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Author: Presser, Harriet B.
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Presser, Harriet B.
Shift Work and Child Care Among Young Dual-Earner American Parents
Journal of Marriage and Family 50,1 (February 1988): 133-148.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352434
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Child Care; Gender Differences; Part-Time Work

This study uncovers a high rate of non-day employment among young dual-earner American parents and examines the relationship between shift status (fixed day, fixed nonday, and rotating) and child care. Special attention is given to parental child care when the spouse is employed. The study is based on the 1984 wave of the NLSY, a cohort of 19 to 26 year olds in 1984. A subset of married parents with employed spouses and with children under five years old was selected for analysis. Reliance on spouses for child care when dual-earner couples are employed is much higher when respondents work non-days rather than days. This is particularly evident when both primary and secondary child care arrangements are considered and when the extent of non-overlapping hours is taken into account. Although mothers participate more in child care when fathers are employed than vice versa, father care is substantial. Gender differences in the determinants of parental care and the issue of whether shift work is a solution to the child care problem are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Presser, Harriet B. "Shift Work and Child Care Among Young Dual-Earner American Parents." Journal of Marriage and Family 50,1 (February 1988): 133-148.
2. Presser, Harriet B.
Some Economic Complexities of Child Care Provided by Grandmothers
Journal of Marriage and Family 51,3 (August 1989): 581-591.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352158
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Child Care; Employment; Grandparents; Household Composition; Maternal Employment; Mothers

This study focuses on grandmothers as providers of child care, exploring some of the economic complexities involved. The sample is comprised of employed mothers age 19 to 26 with children under age 5, drawn from the 1984 NLSY. It was found that the care of these young children when their mothers are employed is mostly by relatives, and that grandmothers are the primary relative; this is most evident for children of unmarried mothers. Analysis of the grandmothers who provide child care reveals that about one-third are otherwise employed. The work schedules of these grandmothers are compared to the hours of child care they provide and the mother's work schedule; this comparison suggests a more complex negotiation of work and family roles between grandmothers and mothers (as well as between mothers and fathers) than is generally acknowledged. Moreover, it was found that one- third of grandmothers are paid in cash for the care of their grandchild, and that whether cash payment is made varies significantly by the number of hours grandmother care is provided as well as by the mother's hourly wage. Payment in cash or services (combined) is affected by the grandmother's employment status; when otherwise employed, such payment is less likely. It is noted that the demand for infant and toddler care is increasing while the availability of grandmother care seems to be on the decline. Further research is needed that will more fully document the adaptations made and their consequences for both children and parents.
Bibliography Citation
Presser, Harriet B. "Some Economic Complexities of Child Care Provided by Grandmothers." Journal of Marriage and Family 51,3 (August 1989): 581-591.
3. Presser, Harriet B.
Young American Parents as Shiftworkers: Their Distinctive Socio-Demographic Characteristics
In: Comtemporary Advances in Shiftwork Research: Theoretical and Practical Aspects in the Late 80s. A. Oginski, et al., eds. Poland: Medical Academy, 1987
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Poland Medical Academy
Keyword(s): Fathers; Gender Differences; Geographical Variation; Industrial Sector; Mothers; Occupational Segregation; Occupations; Shift Workers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines various socio-demographic characteristics of young American parents who work as shift workers, using data from the NLSY. It was found that 27% of the mothers and 32% of the fathers in this sample worked either fixed or rotating non-day schedules. Gender differences were found with full-time employed fathers who worked as fixed non-day workers more likely to reside in large metropolitan areas, least likely to live in the south, more likely to be enrolled in school, and to have two or more children. On the other hand, full time employed fixed non-day working mothers were likely to not live in an SMSA, to not have been employed during the previous year, to not be a high school graduate and, if married, to have a nonemployed spouse. Gender-related occupational and industrial differences were found with young married full-time employed fathers working in blue- collar occupations while comparable mothers worked primarily in administrative support and service occupations. More detailed analyses of shift work patterns and their relationship to childcare and fertility are planned.
Bibliography Citation
Presser, Harriet B. "Young American Parents as Shiftworkers: Their Distinctive Socio-Demographic Characteristics" In: Comtemporary Advances in Shiftwork Research: Theoretical and Practical Aspects in the Late 80s. A. Oginski, et al., eds. Poland: Medical Academy, 1987
4. Presser, Harriet B.
Ward, Brian W.
Nonstandard Work Schedules over the Life Course: A First Look
Monthly Labor Review 134,7 (July 2011): 3-16.
Also: http://bls.gov/opub/mlr/2011/07/art1exc.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Maternal Employment; Racial Differences; Shift Workers; Work Experience; Work Histories; Work History; Work Hours; Work, Atypical

High percentages of Americans work nonstandard schedules over the course of their worklife; almost 90 percent of those ages 14 to 18 in 1979 had at least one such experience by age 39, with some marked differences by gender, race or ethnicity, and education.
Bibliography Citation
Presser, Harriet B. and Brian W. Ward. "Nonstandard Work Schedules over the Life Course: A First Look." Monthly Labor Review 134,7 (July 2011): 3-16.