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Author: Khadem Sameni, Mona
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Khadem Sameni, Mona
Essays on Health and Labor Market Practices in the U.S.
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Health, Mental; Job Search; Substance Use; Supervisor Characteristics; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This dissertation investigates the link between different aspects of labor market and individuals' health. The first chapter analyzes the relationship between the use of four different substances and nonstandard work schedules. Using the NLSY97 and applying standard panel techniques as well as survival analyses, I find that contrary to most previous evidence, nonstandard work schedule is not necessarily associated with an increase in substance use, and in the case of drinking and binge drinking such correlation is actually negative. Evidence also suggests that drug prone individuals tend to work more at nonstandard schedules. Results are robust to the specification at the intensive margin and accounting for long-term exposure to work at nonstandard schedules. The second chapter investigates the effect of alcohol use on job search behavior of young individuals. Using the age of respondents from the NLSY97 both in the year and month formats and applying regression discontinuity design by utilizing the surge in alcohol consumption at age 21, I find that young adults tend to increase their drinking and binge drinking once they are allowed to legally access alcohol. However, I find that the surge in alcohol use at age 21 does not seem to immediately or directly affect the job search behavior of young individuals while they are employed or unemployed. I also find that it does not seem to affect their lack of desire for work. The third chapter investigates the effects of workers' age, gender, and race relative to those of their supervisors on several measures of the employees' mental wellbeing. Evidence suggests that men show positive mental health signs when they have supervisors of same gender and race. They also seem to like supervisors who are almost the same age. On the contrary, women's mental health seems to be negatively affected when they have female supervisors. When the gender match effect is combined with race, it is magnified. Women also report negative mental health signs when all these demographic characteristic matches are happening at the same time. Additional tests suggest that reverse causality does not seem to be a major issue here.
Bibliography Citation
Khadem Sameni, Mona. Essays on Health and Labor Market Practices in the U.S. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, 2016.
2. Khadem Sameni, Mona
The Relationship between Nonstandard Work Schedules and Substance Use: New Evidence From NLSY97
Presented: Chicago IL: American Public Health Association Annual Meeting, October-November 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Drug Use; Shift Workers; Substance Use; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

More than one-fifth of all employed Americans work in the evening, at night, or on a rotating shift. Such increasingly common employment that tends to interrupt daily routines could have important psychological and physiological impacts on the employees. Those health effects might ultimately influence productivity at work, healthcare costs, crime rates and the need for employee assistance programs. The recent reports on the increase in the positive drug use among the American workforce reflected in the National Survey on Drug Use and Health in 2013 together with a September 2014 report by Quest Diagnostics raises suspicions over the association of working at nonstandard schedules and more substance use. Most of the previous studies, however, used non-representative cross sectional data that often suffer from different biases and are unable to track changes and developments in characteristics of the shift workers through time Using 15 consecutive rounds of an American longitudinal dataset for the first time and applying survival analysis in addition to standard panel data techniques to correct for some of the previous problems such as attenuation bias and 'healthy shift-worker survivor bias', it turns out in contrast with the past studies' findings, overall no evidence appear to exist on the relationship between being a shift worker and an increase in substance use and other than the case of cocaine use, almost all other coefficients appear to be negative. Nonetheless none of the correlations imply large effects in absolute terms.
Bibliography Citation
Khadem Sameni, Mona. "The Relationship between Nonstandard Work Schedules and Substance Use: New Evidence From NLSY97." Presented: Chicago IL: American Public Health Association Annual Meeting, October-November 2015.