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Author: O'Rand, Angela M.
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Farkas, Janice I.
O'Rand, Angela M.
The Pension Mix For Women In Middle and Late Life: The Changing Employment Relationship
Social Forces 76,3 (March 1998):1007-1032.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3005701
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Keyword(s): Gerontology; Life Course; Modeling; Modeling, Probit; Pensions; Retirement; Savings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Revised version of a paper presented at the Gerontological Society of America Meetings, Los Angeles CA, 1995. The effects of life-course, employment and labor market characteristics on the probability of pension participation and on type of pension coverage are estimated for two cohorts of working women in middle and late life, respectively. The National Longitudinal Surveys of Mature and Young Women are used to differentiate the relative importance of life course and diverse structural factors on worker pension participation and employer coverage patterns. The defined contribution plan is argued to be an indicator of the changing employment relationship which is relieving employers of pension liability and increasing workers' responsibilities for retirement saving. Probit regressions are used to estimate the relative risks for nonparticipation in any pension among these working women. Multinominal logistic models, controlling for selectivity, estimate cohort processes in workers' access to employer-provided pension types. The results reveal the relative importance for middle-aged and older women of life course and structural variables that reflect life stage and changing employment relationships. Younger cohorts appear to be relatively more vulnerable to the changing employment contract given their greater dependence on defined contribution plans and the conflict between family and market contingencies.
Bibliography Citation
Farkas, Janice I. and Angela M. O'Rand. "The Pension Mix For Women In Middle and Late Life: The Changing Employment Relationship." Social Forces 76,3 (March 1998):1007-1032.
2. Heidemann, Bridget
O'Rand, Angela M.
The Effects of Women's Economic Independence on Divorce: A Nash Bargaining Model in a Life Course Context
Presented: Miami, FL, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1994
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Bargaining Model; Divorce; Economic Independence; Economic Well-Being; Economics of Gender; Household Composition; Life Course; Modeling, Logit

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We explore the relationship between women's economic independence and the likelihood of divorce in midlife. Since the consequences of divorce depend on the presence and ages of children in the household, but the onset of the "empty nest" stage varies across marriages, we analyze the decision to divorce from a life course perspective. In particular, we investigate two hypotheses: I) ceteris paribus, an increase in the wife's economic independence increases the probability of marital dissolution and 2) the magnitude of this effect depends on the presence and ages of children in the household. To test these hypotheses, we estimate logit models of divorce using a sample of households from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women. In addition to demographic variables typically used to predict divorce, our explanatory variables include measures of the wife's economic independence interacted with dummy variables representing the age of the youngest child in the family.
Bibliography Citation
Heidemann, Bridget and Angela M. O'Rand. "The Effects of Women's Economic Independence on Divorce: A Nash Bargaining Model in a Life Course Context." Presented: Miami, FL, Population Association of America Meetings, May 1994.
3. Heidemann, Bridget
Suhomlinova, Olga
O'Rand, Angela M.
Economic Independence, Economic Status, and Empty Nest in Midlife Marital Disruption
Journal of Marriage and Family 60,1 (February 1998): 219-231.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/353453
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Divorce; Economic Independence; Economic Well-Being; Economics of Gender; Family Formation; Life Course; Marital Disruption; Marital Dissolution; Marital Status; Nestleaving

We examine the risk of separation or divorce later in the marital career from a family development perspective. With data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, we use a hazards framework to estimate the effects of women's economic independence, couples' economic status, and family life course factors on the risk of middle-age separation or divorce. Several dimensions of economic independence and economic status influence the risk of midlife marital disruption. Moreover, the transition to empty nest influences the risk of marital disruption, but the effect of empty nest depends on the duration of the marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Heidemann, Bridget, Olga Suhomlinova and Angela M. O'Rand. "Economic Independence, Economic Status, and Empty Nest in Midlife Marital Disruption." Journal of Marriage and Family 60,1 (February 1998): 219-231.
4. O'Rand, Angela M.
Farkas, Janice I.
Couples' Retirement Timing in the United States in the 1990s
International Journal of Sociology 32,2 (Summer 2002): 11-29
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: M.E. Sharpe, Inc.
Keyword(s): Exits; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Pensions; Retirement; Simultaneity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The timing of retirement among married couples is a complex process. As women remain attached to the labor market for longer periods of their lives and as they bring market resources such as pensions and health insurance to the couple's retirement decision, they introduce new contingencies to the process and variability in job exits. Couples are most likely to coordinate their retirement timing to be as simultaneous as possible. However, the second most likely pattern is for husbands to precede their wives into retirement. This study used the Mature Women sample of the National Longitudinal Surveys between 1989 and 1997 to track the effects of family, pension, health insurance, and changes in spousal health statuses on joint and sequential retirement patterns. Proportional hazards models reveal that joint retirement is most likely among couples in which wives reach the ages of eligibility for Social Security and Medicare and among couples who have defined benefit plans. Alternatively, wives' health insurance coverage from their own employment tends to result in their delayed retirements following their husbands'. Husbands' health limitations and caregiving needs also delay their wives' retirement, while wives' health limitations are more likely to result in joint retirement. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
O'Rand, Angela M. and Janice I. Farkas. "Couples' Retirement Timing in the United States in the 1990s." International Journal of Sociology 32,2 (Summer 2002): 11-29.
5. van Velsor, Ellen
O'Rand, Angela M.
Family Life Cycle, Work Career Patterns, and Women's Wages at Midlife
Journal of Marriage and Family 46,2 (May 1984): 365-373.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/352468
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations
Keyword(s): Childbearing; Family Influences; Life Cycle Research; Mothers; Wages, Women; Wives; Work Histories; Work Hours

The present study identifies midlife wage differentials across four employment timing patterns and finds that the wage attainment process itself varies by employment and timing patterns. Wives whose careers were interrupted for childbearing earn less, on the average, than wives employed during every life cycle stage, but more than wives with delayed work careers. Sectorial location is the most important determinant of wage for wives employed during every stage and among those whose work lives were interrupted by childbearing. The full-time or part time status of current employment is the most important determinant of wage among wives whose work lives began during the childbearing stage, while education is most important for wives who enter the work force after childbearing. The wage effects of birth cohort, education, employment continuity, female percentage of occupation in last job, and the full-time or part time status of that employment differ significantly across patterns, as well.
Bibliography Citation
van Velsor, Ellen and Angela M. O'Rand. "Family Life Cycle, Work Career Patterns, and Women's Wages at Midlife." Journal of Marriage and Family 46,2 (May 1984): 365-373.