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Author: McPartland, James M.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Braddock, Jomills H.
McPartland, James M.
More Evidence on Social-Psychological Processes that Perpetuate Minority Segregation: The Relationship of School Desegregation and Employment Desegregation
Report No. 338, Center for Social Organization of Schools, Johns Hopkins University, June 1983
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Center for Social Organization of Schools, Johns Hopkins University
Keyword(s): Employment; Geographical Variation; Occupational Choice; Occupational Segregation; Racial Differences; Schooling; Transition, School to Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This report used data from the black subsample of the NLSY to investigate the effects of school desegregation on subsequent employment desegregation. Analysis is based on 472 female and 602 male blacks who reported being employed either full- or part-time at the time of the 1980 survey. It was found that in the north, blacks from desegregated schools were more likely to be located in desegregated occupational work groups. Moreover, blacks from desegregated school backgrounds made fewer racial distinctions about the friendliness of their co-workers or about the competence of their employment supervisors. In contrast, blacks from segregated schools tended to find desegregated co-workers to be less friendly and white supervisors to be less competent. Evidence suggests that both early school desegregation experiences and current community desegregation patterns promote desegregation in work environments, with school desegregation showing a greater impact, particularly among northern blacks. Thus, it appears that the inferred social-psychological processes that perpetuate minority segregation across institutional settings are not artifactual, but are outcomes of cross-race experiences in the varied institutional settings. Results also suggest that early desegregated experiences create a different attitudinal basis among blacks that, in part, produces or sustains desegregation in adulthood. [(c)APA]
Bibliography Citation
Braddock, Jomills H. and James M. McPartland. "More Evidence on Social-Psychological Processes that Perpetuate Minority Segregation: The Relationship of School Desegregation and Employment Desegregation." Report No. 338, Center for Social Organization of Schools, Johns Hopkins University, June 1983.
2. Braddock, Jomills H.
McPartland, James M.
Social Psychological Processes that Perpetuate Racial Segregation: The Relationship Between School and Employment Segregation
Journal of Black Studies 19,3 (March 1989): 267-289.
Also: http://jbs.sagepub.com/content/19/3/267.full.pdf+html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Employment; Geographical Variation; High School; Life Cycle Research; Occupational Segregation; Occupations; Racial Differences; Schooling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Interview data from the black subsample (N=472 females and 602 males) of the NLSY are used to investigate the effects of school desegregation on subsequent employment desegregation. Findings show that in the North, net of individual differences in sex, age, occupational status, and local demographic conditions, blacks from desegregated schools are more likely to be employed in desegregated occupational work groups. Moreover, in racially mixed employment settings, blacks from desegregated school backgrounds make fewer racial distinctions about the friendliness of their coworkers or about the competence of their employment supervisors. In contrast, blacks from segregated schools perceived desegregated coworker groups to be slightly less friendly and white supervisors to be significantly less competent. The results are discussed in terms of theories of intervening social-psychological processes that link desegregation across different institutional settings and stages of the life cycle. [Sociological Abstracts, Inc.]
Bibliography Citation
Braddock, Jomills H. and James M. McPartland. "Social Psychological Processes that Perpetuate Racial Segregation: The Relationship Between School and Employment Segregation." Journal of Black Studies 19,3 (March 1989): 267-289.
3. Nafziger, Dean H.
Holland, J. L.
Helms, S. T.
McPartland, James M.
Applying an Occupational Classification to the Work Histories of Young Men and Women
Journal of Vocational Behavior 5,3 (December 1974): 331-345.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0001879174900232
Cohort(s): Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Holland's Typology; Mobility, Job; Occupational Aspirations; Work History

Holland's occupational classification is used to analyze work histories of young men and women ages 14 through 24. The analysis supports the usefulness of occupational classification for organizing work histories. The results indicate that for both sexes the classification reflected regular patterns for job changes. In addition, the category of a previous job is found to be a good predictor of subsequent jobs; likewise, the category of a current job forecasts the category of his/her vocational aspiration. Finally, consistency of an occupational code was related to job stability for whites.
Bibliography Citation
Nafziger, Dean H., J. L. Holland, S. T. Helms and James M. McPartland. "Applying an Occupational Classification to the Work Histories of Young Men and Women." Journal of Vocational Behavior 5,3 (December 1974): 331-345.