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Author: Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Lewis, Susan Kay
Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid
Educational Assortative Mating Across Marriage Markets: Non-Hispanic Whites in the United States
Demography 37,1 (February 2000): 29-40.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/p46r1515r2240263/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Educational Attainment; Educational Status; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The writers analyze the effect of local marriage markets' educational composition on educational assortative mating and on how sorting varies with age. They expect that in less educationally concentrated marriage markets, residents are more likely to marry hypogamously along education and predict that the less the degree of educational concentration in a marriage market, the more residents' chance of educational hypogamy increases with age. Drawing on individual data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and community descriptors aggregated from census microdata, they estimate a discrete-time competing-risks model of educational sorting outcomes. Their findings reveal that residents of educationally less favorable marriage markets are more likely to marry down on education and that, for women, their chance of doing so rises with age more than for residents of more favorable markets. Copyright: Database Producer Copyright (c) the H.W. Wilson Company. All rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Lewis, Susan Kay and Valerie Kincaid Oppenheimer. "Educational Assortative Mating Across Marriage Markets: Non-Hispanic Whites in the United States." Demography 37,1 (February 2000): 29-40.
2. Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid
Cohabiting and Marriage During Young Men's Career-Development Process
Demography 40,1 (February 2003): 127-149.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/b375408371723548/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Cohabitation; Event History; Male Sample; Marriage; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using recently released cohabitation data for the male sample of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, first interviewed in 1979, I conducted multinomial discrete-time event-history analyses of how young men's career-development process affects both the formation and the dissolution of cohabiting unions. For a substantial proportion of young men, cohabitation seemed to represent an adaptive strategy during a period of career immaturity, whereas marriage was a far more likely outcome for both stably employed cohabitors and noncohabitors alike. Earnings positively affected the entry into either a cohabiting or marital union but exhibited a strong threshold effect. Once the men were in cohabiting unions, however, earnings had little effect on the odds of marrying. Men with better long-run socioeconomic prospects were far more likely to marry from either the noncohabiting or cohabiting state, and this was particularly true for blacks.
Bibliography Citation
Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid. "Cohabiting and Marriage During Young Men's Career-Development Process." Demography 40,1 (February 2003): 127-149.
3. Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid
Cohabiting and Marriage Formation During Young Men's Career Development Process
On-Line Working Paper Series: CCPR-004-02 , California Center for Population Research, University of California - Los Angeles, September 2002.
Also: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/85d3283r
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: California Center for Population Research (CCPR)
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Cohabitation; Event History; Male Sample; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Revised version of a paper presented at the 2001 PAA annual meetings.
Using recently released cohabitation data for NLSY79 males, this study conducts multinomial discrete-time event history-analyses of how young men's career development process affects both the formation and dissolution of cohabiting unions. For a substantial proportion of young men, cohabitation seems to represent an adaptive strategy during a period of career immaturity, as measured by employment instability, while marriage was a far more likely outcome for both stably employed cohabitors and noncohabitors alike. Earnings positively affected the entry into either a cohabiting or marital union and exhibited a strong threshold effect. However, consistent with a selectivity argument, once cohabiting, earnings had little effect on the odds of marrying out of a cohabitation although higher earnings did discourage separations among whites. Men with better long-run socioeconomic prospects, i.e., the college educated, were far more likely to marry from either the noncohabiting or cohabiting state and this was particularly true for blacks.
Bibliography Citation
Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid. "Cohabiting and Marriage Formation During Young Men's Career Development Process." On-Line Working Paper Series: CCPR-004-02 , California Center for Population Research, University of California - Los Angeles, September 2002.
4. Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid
Kalmijn, Matthijs
Life-Cycle Jobs
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 14 (1995): 1-38
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: JAI Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Job Patterns; Job Status; Life Cycle Research; Mobility, Social; Racial Differences; Stratification; Unions

Based on occupation and industry data from the 1% 1970 Public Use Sample, a life-cycle job typology is used to distinguish youthful "stopgap" jobs from career jobs. Census and National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data indicate that stopgap jobs represent a life-cycle phenomenon for both black and white male youths, although more so for whites. Stopgap employment increased for young white males between 1970-1980 but decreased for blacks. Education and experience variables make a substantial contribution to the steep age gradient of stopgap employment and are important in explaining black-white differences in this age pattern in 1970 as well as the 1970-1980 changes. Implications of these differences for the youth labor market are explored. The extensive employment of more educated whites in low-level stopgap jobs places less educated youth (black and white) at a competitive disadvantage. Furthermore, factors that negatively affect the labor market position of nondisadvantaged youths may indirectly affect the employment position of low-skilled youth. 6 Tables, 4 Figures, 1 Appendix, 20 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid and Matthijs Kalmijn. "Life-Cycle Jobs." Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 14 (1995): 1-38.
5. Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid
Kalmijn, Matthijs
Lim, Nelson
Men's Career Development and Marriage Timing During a Period of Rising Inequality
Working Paper, University of California - Los Angeles and Utrecht University, October 1996
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Author
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Earnings; Education Indicators; Event History; Job Analysis; Marriage; Racial Differences; Schooling; Transition Rates, Activity to Work; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid, Matthijs Kalmijn and Nelson Lim. "Men's Career Development and Marriage Timing During a Period of Rising Inequality." Working Paper, University of California - Los Angeles and Utrecht University, October 1996.
6. Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid
Kalmijn, Matthijs
Lim, Nelson
Men's Career Development and Marriage Timing During a Period of Rising Inequality
Demography 34,3 (August 1997): 311-330.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/x91g23831up18126/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Earnings; Education Indicators; Event History; Job Analysis; Marriage; Racial Differences; Schooling; Transition Rates, Activity to Work; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Based on data from 1979-1990 NLSY interviews, we investigate the implications of rising economic inequality for young men's marriage timing. Our approach is to relate marriage formation to the ease or difficulty of the career-entry process and to show that large race/schooling differences in career development lead to substantial variations in marriage timing. We develop measures of current career "maturity" and of long-term labor-market position. Employing discrete-time event-history methods, we show that these variables have a substantial impact on marriage formation for both blacks and whites. Applying our regression results to models based on observed race/schooling patterns of career development, we then estimate cumulative proportions ever married in a difficult versus an easy career-entry process. We find major differences in the pace of marriage formation, depending on the difficulty of the career transition. We also find considerable differences in these marriage timing patterns across race/schooling groups corresponding to the large observed differences in the speed and difficulty of career transitions between and within these groups. ©2000-2002 JSTOR
Bibliography Citation
Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid, Matthijs Kalmijn and Nelson Lim. "Men's Career Development and Marriage Timing During a Period of Rising Inequality." Demography 34,3 (August 1997): 311-330.
7. Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid
Kalmijn, Matthijs
Lim, Nelson
Lew, Vivian
Men's Career Development and Marriage Timing: Race and Schooling Differences
Presented: New Orleans, LA, Population Association of America, May 1996
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Earnings; Educational Returns; Event History; Job Analysis; Marriage; Racial Differences; Schooling; Work Experience

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Based upon data from 1979-1990 NLSY interviews, this study investigates how the ease or difficulty of young men's transition to a mature working life affects first-marriage timing. We develop measures of career "maturity" and of current as well as long-term earnings position and, employing discrete-time event-history methods, show that these have a substantial impact on marriage formation for both blacks and whites. Using our regression results, we then estimate cumulative proportions ever-married under two career-entry scenarios: a "difficult" vs. an "easier" career-entry process. We find major differences in the pace of marriage formation, depending on the difficulty of the career transition. We also find considerable differences in these marriage timing patterns across race-schooling groups, corresponding to the large observed differences m the speed and difficulty of career transitions among these groups. In conclusion, we argue that studying men's career-entry process can make an important contribution to understanding trends and differentials in marriage timing.
Bibliography Citation
Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid, Matthijs Kalmijn, Nelson Lim and Vivian Lew. "Men's Career Development and Marriage Timing: Race and Schooling Differences." Presented: New Orleans, LA, Population Association of America, May 1996.
8. Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid
Lewin, Alisa
Race and the Role of Economic Independence in Women's Marriage Formation
Presented: San Francisco, CA, Population Association of America Meetings, 1995
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Economic Independence; Economics of Gender; Event History; Heterogeneity; Labor Market Demographics; Marriage; Racial Differences; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using a discrete-time event history methodology on the 1979-1990 panel of black and non-Hispanic white women from the NLSY we examine the hypothesis that the desirability of marriage is less for women with economic alternatives to marriage. First we investigate whether women in a better potential and actual labor-market position are less likely to marry. Then the paper goes on to analyze the role of welfare in marriage behavior, focusing on black women. We describe the heterogeneous nature of the cohorts' AFDC experience over the years and our event history analysis then explores the implications of this for marriage formation. We go on to examine the confounding of the effects of AFDC dependency and labor-market position. Finally, the paper investigates how attractive the marital.
Bibliography Citation
Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid and Alisa Lewin. "Race and the Role of Economic Independence in Women's Marriage Formation." Presented: San Francisco, CA, Population Association of America Meetings, 1995.