Search Results

Author: Mizell, C. André
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Mizell, C. André
African American Men's Personal Sense of Mastery: The Consequences of the Adolescent Environment, Self-Concept, and Adult Achievement
Journal of Black Psychology 25,2 (May 1999): 210-230
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Earnings; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Life Course; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Pearlin Mastery Scale; Poverty; Self-Esteem; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, collected annually from 1979-1992, the objective of this study was to examine which factors over the life course contribute to African American males' personal sense of mastery. For the analysis on adult mastery, Ss were 892 African American males (aged 14-18 yrs in 1979 and 27-31 yrs in 1992). The Pearlin Mastery Scale was employed for the analysis. Independent variables were divided into adolescent background (poverty, parental education, religious attendance, region of origin), adolescent self-concept (self-esteem, educational aspirations), and adult achievement (educational attainment, earnings). Although adolescent poverty does not appear to hamper the adult mastery of African American men, results show that consequential adolescent variables are parental educational attainment, region of origin, self-esteem, and educational aspirations. The analysis also suggests that current adult achievement is also a significant determinant of adult mastery in African American males. Findings indicate that, despite the absence of economic and interpersonal resources in adolescence, African American males may be able to compensate for such deprivation through individual achievement--which directly affects personal mastery. ((c) 1999 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Mizell, C. André. "African American Men's Personal Sense of Mastery: The Consequences of the Adolescent Environment, Self-Concept, and Adult Achievement." Journal of Black Psychology 25,2 (May 1999): 210-230.
2. Mizell, C. André
Earnings’ Potential: The Consequences of Family Background, Adolescent Self-Concept, and Adult Labor Force Factors
Journal of African American Studies 4,3 (1999): 89-118
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Earnings; Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Family Background; Labor Force Participation; Life Course; Racial Differences; Regions; Religious Influences; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The objective of this research is to understand the life course processes that shape the earnings' potential of African American men. This research longitudinally investigates the effects of family background, adolescent self-concept and adult labor force conditions over a fourteen-year period. Findings indicate that such adolescent influences as poverty status and living in female-headed households are not significantly detrimental to the adult earnings of African American men. Further, while adolescent self esteem and aspirations are central to the earnings' potential of both black and white men, African American males may compensate for lower esteem and aspirations through adult achievement. And, finally, labor force participation, educational attainment and occupational status are important adult factors in predicting earnings for both African American and white men. However, African American men receive a benefit to earnings from labor force participation above and beyond that of their white male counterparts.
Bibliography Citation
Mizell, C. André. "Earnings’ Potential: The Consequences of Family Background, Adolescent Self-Concept, and Adult Labor Force Factors." Journal of African American Studies 4,3 (1999): 89-118.
3. Mizell, C. André
Life Course Influences on African American Men's Depression: Adolescent Parental Composition, Self-Concept, and Adult Earnings
Journal of Black Studies 29,4 (March 1999): 467-490.
Also: http://jbs.sagepub.com/content/29/4/467.full.pdf+html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Family Structure; Health, Mental; Life Course; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Pearlin Mastery Scale; Self-Esteem; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examined how family structure, parental achievement, adolescent self-esteem, adult socioeconomic attainment, and adult self-concept contribute to adult depression in African American males. Data were used from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979-1992). At the time of the initial interview, the age range was 14-18 yrs. Data obtained from 892 African American and 1,454 White males were used in a series of cumulative regression equations to explain the effects of adolescent and adult factors on adult depression and in a comparative analysis comparing the outcomes of Blacks to Whites. Results show that a female-headed household did not produce significantly higher levels of depression in Black males. Parental education was a significant negative predictor of depression; however, African American males with higher earnings and higher mastery were less at risk for depression. Having the status of "White male" was a protective factor against depression. An appendix of the items comprising depression, self-esteem, and mastery is provided. ((c) 1999 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Mizell, C. André. "Life Course Influences on African American Men's Depression: Adolescent Parental Composition, Self-Concept, and Adult Earnings." Journal of Black Studies 29,4 (March 1999): 467-490.
4. Mizell, C. André
Racial and Gender Variations in the Process Shaping Earnings' Potential: The Consequences of Poverty in Early Adulthood
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 27,2 (June 2000): 113-138.
Also: http://www.wmich.edu/hhs/newsletters_journals/jssw/27-2.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Earnings; Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Income; Job Tenure; Occupational Attainment; Occupational Status; Poverty; Racial Differences; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigates the effects of poverty in early adulthood on future earnings. While social scientists are beginning to amass a considerable literature on the effects of poverty on outcomes for children, few have investigated the damage that impoverishment may do in early adulthood when individuals are in the midst of completing education and planning careers. The findings in this study indicate that poverty does dampen earnings' potential. However, individual characteristics (e.g., aspirations, esteem and ability) and structural location (e.g., educational attainment, occupational status and job tenure) may assuage the otherwise negative effects of poverty. Other findings reveal that the process shaping earnings is very similar for white males compared to racial minorities and women. One exception is the impact of weekly hours worked on earnings. White males receive a benefit to earnings from weekly hours worked above and beyond that of White women, African American men, African American women and Mexican American women. Additionally, white men's earnings remain higher than African Americans, Mexican Americans and white women because of higher occupational attainment and longer job tenure.
Bibliography Citation
Mizell, C. André. "Racial and Gender Variations in the Process Shaping Earnings' Potential: The Consequences of Poverty in Early Adulthood." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 27,2 (June 2000): 113-138.
5. Mizell, C. André
Rising Above Poverty: The Consequences of Poverty Status and Individual Characteristics on Earnings
JCPR Working Paper 106, Joint Center for Poverty Research, Northwestern University/University of Chicago, July 2000.
Also: http://econpapers.repec.org/paper/wopjopovw/106.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Joint Center for Poverty Research
Keyword(s): Educational Aspirations/Expectations; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; Job Tenure; Occupational Attainment; Occupational Status; Poverty; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research investigates the effects of poverty in early adulthood on future earnings. While social scientists are beginning to amass a considerable literature on the effects of poverty on outcomes for children, few have investigated the damage that impoverishment may do in early adulthood when individuals are in the midst of completing education and planning careers. The findings in this study indicate that poverty does dampen earnings' potential. However, individual characteristics (e.g., aspirations, esteem and ability) and structural location (e.g., educational attainment, occupational status and job tenure) may assuage the otherwise negative effects of poverty. Other findings reveal that the process shaping earnings is very similar for white males compared to racial minorities and women. One exception is the impact of weekly hours worked on earnings. White males receive a benefit to earnings from weekly hours worked above and beyond that of White women, African American men, African American women and Mexican American women. Additionally, white men's earnings remain higher than African Americans, Mexican Americans and white women because of higher occupational attainment and longer job tenure.
Bibliography Citation
Mizell, C. André. "Rising Above Poverty: The Consequences of Poverty Status and Individual Characteristics on Earnings." JCPR Working Paper 106, Joint Center for Poverty Research, Northwestern University/University of Chicago, July 2000.
6. Mizell, C. André
Structural and Social Psychological Influences on the Adolescent Self-Concept, Adult Achievement and Adult Mental Health of African-American Males
Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1997
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Black Studies; Ethnic Studies; Family Structure; Family Studies; Health, Mental; Inner-City; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Occupational Attainment; Parental Influences; Pearlin Mastery Scale; Poverty; Racial Differences; Self-Esteem; Self-Perception; Variables, Independent - Covariate

This study investigates the impact of structural and social psychological factors on the adolescent self-concept, adult achievement and adult mental health of African American males. Three primary questions are asked: (1) What are the sources of African American male achievement? (2) Do structural (e.g., family composition and region of origin) and social psychological (e.g., self-esteem and aspirations) factors affect outcomes differently for those who begin in poverty compared to their non-poor counterparts, and (3) Do the benefits of material success for adult mental health differ depending on the African American male's adolescent poverty status? This is a longitudinal study, spanning fourteen years (1979-1992). The primary sample consists of 1,304 African-American male respondents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Regression models are estimated to predict adolescent aspirations, adolescent self-esteem, adult educational attainment, adult earnings, adult mastery and adult depression. The independent variables used in this investigation include the traditional structural variables such as poverty status, parental educational and occupational achievement, family structure and region of origin, as well as social psychological variables such as self-esteem, educational aspirations and mastery. As expected, the traditional structural variables are predictive of outcomes, but social psychological variables (esteem and aspirations) measured in adolescence also have significant effects even after controlling for the structural variables. For those who are impoverished in adolescence, the negative effects of poverty are exacerbated by larger family sizes, central city residence, and low parental educational attainment, but poverty status does not interact with socio-economic outcomes in affecting adult mental health. Finally, a subsample of 2,252 NLSY same cohort White males are added to the sample to test for differences by ethnicity. Most effects are constant across race; some exceptions are the greater benefits that accrue to Whites from some background variables, and the greater mental health benefits from earnings that accrue to African-Americans.
Bibliography Citation
Mizell, C. André. Structural and Social Psychological Influences on the Adolescent Self-Concept, Adult Achievement and Adult Mental Health of African-American Males. Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1997.
7. Mizell, C. André
Steelman, Lala Carr
All My Children: The Consequences of Sibling Group Characteristics on the Marital Happiness of Young Mothers
Journal of Family Issues 21, 7 (October 2000): 858-887.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/21/7/858.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Birth Preferences/Birth Expectations; Brothers; Family Size; Family Structure; Fathers, Involvement; Gender Differences; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Siblings; Sisters

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this research, we investigate how children shape maternal marital happiness. The findings reveal that the otherwise negative effects of sibship size are altered by the gender composition of the sibling group. Having sons tends to reduce the negative impact of sibling group size. Solving for main effects in the interactions that include sibship size by the gender composition of the sibling group, we find that having all sons affords the most beneficial consequences for marital happiness. The daughter-only groups have nonsignificant effects, and the mixed-gender sibships have the most deleterious influence on maternal marital happiness. Within a subsample of mixed-gender sibships only, we further find that mothers who have more boys than girls are more likely to report higher marital gratification. Generally speaking, our research demonstrates the need to examine both main and interaction effects of family structure on marital happiness.
Bibliography Citation
Mizell, C. André and Lala Carr Steelman. "All My Children: The Consequences of Sibling Group Characteristics on the Marital Happiness of Young Mothers." Journal of Family Issues 21, 7 (October 2000): 858-887.