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Author: Petts, Richard James
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Petts, Amy L.
Petts, Richard James
Gender Matters: Racial Variation and Marital Stability Among Intraracial Couples
Journal of Family Issues published online (9 May 2019): DOI: 10.1177/0192513X19849631.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0192513X19849631
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Marital Stability; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Studies assessing differences between intraracial and interracial marriages typically use race data from one time point. Yet because racial identification can vary across time, context, or perspective, whether a relationship is defined as intraracial or interracial can also differ. We use a sample of 2,845 respondents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997, whose marriages are intraracial (based on 2002 data) to examine whether marital stability differs for those whose racial identification varied across waves and whether this effect is moderated by gender. Approximately 6% of respondents in intraracial relationships had inconsistent racial identities. We also find evidence that the association between racial variation and marital stability differs by gender. Women whose race varied are more likely to divorce than any other group, including static-race couples and men whose race varied. More attention should be given to intraracial heterogeneity, especially as groups that are more likely to have varying racial identities grow in number.
Bibliography Citation
Petts, Amy L. and Richard James Petts. "Gender Matters: Racial Variation and Marital Stability Among Intraracial Couples." Journal of Family Issues published online (9 May 2019): DOI: 10.1177/0192513X19849631.
2. Petts, Richard James
Family and Religious Characteristics' Influence on Delinquency Trajectories from Adolescence to Young Adulthood
American Sociological Review 74,3 (June 2009): 465-483.
Also: http://asr.sagepub.com/content/74/3/465.short
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior, Antisocial; CESD (Depression Scale); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Family Influences; Family Structure; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Interaction; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Religious Influences; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study takes a life-course approach to examine whether family and religious characteristics influence individual-level delinquency trajectories from early adolescence through young adulthood. Based on data from the NLSY79, results suggest that residing with two parents deters youths from becoming delinquent and that supportive parenting practices reduce their likelihood of becoming involved in delinquent behavior early in adolescence. There is also evidence that family and religion interact to predict delinquency trajectories. Religion enhances the effect of parental affection in deterring delinquent behavior and mitigates the increased risk of high levels of delinquent behavior among youths in single-parent families. Moreover, the findings indicate that delinquency trajectories are not immutable; family transitions are associated with increases in delinquency, but religious participation throughout adolescence and marriage are associated with declines in delinquent behavior. Overall, results suggest that family and religious characteristics continually influence the extent to which youths commit delinquent acts.
Bibliography Citation
Petts, Richard James. "Family and Religious Characteristics' Influence on Delinquency Trajectories from Adolescence to Young Adulthood." American Sociological Review 74,3 (June 2009): 465-483.
3. Petts, Richard James
Family, Religion, and Well-Being from Adolescence to Young Adulthood: Patterns of Religious Participation and the Influence of Family and Religious Characteristics on Trajectories of Well-Being
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Ohio State University, 2008
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavior, Antisocial; CESD (Depression Scale); Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Family Characteristics; Family Influences; Family Structure; Heterogeneity; Parent-Child Interaction; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Religious Influences; Transition, Adulthood; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Adolescence is a developmental stage often marked by stress as youth transition from childhood into adulthood. Although many studies have examined behaviors throughout adolescence, much is still unknown about the trajectories that adolescents follow and factors that shape these pathways. Drawing on social integration and social control theories, I focus on how family and religion predict and shape trajectories of religious participation and two indicators of well-being, delinquent behavior and depressive symptoms, from early adolescence into young adulthood.

Data is taken from the 1988-2004 waves of the Child and Young Adult sample of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79). My sample consists of 2,472 youth who were interviewed from early adolescence (ages 10-14) through young adulthood (ages 20-25). Utilizing a group-based method of trajectory analysis, I examine whether family characteristics (e.g., family structure, processes, and resources) and religious characteristics (e.g., religious commitments within families, religious participation, and religious heterogamy) predict these trajectories independently and in accordance with one another, and also whether family and religious changes alter these trajectories over time.

Results show that despite many different individual pathways, a few trajectories of religious participation, delinquency, and depressive symptoms are commonly experienced by youth. For example, although most youth decrease their religious participation during adolescence, some youth maintain a constant level of religious participation while others actually increase their involvement as they move into young adulthood. In addition, although many youth report increased delinquency and depression during adolescence, other youth experience consistently high levels of well-being.

I also find that family and religious characteristics influence these trajectories. Residing with two parents, having supportive parents, and residing in a religious family all increase the likelihood that youth remain religious and experience greater well-being throughout adolescence. Moreover, religion appears to enhance the effects of family support on adolescent well-being and compensate for a lack of social control and integration in some families. Finally, there is evidence that family and religious changes may affect religious participation and well-being in young adulthood.

Overall, this dissertation provides a comprehensive illustration of the trajectories of religious participation, delinquent behavior, and depressive symptoms that youth experience into adulthood and how family and religious characteristics continually shape these trajectories.

Bibliography Citation
Petts, Richard James. Family, Religion, and Well-Being from Adolescence to Young Adulthood: Patterns of Religious Participation and the Influence of Family and Religious Characteristics on Trajectories of Well-Being. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Sociology, Ohio State University, 2008.
4. Petts, Richard James
Family, Religious Attendance, and Trajectories of Psychological Well-being among Youth
Journal of Family Psychology 28,6 (December 2014): 759-768.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/fam/28/6/759
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Behavior, Antisocial; Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Educational Attainment; Family Influences; Family Structure; Modeling, Multilevel; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Interaction; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Religion; Religious Influences; Transition, Adulthood

Despite numerous studies on adolescent well-being, longitudinal research on the influence of religion on well-being is lacking, and limited studies have looked at how family and religion may work in conjunction with one another to influence adolescent well-being. This study addresses these limitations by using longitudinal data on 5,739 youth to explore whether family structure, changes in family structure, parent–child relationship quality, and religious attendance (overall and with parents) influence trajectories of psychological well-being independently and in conjunction with one another. Results support previous research in showing that parental interaction and attending religious services with parent(s) in late childhood are associated with higher psychological well-being, whereas conflict with parents and residing in a nontraditional family in late childhood are associated with lower well-being among youth. Finally, there is evidence suggesting that attending religious services with parent(s) amplifies the positive influence of parental interaction on psychological well-being, and overall levels of religious attendance over time are less likely to increase well-being among adolescents raised by single parents than for adolescents raised by married parents. (PsycINFO Database Record © 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Petts, Richard James. "Family, Religious Attendance, and Trajectories of Psychological Well-being among Youth." Journal of Family Psychology 28,6 (December 2014): 759-768.
5. Petts, Richard James
Miscarriage, Religious Participation, and Mental Health
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Religion

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Approximately 15-20% of pregnancies result in miscarriage, yet pregnancy loss remains a socially taboo topic and one that has received only limited attention in the literature. Utilizing nationally representative longitudinal data from the NLSY97, this study examines the influence of miscarriage on mental health and whether this relationship is moderated by religious participation. Results from this study suggest that miscarriage is associated with lower mental health among women who also experience a live birth. Results also suggest that religious participation moderates the relationship between miscarriage and mental health; religion is more likely to lead to increases in mental health among women who experience a miscarriage than among women who do not experience a miscarriage. Overall, evidence suggests that religion may be an important coping mechanism for women who deal with pregnancy loss.
Bibliography Citation
Petts, Richard James. "Miscarriage, Religious Participation, and Mental Health." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.
6. Petts, Richard James
Miscarriage, Religious Participation, and Mental Health
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 57,1 (March 2018): 109-122.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jssr.12500
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Society for the Scientific Study of Religion
Keyword(s): Health, Mental; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Religion

Approximately 15–20 percent of pregnancies result in miscarriage, yet pregnancy loss remains a socially taboo topic and one that has received limited attention in the literature. Utilizing nationally representative longitudinal data from the NLSY97, this study examines the influence of miscarriage on mental health and whether this relationship is moderated by religious participation. Results from this study suggest that miscarriage is associated with lower mental health among women who also experience a live birth. Results also suggest that religious participation moderates the relationship between miscarriage and mental health; religion is more likely to lead to increases in mental health among women who experience a miscarriage than among women who do not experience a miscarriage. Overall, evidence suggests that religion may be an important coping mechanism for women who deal with pregnancy loss.
Bibliography Citation
Petts, Richard James. "Miscarriage, Religious Participation, and Mental Health." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 57,1 (March 2018): 109-122.
7. Petts, Richard James
Paternity Leave, Religion, and Father Involvement with Children
Presented: Chicago IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Fathers, Involvement; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity; Religion

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Expectations for fathers have changed in recent decades, and fathers are now expected to be more involved in their children's lives. However, little research has examined policies that would allow fathers to meet the increased demands placed on them. Using data from the NLSY97, this study contributes to this gap in the literature by focusing on the determinants and consequences of paternity leave-taking, examining whether religious fathers are more likely to take paternity leave, whether paternity leave is linked to father involvement, and whether this relationship is moderated by religious participation. Overall, results from this study were mixed. Most new fathers in the NLSY97 did not take paid paternity leave. Results also suggest that weekly religious attendance increases the likelihood of taking a few days of paid paternity leave, but monthly attendance decreases the likelihood of taking 1-2 weeks of paid paternity leave. In addition, although this study provides no evidence linking paternity leave-taking to father involvement, results suggest that religious participation is associated with a higher likelihood of reading and bathing/dressing children daily among fathers who take paternity leave. Future research should continue to focus on the determinants and consequences of paternity leave as well as strategies to increase father engagement in family life more generally.
Bibliography Citation
Petts, Richard James. "Paternity Leave, Religion, and Father Involvement with Children." Presented: Chicago IL, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2015.
8. Petts, Richard James
Trajectories of Religious Participation from Adolescence to Young Adulthood
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 48,3 (September 2009): 552–571.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-5906.2009.01465.x/full
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Society for the Scientific Study of Religion
Keyword(s): Child Self-Administered Supplement (CSAS); Family Influences; Family Structure; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Interaction; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Religion; Religious Influences; Transition, Adulthood

Using a life course approach, this study examines trajectories of religious participation from early adolescence through young adulthood. Distinct patterns of religious participation are identified, providing insight into how trajectories are shaped by family and religious characteristics and demonstrating the influence of life events on changes in religious participation. The study employs a group-based method of trajectory analysis, identifying three trajectories of stable religious participation (nonattendance, occasional attendance, and frequent attendance) and three trajectories of change (early, late, and gradual declining attendance). Residing with two biological parents and in a religious family increases the likelihood that youth attend religious services throughout adolescence. Religious disaffiliation is associated with lower religious participation for youth in all trajectories; marriage, cohabitation, and religious switching/conversion are associated with changes in participation among youth in the frequent and occasional attendance trajectories only.
Bibliography Citation
Petts, Richard James. "Trajectories of Religious Participation from Adolescence to Young Adulthood." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 48,3 (September 2009): 552–571. A.
9. Petts, Richard James
Knoester, Chris
Li, Qi
Attitudes, Patterns, and Predictors of Paternity Leave-Taking among U.S. Fathers
Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Fathers; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Surprisingly few studies have focused on paternity leave-taking in the U.S. This study utilizes data from four national datasets to provide a comprehensive examination of the attitudes, practices, and predictors of paternity leave-taking in the U.S. Specifically, this study focuses on (a) describing attitudes towards, and practices of, paternity leave-taking in the U.S. and (b) analyzing the extent to which economic capital, social capital, and father identities predict these attitudes and practices. The results indicate that most people support paid paternity leave opportunities in the U.S. Yet, rates of paid paternity leave-taking are relatively low and most fathers take total leaves that last one week or less. Economic capital, social capital, and father identities that prioritize engaged fathering are positively associated with taking leave and taking longer periods of leave. Overall, the results emphasize that the current structure of U.S. paternity leave policies may contribute to patterns of inequality due to more advantaged fathers having greater access and ability to take paternity leave than less advantaged fathers.
Bibliography Citation
Petts, Richard James, Chris Knoester and Qi Li. "Attitudes, Patterns, and Predictors of Paternity Leave-Taking among U.S. Fathers." Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017.