings, April-May 2009
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Breastfeeding; Earnings; Income; Maternal Employment; Modeling, Mixed Effects; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research has clearly demonstrated that income and work status are two strong predictors of whether or not a mother breastfeeds her child: income has a positive effect and work status has a negative effect on the odds of a woman breastfeeding versus formula feeding her child. However, the effect of breastfeeding on women’s employment outcomes is largely unknown. Since breastfeeding is currently less compatible with work than formula feeding, women who breastfeed their children may be more likely to take an extended maternity leave, reduce their work hours after childbirth, or quit work entirely. These strategies will potentially lead to lower earnings in the short-term and may also affect long-term economic prospects by reducing mothers’ prospects for promotions or raises. Using growth modeling and fixed effects techniques, we use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to assess whether there are long-term differences in the earnings trajectories between breastfeeding and formula feeding mothers.
Bibliography Citation
Rippeyoung, Phyllis L. F. and Mary Christine Noonan. "Is Breastfeeding Truly Free? The Economic Consequences of Breastfeeding for Women." Presented: Detroit MI, Population Association of America Meetings, April-May 2009.