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Author: Papps, Kerry Liam
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Papps, Kerry Liam
Effects of Divorce Risk on the Labour Supply of Married Couples
Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 29-31, 2007.
Also: http://paa2007.princeton.edu/abstractViewer.aspx?submissionId=70935
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Divorce; Life Cycle Research; Marital Status; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper presents a model of lifetime utility maximization in which expectations of future marital transitions play a role in the determination of work hours. Married people with spouses who earn more are predicted to devote additional time to the labour market when they are confronted with a high likelihood of divorce and vice versa. Similarly, work hours should be positively associated with marriage probability for single people who expect to marry a higher earning spouse. These predictions are tested using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Marriage and divorce probabilities are calculated from proportional hazard models and are included in regressions of annual hours. Married women are found to work more when they face a high divorce probability. This relationship holds both over an individual's life-cycle and across people with different inherent risks of divorce and is robust to the use of alternative marital transition measures.
Bibliography Citation
Papps, Kerry Liam. "Effects of Divorce Risk on the Labour Supply of Married Couples." Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 29-31, 2007.
2. Papps, Kerry Liam
Female Labour Supply and Spousal Education
IZA Discussion Paper No. 5348. Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), November 2010.
Also: http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract?dp_id=5348
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Educational Attainment; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Husbands; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Three hypotheses are given to explain why a married woman's work hours might be related to her husband's education, even controlling for his wage rate. Data for a single cohort of women from the NLSY 1979 suggest that women's work hours are positively related to spousal education at the time of marriage but also fall more rapidly over time after marriage among those with the most educated husbands. Cross-sectional data from the CPS for 1980-2010 indicate that the latter effect appears to have increased since 2000. Both men's and women's preferences for a traditional division of labour within the household are found to be negatively related to the husband’s education among newlyweds but to rise faster over the course of a marriage when the husband is highly educated. Overall, the results provide evidence consistent with both marital sorting on the basis of attitudes to female work and changes in tastes that are influenced by marital quality. Little support is found for the argument that spousal education measures non-market productivity.
Bibliography Citation
Papps, Kerry Liam. "Female Labour Supply and Spousal Education." IZA Discussion Paper No. 5348. Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), November 2010.
3. Papps, Kerry Liam
Productivity Spillovers Within Families and Firms
Ph.D. Dissertation, Cornell University, 2008. DAI-A 69/02, Aug 2008
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Divorce; Gender Differences; Human Capital; Labor Supply; Life Course; Marriage; Wage Determination

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Economists have traditionally assumed that people's productivity in the labor market is determined solely by the choices they make over the course of their lifetime and have paid relatively little attention to the possibility that productivity might be influenced by the attributes and decisions of the people they live and work with. This dissertation reports evidence that such productivity spillovers exist, both within households and within firms. The first chapter examines whether a person's work hours are influenced by his/her likelihood of changing marital state. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 are used and three different methods for measuring the probability of marriage and divorce are employed. Consistent with theoretical predictions, married women are found to work more when they face a high probability of divorce. This relationship holds both over an individual's life-cycle and across people with different inherent risks of divorce. The second chapter explores whether team-mate performance influences individual performance and salaries in Major League Baseball. Team-mates may inflate a player's output in a single year or they may have a lasting influence on his performance. Evidence of these effects, which are termed spillovers and learning, respectively, are found among both pitchers and non-pitchers. Pitchers are more likely to post low earned run averages if other pitchers on their team achieve low earned run averages in the same season or the previous season. Batters tend to have high batting averages if their team-mates had high batting averages in the previous season. Team performance measures are found to have some direct influence on salary, however they operate largely indirectly, by augmenting individual performance. Finally, the third chapter examines the effects coworker ability has on wages in the wider labor market, using matched employer-employee data that have been constructed by the United States Census Bureau. The average levels of education and tenure among a person's co-workers are found to have a positive effect on wages, indicating the presence of human capital spillovers. Coworker tenure has a bigger impact on new entrants to a firm. Co-worker education has a larger effect on highly-educated women but not men.
Bibliography Citation
Papps, Kerry Liam. Productivity Spillovers Within Families and Firms. Ph.D. Dissertation, Cornell University, 2008. DAI-A 69/02, Aug 2008.