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Author: MaCurdy, Thomas E.
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Cameron, A. Colin
Gritz, R. Mark
MaCurdy, Thomas E.
The Effects of Unemployment Compensation on the Unemployment of Youths
NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-4, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1989.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/ore/abstract/nl/nl890010.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Earnings; Employment, Youth; Gender Differences; Job Patterns; Unemployment; Unemployment Insurance; Unemployment, Youth; Wages; Work History

This report examines the role of unemployment insurance (UI) policies on the amount of unemployment that youth experience between jobs. Specifically, the analysis focuses on determining how the weekly benefit amounts and the weeks of eligibility offered by UI programs influence three aspects of nonemployment activities: (1) total length of time spent in nonemployment; (2) fraction of this time reported as unemployment; and (3) likelihood that an individual collects UI during a nonemployment episode. Two intermediate goals of this research included: (1) the computation of a comprehensive summary of the weekly work and earnings experiences of youth; and (2) an assessment of the extent to which youth are eligible for UI and the degree to which they draw on UI entitlements. The aim was to identify two sets of patterns, those describing differences across demographic characteristics and those capturing changes over the period 1979-1984. Data from the NLSY are utilized in these analyses. The empirical results for men presented in this study indicate that an individual who collects UI typically experiences a longer spell of nonemployment, at least up to the exhaustion of UI benefits, and reports a larger fraction of this spell as unemployment than a nonrecipient. The results show slight increases in recipiency and in the fraction of a nonemployment spell listed as unemployment; however, this rise in weekly benefits has essentially no effect on either the length of nonemployment spells or on the number of weeks of unemployment, irrespective of whether one considers the population at large or only the population of UI recipients. Other findings are summarized for young men and are found to also apply for young women with only two exceptions. First, while female UI recipients experience moreunemployment than nonrecipients at least up to the point of benefit exhaustion, there is some ambiguity as to whether a similar relationship exists for women when comparing le ngths of nonemployment spells. Second, the weekly benefit amount is not a factor at all in influencing women's experiences. In contrast to men, changes in weekly benefits have no effect on the fraction of a nonemployment spell reported as unemployment, nor do they affect the likelihood that a woman collects UI benefits. In general, the findings of this report suggest that features of UI programs that change the size of weekly benefit amounts are not likely to affect unemployment, whereas features that alter the amount of weeks of eligibility are likely to shift unemployment for those individuals who experience the longer durations.
Bibliography Citation
Cameron, A. Colin, R. Mark Gritz and Thomas E. MaCurdy. "The Effects of Unemployment Compensation on the Unemployment of Youths." NLS Discussion Paper No. 92-4, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1989.
2. Cameron, A. Colin
MaCurdy, Thomas E.
A Description of the Earnings and Employment Experiences of Youth
Presented: San Diego, CA, Meetings of the Western Economics Association, 1990
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Earnings; Educational Attainment; Labor Force Participation; Unemployment, Youth

Remarkably little is known about the patterns and volatility of labor market activities of youth over a 12-month horizon. Data from the NLSY on earnings and employment experiences are categorized by 13 age-education groups and six years. Variation across different age-education groups, variation over time, and variation within each age-education group are summarized. The observed variation across different age-education groups is consistent with a priori beliefs. The observed variation over time is consistent with the business cycle of the early 1980s. Within each age-education group there is a substantial variation in labor market experiences. Even at the individual level, there is substantial variation in labor market experiences over the course of a calendar year.
Bibliography Citation
Cameron, A. Colin and Thomas E. MaCurdy. "A Description of the Earnings and Employment Experiences of Youth." Presented: San Diego, CA, Meetings of the Western Economics Association, 1990.
3. Gritz, R. Mark
MaCurdy, Thomas E.
Participation in Low-Wage Labor Markets by Young Men
NLS Discussion Paper No. 93-16, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1992.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/ore/abstract/nl/nl920030.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Dual Economic Theory; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Labor Force Participation; Labor Supply; Life Cycle Research; Mobility; Work Histories

This in-progress research uses data from the NLSY to analyze the process of earnings mobility during the early stages of the life-cycle, with the main effort devoted to understanding the role that participation in low-wage labor markets plays in this process. This research will develop a comprehensive picture of where low-paying jobs fit into the career paths of individuals, including an assessment of both the short-term and the long-term consequences of involvement in low-wage employment on subsequent mobility. This picture will identify the characteristics of workers who participate in low-wage labor markets, the extent to which these workers remain in or return to such markets, and the routes of escape from low- paying jobs. This research has two major objectives. (1) The first task will be to formulate an integrated data set incorporating information on experiences in employment distinguished by level of pay, on schooling and training activities, and on periods of nonemployment. The NLSY offers an unparalleled source for constructing a data set of this type. Part of this task includes several analyses designed to check the reliability of our earnings and employment quantities. (2) The second task will be to develop an empirical model that will summarize youths' experiences in four distinct activities: high-earnings employment, low-earnings employment, educational pursuits, and nonemployment. The estimation of this model will provide a complete characterization not only of the average amounts of time that individuals spend in these activities during the initial years of their working lifetimes, but also of the likelihood that they will move between activities in a particular sequence and for specific durations. To present the implications of this model in a readily understandable format, this project will implement a simple simulation strategy that directly assesses the relationships linking the various categories of employment and time spent not working for different demographic groups.
Bibliography Citation
Gritz, R. Mark and Thomas E. MaCurdy. "Participation in Low-Wage Labor Markets by Young Men." NLS Discussion Paper No. 93-16, Washington DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1992.
4. Gritz, R. Mark
MaCurdy, Thomas E.
Mroz, Thomas
An Evaluation of the NLSY
Working Paper, Seattle WA: Battelle Memorial Institute, February 1994
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Battelle Human Affairs Research Center
Keyword(s): Attrition; Demography; Employment, Youth; Longitudinal Data Sets; Longitudinal Surveys; Sample Selection

The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) has become one of the most widely used data sources for investigating many of the economic and demographic circumstances faced by young adults during the 1980s. As the NLSY enters its second decade, some researchers may be concerned about the current representativeness of the NLSY due to attrition which has plagued other longitudinal data sets. There has been surprisingly little attrition from the NLSY, but there has been little research done to date to determine the relevance of the researchers' concern. This study will investigate the nature and potential consequences of attrition in the NLSY, by carrying out an empirical study of the reliability of these data focusing on three groups of questions: 1. Does the sample selection from the NLSY on the basis of attrition status alter the distributions of earnings and other labor-market variables in a way that changes our picture of youths' employment experiences? 2. How well does the NLSY replicate the labor-market experiences of various demographic segments of the youth population in the US? 3. What are the characteristics of those who miss surveys in the NLSY? Also, what are the characteristics of those who return to the sample?
Bibliography Citation
Gritz, R. Mark, Thomas E. MaCurdy and Thomas Mroz. "An Evaluation of the NLSY." Working Paper, Seattle WA: Battelle Memorial Institute, February 1994.
5. MaCurdy, Thomas E.
Using Information on the Moments of Disturbances to Increase the Efficiency of Estimation
NBER Technical Working Paper No. 022, National Bureau of Economic Research, May 1982.
Also: http://nber.nber.org/papers/T0022
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Data Quality/Consistency; Educational Returns; Schooling; Treatment Response: Monotone, Semimonotone, or Concave-monotone; Variables, Independent - Covariate; Wages; Wages, Men

Econometric analyses of treatment response commonly use instrumental variable (IV) assumptions to identify treatment effects. Yet the credibility of IV assumptions is often a matter of considerable disagreement, with much debate about whether some covariate is or is not a 'valid instrument' in an application of interest. There is therefore good reason to consider weaker but more credible assumptions. To this end, we introduce monotone instrumental variable (MIV) assumptions. A particularly interesting special case of an MIV assumption is monotone treatment selection (MTS). IV and MIV assumptions may be imposed alone or in combination with other assumptions. We study the identifying power of MIV assumptions in three informational settings: MIV alone; MIV combined with the classical linear response assumption; MIV combined with the monotone treatment response (MTR) assumption. We apply the results to the problem of inference on the returns to schooling. We analyze wage data reported by white male respondents to the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and use the respondent's AFQT score as an MIV. We find that this MIV assumption has little identifying power when imposed alone. However, combining the MIV assumption with the MTR and MTS assumptions yields fairly tight bounds on two distinct measures of the returns to schooling.
Bibliography Citation
MaCurdy, Thomas E. "Using Information on the Moments of Disturbances to Increase the Efficiency of Estimation." NBER Technical Working Paper No. 022, National Bureau of Economic Research, May 1982.
6. MaCurdy, Thomas E.
Keating, Bryan
Nagavarapu, Sriniketh S.
Profiling the Plight of Disconnected Youth in America
Working Paper, Department of Economics, Stanford University, March 2006
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Department of Economics, Stanford University
Keyword(s): Disconnected Youth; Employment; Foster Care; Mothers, Adolescent; Parental Influences; School Dropouts; Schooling; Youth Problems

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
MaCurdy, Thomas E., Bryan Keating and Sriniketh S. Nagavarapu. "Profiling the Plight of Disconnected Youth in America." Working Paper, Department of Economics, Stanford University, March 2006.
7. MaCurdy, Thomas E.
Mroz, Thomas
Gritz, R. Mark
An Evaluation of the National Longitudinal Survey on Youth
Journal of Human Resources 33,2 (Spring 1998): 345-436.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/146435
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Attrition; Data Quality/Consistency; Labor Market Surveys; NLS Description; Welfare; Work History

The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) has become one of the most widely used data sources for investigating many of the economic and demographic circumstances faced by young adults during the 1980s. The usefulness of the NLSY for empirical analyses relies on the presumption that these data are representative of the population of U.S. youths throughout the 1980s. As the NLSY approaches its third decade, researchers may be concerned about the ongoing representativeness of the NLSY due to the possibility of nonrandom attrition.
Bibliography Citation
MaCurdy, Thomas E., Thomas Mroz and R. Mark Gritz. "An Evaluation of the National Longitudinal Survey on Youth." Journal of Human Resources 33,2 (Spring 1998): 345-436.