Search Results

Author: Porterfield, Shirley
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Porterfield, Shirley
Kwon, Eunsun
Caregiving and Preparation for Retirement
Innovation in Aging 3,S1 (November 2019): S382.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/innovateage/article/3/Supplement_1/S382/5615080
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): Caregivers, Adult Children; Expectations/Intentions; Gender Differences; Retirement; Savings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Saving for retirement should begin with the first job, but preparation with respect to determining a specific retirement age and plans for post-retirement life, generally occurs closer to the retirement date. However, among those who provide care for family or close friends who are elderly and/or have disabilities, retirement preparation may take a back seat to more pressing current concerns. While we know quite a lot about patterns of saving for retirement and the factors that influence those patterns, we know little about retirement expectations and patterns of thinking about and planning for the broader retirement experience, particularly among caregivers. This paper uses data from the 2008-2016 rounds of the nationally-representative 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine retirement expectations and five areas of retirement preparation (reading, using a computer app, consulting a financial planner, calculating income, or attending meetings) among employed adults (ages 51-59 in 2016) who are or are not providing care for someone in or out of their household. Longitudinal analysis finds significantly lower retirement preparation among adults caring for someone inside versus outside the household, as well as significantly lower preparation activities among female versus male caregivers. Caregiving influences employment and, in turn, the types of retirement accounts held by men and women. Although caregiving is associated with decreased retirement savings among both men and women who have pension accounts, retirement preparation activities in 2008 and 2012 are associated with higher retirement savings in 2016.
Bibliography Citation
Porterfield, Shirley and Eunsun Kwon. "Caregiving and Preparation for Retirement." Innovation in Aging 3,S1 (November 2019): S382.
2. Porterfield, Shirley
Tracey, Colleen
Disentangling Dynamics of Family Poverty and Child Disability: What if Disability Comes First?
Presented: San Diego, CA, Society for Social Work and Research Meetings, January 2003.
Also: http://csd.wustl.edu/Publications/Documents/WP03-01.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Society for the Study of Social Problems
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Child Health; Children, Poverty; Disability; Divorce; Poverty; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Point-in-time research indicates that children with disabilities are significantly more likely to live in families in poverty than are children without disabilities. However it does not follow that children with disabilities or chronic illness are more likely to be born into families in poverty than children who are not diagnosed with anything. Thus, poverty may result from the birth of the disabled child rather than be a causal factor in the disability. To date, no other research has discussed this issue of chronology between poverty and disability.

This paper examines this proposition using the linked 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79 - data on mothers) and NLSY79 Child and Youth Supplement data. All families are followed backward in time in order to examine their characteristics before the birth of their first child (for families without a child with disabilities) or before the birth of their first child with disabilities (for families with a disabled child). We estimate the impact the birth of a child with disabilities has on the likelihood that their family will fall into poverty or use AFDC/TANF, controlling for pre- and post-birth characteristics of parents and other family members. The results of this estimation suggest that causality is mixed. Descriptive statistics show that children with disabilities are more likely to be born to families in poverty (12.1 percent are in poverty the year before the child is born versus 8.9 percent of families who never have a disabled child in the year before their oldest child is born). This suggests that an enhanced focus on prenatal care for low-income families may be appropriate. However, the birth of a disabled child also significantly increases the risk of entering poverty for families (17.9 percent have family incomes below the poverty line one year after the birth of the oldest disabled child). Families who never have a disabled child have no significant change in their risk of poverty between the year prior to their oldest child's birth and the year after the birth of that child. This indicates that enhanced support services for these families may significantly improve the welfare of not only disabled children, but their family members and the communities in which they live as well. To the extent that other social risks also follow from the increased risk of poverty in families with disabled children (such as divorce and involvement with the child welfare system), policy intervention may lead to other social improvements.

Also: Center for Social Development Working Paper No. 03-01, March 25, 2003.

Bibliography Citation
Porterfield, Shirley and Colleen Tracey. "Disentangling Dynamics of Family Poverty and Child Disability: What if Disability Comes First?" Presented: San Diego, CA, Society for Social Work and Research Meetings, January 2003.
3. Porterfield, Shirley
Tracey, Colleen
Disentangling the Dynamics of Family Poverty and Child Disability: Does Disability Come First?
CSD Working Paper No. 03-01, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University - St. Louis, March 2003.
Also: http://csd.wustl.edu/Publications/Documents/WP03-01.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Child Health; Children, Poverty; Disability; Divorce; Family Income; Poverty; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The passage of welfare reform in 1996 inexorably altered the relationship between the U.S. government and what are arguably its least able citizens. Not only were adults in families receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) now required to begin working a stipulated number of hours per week, but the federal legislation made no accommodations for families whose children, due either to chronic illness or disability, required additional parental time and resources. The impact of federal welfare reform legislation on these families has been the subject of ongoing examination. This paper provides background for the analysis of such policy implications by analyzing the causal relationship between poverty and child disability. Despite a plethora of research on the general association between poverty and child disability, the direction of causation between these two factors remains unclear. We don't know whether children with disabilities are more likely to be born into families in poverty than children without disabilities. For many families, poverty may result from the birth of the disabled child rather than be a causal factor in the disability. In this paper we explore this proposition by following families backward in time in order to examine their characteristics before and after the birth of their children.
Bibliography Citation
Porterfield, Shirley and Colleen Tracey. "Disentangling the Dynamics of Family Poverty and Child Disability: Does Disability Come First?" CSD Working Paper No. 03-01, Center for Social Development, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University - St. Louis, March 2003.