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Author: Lewis, Susan Kay
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Lewis, Susan Kay
Sorting and Timing: Search, Population Structure, and Marriage Markets
Ph.D. Dissertation, University of California -- Los Angeles, 1997
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Demography; Educational Status; Family Studies; Marriage; Simultaneity

This dissertation documents the impact of marriage market composition on marriage timing and educational assortative mating. Whether local population constraints shape individual action is a central issue in social demography. But most research on marriage market composition examines only the effect of competition on either marriage timing or marital sorting alone. The search theoretic model on which this dissertation is based highlights the importance of considering both timing and sorting simultaneously, since individuals can adapt to shortages of available mates by adjusting either or both. Furthermore, it emphasizes the importance of local educational composition as well as competition. I ask three questions: Does educational sorting vary with age? Does it depend on the educational composition of local marriage markets? And does the connection between marriage timing and educational sorting depend on the marriage market's educational composition? To answer these questions I estimate a discrete-time competing risks model of the likelihoods of sorting successfully and unsuccessfully by education, using individual data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and community descriptors from aggregated U.S. Census microdata. Results support the idea that sorting varies with age: educationally good matches and bad matches occur in different age patterns. Furthermore, marital sorting outcomes depend on local educational composition. And the age pattern of educational sorting shifts with changes in local marriage markets' educational composition. In sum, the evidence suggests that timing and sorting are jointly shaped by individuals' adaptations to marriage market conditions.
Bibliography Citation
Lewis, Susan Kay. Sorting and Timing: Search, Population Structure, and Marriage Markets. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of California -- Los Angeles, 1997.
2. Lewis, Susan Kay
Oppenheimer, Valerie Kincaid
Educational Assortative Mating Across Marriage Markets: Non-Hispanic Whites in the United States
Demography 37,1 (February 2000): 29-40.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/p46r1515r2240263/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Educational Attainment; Educational Status; Marriage

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The writers analyze the effect of local marriage markets' educational composition on educational assortative mating and on how sorting varies with age. They expect that in less educationally concentrated marriage markets, residents are more likely to marry hypogamously along education and predict that the less the degree of educational concentration in a marriage market, the more residents' chance of educational hypogamy increases with age. Drawing on individual data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and community descriptors aggregated from census microdata, they estimate a discrete-time competing-risks model of educational sorting outcomes. Their findings reveal that residents of educationally less favorable marriage markets are more likely to marry down on education and that, for women, their chance of doing so rises with age more than for residents of more favorable markets. Copyright: Database Producer Copyright (c) the H.W. Wilson Company. All rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Lewis, Susan Kay and Valerie Kincaid Oppenheimer. "Educational Assortative Mating Across Marriage Markets: Non-Hispanic Whites in the United States." Demography 37,1 (February 2000): 29-40.
3. Lewis, Susan Kay
Ross, Catherine E.
Mirowsky, John
Establishing a Sense of Personal Control in the Transition to Adulthood
Social Forces 77,4 (June 1999): 1573-1599.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3005887
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Cognitive Ability; Control; Dropouts; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study tests the hypothesis that the high sense of personal control enjoyed by adult Americans develops during the transition to adulthood. Analyses use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), which interviewed respondents in 1979 who were between the ages of 14 and 22 and again in 1992 when they were between 27 and 35. Cross-sectional analyses show a positive slope of perceived control with respect to age in the range from 14 through 22. Dropping out of school dampens the increase. It further reduces perceptions of control prospectively, net of control at time 1. Getting pregnant or getting a partner pregnant does not flatten the slope and does not affect later adulthood perceptions of control, except indirectly if it leads to dropping out of school. Adolescent sense of control correlates positively with parental education and the adolescent's cognitive skill, and cognitive skill increases the trajectory for young men but not for young women. Both factors predict more positive changes in the sense of control in the period between adolescence and middle age. A low sense of control at the beginning of the follow-up period does not increase the risk of subsequently dropping out of school, but it does increase the risk of a subsequent nonmarital pregnancy.
Bibliography Citation
Lewis, Susan Kay, Catherine E. Ross and John Mirowsky. "Establishing a Sense of Personal Control in the Transition to Adulthood." Social Forces 77,4 (June 1999): 1573-1599.
4. Seeman, Melvin
Lewis, Susan Kay
Powerlessness, Health and Mortality: A Longitudinal Study of Older Men and Mature Women
Social Science and Medicine 41,4 (August 1995): 517-525.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/027795369400362W
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Health Care; Health Factors; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Mortality; Psychological Effects

Data from the 1976/77 and 1981/82 National Longitudinal Surveys of older men (ages 45-59 when first surveyed in 1966) and 3,475 mature women (ages 30-44 in 1967) establish the association over time between the sense of powerlessness and various indices of health status (chiefly, psychosocial symptoms and limits on physical activities). Results are basically coordinate for men and women, and are replicated for initially healthy and initially impaired subsamples. Powerlessness is associated with greater activity limits and more psychosocial symptoms, and also provides prospective prediction, since high initial powerlessness scores are associated with health problems observed 5 and 10 years later, with initial health controlled. Increasing powerlessness accompanies deterioration in health (with stringent controls on prior health). For a subsample of men, mortality 1976-1981 is also associated with initially high powerlessness scores (with prior health controlled). Results are discussed for their import in relation to the steadily growing interest in social psychological factors in health. 4 Tables, 35 References. Adapted from the source document. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Seeman, Melvin and Susan Kay Lewis. "Powerlessness, Health and Mortality: A Longitudinal Study of Older Men and Mature Women." Social Science and Medicine 41,4 (August 1995): 517-525.