Search Results

Author: Peng, Eric J.
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Rascoe, Alexander S.
Peng, Eric J.
Ferrell, Dre’Marcus
Copp, Jonathan A.
Liu, Raymond W.
The Relationship Between Height and Income With Potential Application to Treatment of Limb Length Discrepancy
Cureus published online (17 March 2024).
Also: https://www.cureus.com/articles/238246-the-relationship-between-height-and-income-with-potential-application-to-treatment-of-limb-length-discrepancy#!/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer Nature Group
Keyword(s): College Education; Education, Higher; Education, Postsecondary; Financial Assistance; Financial Well-Being; Height; Income; Limb Length Discrepancy (LLD); Socioeconomic Factors; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Purpose: When treating limb length discrepancy (LLD), decisions regarding lengthening versus contralateral shortening require careful consideration of deformity and patient factors. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) database, and income as a quantitative representation of overall socioeconomic benefit, we sought to determine the height at which incremental gains in height have the greatest value.

Methods: Using the NLSY79 database, we collected demographic data, height, yearly income from wages, college education (full- or part-time), and receipt of government financial aid. Multiple-linear regression and graphical analysis were performed.

Results: The study population included 9,652 individuals, 4,775 (49.5%) males and 4,877 (50.5%) females. Mean heights were 70.0±3.0 inches and 64.3±2.6 inches for males and females, respectively. Multiple-linear regression analysis (adjusted-r²=0.33) demonstrated height had a standardized-ß=0.097 (p<0.001), even when accounting for confounding factors. Using graphical analysis, we estimated cut-offs of 74 inches for males and 69 inches for females, beyond which income decreased with incremental height.

Conclusions: Using income as a quantitative representation of socioeconomic value, our analysis found income increased with incremental height in individuals with predicted heights up to 74 inches for males and 69 inches for females. Shortening procedures might receive more consideration at predicted heights greater than these cut-offs, while lengthening might be more strongly considered at the lower ranges of height. Additionally, our multiple-linear regression analysis confirms the correlation between height and income, when factoring in other predictors of income.

Bibliography Citation
Rascoe, Alexander S., Eric J. Peng, Dre’Marcus Ferrell, Jonathan A. Copp and Raymond W. Liu. "The Relationship Between Height and Income With Potential Application to Treatment of Limb Length Discrepancy." Cureus published online (17 March 2024).